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Cape Cod - Alge bloom, beach closing, dying oysters

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I was watching WHDH at a news segment about 94 beach is closing due to these toxic layer of algae bloom that covers the entire beach, killing the oysters and other shell fish under them due to sun block.

 

I can't find the segment. But seems significant enough to effect everything in the water. Not just cape cod. But just looking up  there is a bunch of beach closures already.

 

Edited by foxfai
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48 mins ago, foxfai said:

I was watching WHDH at a news segment about 94 beach is closing due to these toxic layer of algae bloom that covers the entire beach, killing the oysters and other shell fish under them due to sun block.

 

I can't find the segment. But seems significant enough to effect everything in the water. Not just cape cod. But just looking up  there is a bunch of beach closures already.

 

Often what kills the shellfish is not the toxicity of the algae blooms. But rather the algae itself completely clogging up the it's digestive system.

 

Shellfish are filter feeders.  They feed on microscopic phytoplankton suspended in the water.  They're constantly filtering water, all the while extracting the phytoplankton suspended in it.  For instance, an adult oyster supposedly filters as much as 50 gallons daily.

 

But when shellfish feed, they can't discriminate. They ingest everything, even the algae blooms.  Algae is indigestible. This is when the shellfish run into trouble, and they shut down eating.  But in bad extended periods, it can cause large numbers of them to die.

The Sultan of Sluggo

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My theory is;

we had a wet rainy winter and early spring. Rivers were high. Lots of nutrients in the run off.

 

Now we're into a hot, dry late spring - early summer. Lots of sun beating down on all those nutrients = algae. 

 

Bottom line is, there's too many freggin people and more houses go up every day. 

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Long Nook Beach has been closed because of dangerous sand conditions, also the commercial season will be closed on July 3. Peace and Prayers 

Life member M.B.B.A #509

Life member Izaak Walton Fishing Association

Life member Cape Cod Canal

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Ah! found the article (if it matters) .The video explains better than I do.

 

https://whdh.com/7-investigates/7-investigates-toxic-takeover/

 

MASHPEE, MASS. (WHDH) - For centuries, the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe have fished in Popponesset Bay.

“I could go up in that river at anytime and pick a bushel of steamers out of a hole this big,” said Vernon “Buddy” Popknep of the Wampanoag.

But those days are over. Now, Popknep and Nathan Mills can only find shellfish in their man-made farm.

“There’s no more production of wild shellfish anymore. The bays are so polluted they can’t survive,” Mills said.

The situation is grim — more than 90 percent of Cape Cod’s saltwater bays are poisoned by these destructive algae blooms.

“What I see is a lot of devastation,” Popknep said.

The algae almost feels like hair and even looks like it, but when it builds up along the shoreline and clumps together, it blocks out all the sunlight killing everything underneath.

“Not enough water to even flush it out,” said Popknep.

7 Investigates went out on the water to see the damage up close. Algae is piling up along the riverbanks, in front of houses, turning the water a cloudy green. When this algae dies, it sinks and rots into a foul-smelling mud.

“You got about 18 inches of mud right here,” Popknep said.

Why is this happening? Environmentalists say nitrogen that is naturally produced from human waste in septic tanks is seeping into the water and feeding the algae blooms.

And some of these blooms aren’t just unsightly. If people are exposed to them in fresh water, they can suffer from stomach problems, respiratory issues, and skin rashes.

“Young children and pets are more susceptible,” said Andrew Gottlieb, of the Association to Preserve Cape Cod.

The blooms are also bad for the cape’s $1.4 billion dollar tourist industry.

“That house two doors down, they rent. So, if they’re charging $3,000 a week and a customer shows up the week that the town has notified you that you should stay out of the water, you’re going to have a lot of unhappy customers,” Gottlieb said.

Towns across Cape Cod are trying to stop the algae blooms by approving a major sewer project expected to last 30 years and cost millions. Its goal is to stop nearly all nitrogen from reaching the coastline.

“It comes down to a generational problem that occurred over multiple generations, and we’re trying to tackle it in just one generation,” said Kelly Colopy – the communications manager of the Barnstable Department of Public Works.

Barnstable is digging up streets to put down new pipes that will connect more than 1,000 homes and businesses to the sewer system.

“It does come with a lot of traffic complexities and obviously construction fatigue, too,” Colopy said. “It’s a delicate dance, but ultimately it’s work that needs to get done.”

Within 7 years, the project should cut the amount of nitrogen in Barnstable waters by 44 percent.

“We need all hands on deck. It’s a lifelong mission to clean this up. It might not happen in our generation, but if we can make make some smarter changes about the way we live, the way we eat, and the way we think, I think we can accomplish some great things,” Mills said.

And even though the fight is long, it’s one that many on Cape Cod are committed to winning.

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23 hours ago, Angler #1 said:

Long Nook Beach has been closed because of dangerous sand conditions, also the commercial season will be closed on July 3. Peace and Prayers 

dangerous sand conditions?     

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It's pretty crazy when development starts in earnest and the powers to be did not think of what infrastructure they will need to handle the growth.  Until it's a dire situation and then they are like, oh s@@@ .. I mean, start building house after house right along the shore line and what did you think was going to happen to the water quality.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, 27conch said:

It's pretty crazy when development starts in earnest and the powers to be did not think of what infrastructure they will need to handle the growth.  Until it's a dire situation and then they are like, oh s@@@ .. I mean, start building house after house right along the shore line and what did you think was going to happen to the water quality.

