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How to use Bucktails at Jetties

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Salty_angler

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Hey everyone, I'm on Long Island for the summer and have been fishing (a long island) Inlet for about two weeks. I see people at the end using bucktails and getting some decent fish. I tried with one of mine but no fish. I was just wondering how would I work a bucktail at jetties and if I could also use a swimbait on a heavy jighead. Thanks

 

 

Edited by TimS
too specific
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At Inlets, bucktails are one of the most effective ways to catch fish. Picking the bucktail weight is one of the most important parts to being successful. This takes time but you ideally want the bucktail to be on the bottom but not dragging bottom. You will get snagged and it will be frustrating but it takes time to figure out where the snags are and how to get around them.

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I’m going to let the cat out of the bag at that specific inlet.There is a massive movement of water,as you can tell by the rips that setup.About 20 yrs ago it was me and another fellow both throwing bucktails.We were the only 2 out there on this weekday in May.He’s slaughtering them I’m not even getting a touch.After the tide and bite had stopped I walked over to him to see if he would give up the recipe for the secret sauce.Make a long story short I was throwing 2-3 oz bucktails he was throwing 5-6 oz.Now again this is just for that inlet ,cast up current give it a 5 to 10 count and pop your rod from a 9oclock position to a 12 o’clock and hold on. That gentleman and I still fish there.He more than I since he is local to the spot.That is a very productive inlet.

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Local knowledge is key.  Swing the right bucktail on appropriate tackle and you will be rewarded in the current.  Unfortunately a summer will not be enough time to learn the nuances of the area.  You’ll need much longer to develop the feel, learn the bottom and the intricacies that set some apart from the rest.  Leverage the rubber shad on and around slack.

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On 6/11/2024 at 11:54 AM, crazybellringer said:

Don't start with a bucktail bring bank sinkers 4, 3, 2, 1 oz. Tie an overhand knot or any weak knot. Start with 4 throw out like people suggested. Feel how it hits the bottom of it gets stuck break off and move to 3. See how that feels. If I get stuck break off and move to two. Once you get the weight just ticking the bottom and you feel what that is like  select a bucktail that is 1/2 oz lighter. This will give you a good feel for what you should be doing the fish want it moving in current and barely bouncing the bottom. You pull up so you don't get snagged. The trick is have just barely enough weight to maintain a little contact with the bottom while moving in current. The biggest mistake is to go to heavy and keep lifting. This also applies to open beaches. They want it moving in current so it looks natural. Once you understand that you can try to add more action.

That's a really genius. Learn something new every day. Now I feel dirty. Gotta go shower then off myself.:bucktooth:

the human race has proved darwins theory of evolution wrong. we let the dumb survive. 

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You can't claim an entire inlet as a  spot...especially where people have been fishing out in the open for everyone to see for generations. It is not a national secret that all inlets are good spots. Hey it's hard enough to get access anywhere, and I have my special spots I had to search for...these are secret spots NOBODY fishes except me. That is the type spot you protect from the mass of cretins who have invaded our sport. To cry about someone saying an inlet is a good place to catch stripers is over the top.

 

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