BobPop

"USE UP" all those feathers....

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This is a fleye where you can utilize ALL those feathers you keep preening through and never seem to use. Its all feathers...... very similar to a Semper Fleye but uses feathers of multiple sizes or lengths to construct the streamer. Palmered hackle spreader at the hook bend (instead of bucktail) and slender saddles spaced around the shank with the last saddle flat on top. Then a few palmerede turns of a webby saddle, and another set of saddles of a shorter length than before. More turns of webby saddle and two saddles on the underside and one flat on top. Webby saddle again and very short saddles on the underside and top till the shank is completed. Finish with very short saddles on top(they are "shingled" toward the hook eye) and a JC eye or tab eye.

The top of the fleye looks like the head of a bird with its tapered feathers. Neat looking ! It is as if you are sculpting a fly with feathers. As in the Bucktail Deceiver or Hollow Fleye, you are creating the taper, but this time, with feathers instead of bucktail.

The movement in the water is awesome to say the least. All those tips pulsate and give added life to the design. Try it and let your imagination go wild.

BobPop

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Bob,

I'm about to purchase some feathers/hackles, what do you recommend in terms of strung hackles or whole capes? I am mostly looking to tie some Sempers. I know the long, thin ones are good for tails on the Hollow/Semper, but I know a whole cape costs a pretty good buck just for one color. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance~Darren

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Darren- Great question!!!! I've been "getting by" with the stuff I have but the feathers I have are from my freshwater tying supplies.

 

Bob- great work as usual. These fleyes are a work of art!!!

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Darren,

For me, I rather have the strung saddles than the whole skin. I do not have much use for the excessively long feathers. I like the feathers that are about 7" long and with a moderate stem and nice taper. They should also have some web type barbules for better feather presence. In the Semper Fleye I use two distinct feather types; slender ones for the tail and webby ones for the collar. Just like all natural materials, you have to choose your material for specific purposes.

BobPop

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How about a Feather Primer...That would be a good topic for a post.

 

at least for a numbnutz like myself.

 

 

To me they all come off a bird...how they are different I have no clue.

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Dam them sure is pretty....and your going to feed them to a fish! You use the red and yellow color schema a lot in your feathered fly's is that a good color combo?

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A feather primer? Well, how 'bout a very basic outline? Here is a few thoughts or observations I have on the subject.

Two major differences; saddle hackle and neck hackle. The saddle hackles are more tapered and the stems are finer throughout the feather except at the base. The neck hackles have a more pronounced stem and seem to move only at the tip. The saddle hackles are more desired for deceivers(more action) Neck hackles look good palmered around the shank., but are often used for divided wings on tarpon flies and LM bass poppers. The saddle hackle is KING for most applications in SW. It is simply more versatile than the neck hackle.

As you look at the hackle, take a look at its make up. Starts with a strong, thick stem that has a fluffy section in the beginning. This is the "webby" portion of the feather. This webby section can run the entire length or quickly turn into more defined barbules. Other, more desireable feathers have a thinner stem and a nice taper. These two attributes help deliver the action in feathered flies. These softer stems alow the feather to move more than the heavier stem type. Even the barbules have differences. You'll see feathers that posess more web next to the stem than others, while others have barely any. The latter might have great movement but do not have as good a presence in the water as the ones that have "some" web associated with its make up. The choice is a personal choice of the tyer.

Saddles with large webby sections are very desireable for hackling around the shank. This can be built up for some beautiful effects in the fly and be beneficial to making a fly more effective. It can be wrapped heavily around the shank to increase currents that help move the wing section of the fly.

As in the case of the fleyes I posted here, I used saddles for the wing and webby saddles for the hook shank. I like to stagger the lengths of the feathers to increase the action and I also used palmered, webby feathers and tiny feathers on the shank section to create a desired look and more action material acvtivity along the shank. Color combination or separation is easier to achieve that way too.

I am running long here so I will send this out and come back to it later. If any questions about anything I may have missed, just post it and I'll get to it later.

BobPop

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