 

 

 

 

Much like our fisheries management. Some things never change. 

Pfantum Pfishah

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4 hours ago, Gotcow? said:

dangerous sand conditions?     

Gotcow dangerous sand conditions means that the pathway from the top to the bottom is to dangerous to allow any one to traverse the sand from the top down to the bottom may cause a sand slide and bury them in the falling sand . If you have fished this beach you would better understand the reasoning why the National Sea shore is closing it. To add this walk from the top is not in a straight line from the top to bottom , but rather a z type path because it is so steep to traverse and maintain your balance and it has been like that ever since I began to fish it back in the mid 40;s The storm surges take away the path that needs to be worked out by trained folks to sustain. Peace and Prayers 

Life member M.B.B.A #509

Life member Izaak Walton Fishing Association

Life member Cape Cod Canal

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Just now, Angler #1 said:

Gotcow dangerous sand conditions means that the pathway from the top to the bottom is to dangerous to allow any one to traverse the sand from the top down to the bottom may cause a sand slide and bury them in the falling sand . If you have fished this beach you would better understand the reasoning why the National Sea shore is closing it. To add this walk from the top is not in a straight line from the top to bottom , but rather a z type path because it is so steep to traverse and maintain your balance and it has been like that ever since I began to fish it back in the mid 40;s The storm surges take away the path that needs to be worked out by trained folks to sustain. Peace and Prayers 

Poor description (not from you) but I understand.

 

Been a while since I was local. 

 

Would be better stated as continued beach erosion issues.

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Where is the Shadow when you need him . Since he is close to the area , would you describe the actual path we once would traverse and slide down at times, where when you got into some nice fish it was a job to get them back up . A place at one time we often would drive to on the beach , before they closed that off as well . A place where our friend Eddy caught his largest fish back in the day and was given his last rites to King Neptune's realm as his friends all stood by  in his honor as a true sand man of the beach. Peace and Prayers

Life member M.B.B.A #509

Life member Izaak Walton Fishing Association

Life member Cape Cod Canal

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On 7/2/2024 at 9:23 PM, foxfai said:

Ah! found the article (if it matters) .The video explains better than I do.

 

https://whdh.com/7-investigates/7-investigates-toxic-takeover/

 

MASHPEE, MASS. (WHDH) - For centuries, the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe have fished in Popponesset Bay.

“I could go up in that river at anytime and pick a bushel of steamers out of a hole this big,” said Vernon “Buddy” Popknep of the Wampanoag.

But those days are over. Now, Popknep and Nathan Mills can only find shellfish in their man-made farm.

“There’s no more production of wild shellfish anymore. The bays are so polluted they can’t survive,” Mills said.

The situation is grim — more than 90 percent of Cape Cod’s saltwater bays are poisoned by these destructive algae blooms.

“What I see is a lot of devastation,” Popknep said.

The algae almost feels like hair and even looks like it, but when it builds up along the shoreline and clumps together, it blocks out all the sunlight killing everything underneath.

“Not enough water to even flush it out,” said Popknep.

7 Investigates went out on the water to see the damage up close. Algae is piling up along the riverbanks, in front of houses, turning the water a cloudy green. When this algae dies, it sinks and rots into a foul-smelling mud.

“You got about 18 inches of mud right here,” Popknep said.

Why is this happening? Environmentalists say nitrogen that is naturally produced from human waste in septic tanks is seeping into the water and feeding the algae blooms.

And some of these blooms aren’t just unsightly. If people are exposed to them in fresh water, they can suffer from stomach problems, respiratory issues, and skin rashes.

“Young children and pets are more susceptible,” said Andrew Gottlieb, of the Association to Preserve Cape Cod.

The blooms are also bad for the cape’s $1.4 billion dollar tourist industry.

“That house two doors down, they rent. So, if they’re charging $3,000 a week and a customer shows up the week that the town has notified you that you should stay out of the water, you’re going to have a lot of unhappy customers,” Gottlieb said.

Towns across Cape Cod are trying to stop the algae blooms by approving a major sewer project expected to last 30 years and cost millions. Its goal is to stop nearly all nitrogen from reaching the coastline.

“It comes down to a generational problem that occurred over multiple generations, and we’re trying to tackle it in just one generation,” said Kelly Colopy – the communications manager of the Barnstable Department of Public Works.

Barnstable is digging up streets to put down new pipes that will connect more than 1,000 homes and businesses to the sewer system.

“It does come with a lot of traffic complexities and obviously construction fatigue, too,” Colopy said. “It’s a delicate dance, but ultimately it’s work that needs to get done.”

Within 7 years, the project should cut the amount of nitrogen in Barnstable waters by 44 percent.

“We need all hands on deck. It’s a lifelong mission to clean this up. It might not happen in our generation, but if we can make make some smarter changes about the way we live, the way we eat, and the way we think, I think we can accomplish some great things,” Mills said.

And even though the fight is long, it’s one that many on Cape Cod are committed to winning.

People are drowning in own shiet.

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