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PASurfer

Heavy hardwood

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OK... since we got us some new co-leaders, I'll dump the first official lure-making question in yer laps...

 

I've been holding onto a chunk of dark hardwood, some exotic spieces that I think is called bocotite (sp?). It's really dense and heavy; if you turn it on a lathe and sand it, the surface comes out looking like it was diamond polished. Anyway, I've been eyeballing it for something simple like a needlefish or polaris plug, only it would most likely run middle to near bottom of the water column.

 

I don't own a lathe, so I'd be forced to go at it Guzz's way -- by rough hand-carving and sanding -- and I was wondering if I'd be wasting my time with wood so heavy? I think a 6" needlefish would weigh close to 3 ounces without adding any lead. I do know it does not float; looks to have a sink rate of approx 1 foot per second. But I figure if you're cranking it, even moderately, it should stay off the bottom.

 

Any ideas on whether it would be worth the time, and what sort of plug shape to try, since it's not surface material?

 

Thanks... Ron

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Ron,

i just sarted making needles myself.and really don't know to much about how they are to be weighted.tim basically told me that it's pretty much a prefference thing.some guys like them to run nose up a bit.others at neutral bouyancy.and yet others like a slow horizontal sink.but from what i understand about needles,they are basically reeled in at a steady pace.just making a"V" wake.adding in a few pops here and there.so i would guess a plug that sinks might not be suited very well for a needle fish pattern.but it just might be the ticket for a swimmer.with the dense properties of the wood that you descriped,a relatively small plug would throw quite far.but there is alittle more to making swimmers than topwater plugs.i.m not the best guy at tunning them buggers.chas's run true and sweet thoughsmile.gif

 

guzz

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I am not familiar of that species of wood, but I have a book at home and I will check to see if it is in it. It sounds like it would be good for needles. There definitely is a use for ones that sink. In a decent swell or current, they will stay above the rocks. I still cry when I think of a large that I lost last year on a sinking needle. You may need to soften the wood with some boiled linseed oil to help open the pores for painting. I say make a couple and test them out, that the only way you'll know. If not, try making some swimmers or poppers. Good luck and let us know how you they come out.

 

Charlie

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PASurfer - A word of warning!

Dust from a lot of exotic woods are very hazardous. Please, at the least, have a fan blowing the dust away from your face. Also wearing a mask won't be an overkill either. A dust colletor posiitioned close to the work area is very good.

tg

 

[This message has been edited by TonyG (edited 07-27-2001).]

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PASurfer, Tony G is right on target when talking about some of the exotic types of wood & the by products they produce when being sanded, turned or heated up. I have made all kinds of things out of all kinds of exotic wood including striper plugs. Personnaly I would save that piece of hardwood for some other application, or possibly trade it for a good piece of cedar or other type of wood with simular characteristics. By using cedar (which is much lighter & bouyant) you can insert your own weighting system & design the plug to float or sink however you want. Good luck with your plug making...... pikiemike

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Thanks guys for the thoughts and cautions. I wasn't aware specifically of problems with exotic woods, but will definately keep that in mind.

 

"Nothing beats a failure, like a try" is the expression that comes to mind. I bought and used the bulk of this wood for another project; that's where the "leftovers" came from. The grain is medium-dark brown to almost black. Depending on how the grain runs in my scrap piece, I was thinking like Brian about just clear coating the plug.

 

Since I don't own a lathe, I'm tossing around ideas for some sort of jig to assist in rough cutting or rasping the plug shape, then sanding. That's why I was asking for "simple plug" suggestions. If it turns out reasonable, I'll post the result later.

 

Thanks agian... Ron

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TO PA SURFER GO AHEAD MAKE THAT NEEDLEFISH 3OZ IS NOT TO HEAVY YOU SHOULD ADD SOME LEAD TO BALNCE THE PLUG I MAKE MINE OUT OF MAPLE WHEN YOU REEL IN THE SLACK THE PLUG WILL COME RIGHT TO THE TOP TRUST ME!!! SOME OF MINE ARE OVER 4OZ GOOD LUCK BOB

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a friend gave me a piece of amazon wood he called eppe. it is very dark, very dense, very strong. I've been making some darters out of it, using it for the bottom half of the plug, and cedar for the top half. I make a shallow saw cut in both pieces,epoxy them together, and use the saw cut for the thru wire.

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