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Hi-Lo rigs

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Alex G

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19 hours ago, Alex G said:

Guys, does anybody know where to buy really professionally tied, good quality hi-lo rigs for porgy and/or striper fishing?

As others are saying, don't use the Hi-lo for striper. Do use the Hi-lo for fluke/flounder/blues/whiting. And seriously, you should tie these yourself. You need to learn literally 1 or 2 knots (the dropper loop or the T-knot). The T-knot is really easy, and very hard to mess up, so it isn't like you need to have made 100 of them before you can make your first hi-lo rig. The only real things to play with on the hi-lo are the distances between the T-knot(s) and the overall length. Use a good quality mono, leave it with a true loop on the T-knot, and you can easily swap out the hook for correct size/shape/type to hold bait or for a teaser or bucktail.

 

A pretty good vid on how to do it:

 

Edited by FallenKell
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18 mins ago, Stryper Snyper said:

Why not use a hi low for striper?  What's the downside?  I usually use fish finder but have caught plenty on hi low rigs.  

 

Extra hook to cause damage, for no advantage. If you're fishing from shore, both baits will be on the bottom anyway. If you're fishing vertically it's a little different story.

Massachusetts EPO:

1-800-632-8075

 

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4 mins ago, ermghoti said:

 

Extra hook to cause damage, for no advantage. If you're fishing from shore, both baits will be on the bottom anyway. If you're fishing vertically it's a little different story.

Not arguing but non offset circles pretty much don't cause additional damage right?   I would consider more bait and hooks an advantage at least until locating the fish.  

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Just now, Stryper Snyper said:

Not arguing but non offset circles pretty much don't cause additional damage right?   I would consider more bait and hooks an advantage at least until locating the fish.  

 

Sure, reduced damage, but there's still an additional surgical sharp point in the mix. I'd argue having two baits on the bottom three feet apart isn't doing much to locate fish, so why add the additional risk and complexity.

 

Not saying they don't work, but I can't think of when they'd work better, unless you're targeting suicidally aggressive fish for the table, e.g. scup, winter flounder and so on. Doubles fill the cooler or limit faster than catching one at a time. Not applicable to stripers, obviously.

Massachusetts EPO:

1-800-632-8075

 

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I tie a very simple high-low rig. 
Cut a 4 foot piece of 30lb mono,

tie or snell a hook on each end, come in a foot or so from each end and tie surgeon loops. One loop is for sinker and one loop is to mainline. 

Edited by ecks
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On 6/8/2024 at 1:09 PM, ermghoti said:

 

Extra hook to cause damage, for no advantage. If you're fishing from shore, both baits will be on the bottom anyway. If you're fishing vertically it's a little different story.

You are using a hi-lo rig wrong if you are fishing from shore and both baits are on the bottom. You should have a proper length below the low bait and the sinker so that the low bait floats about a foot over the floor, and the high bait is a 2-4 feet off the floor. You need to pull the line tight so that the weight/sinker at the bottom correctly bites into the sand and holds everything taut back to your rod that you are either holding or is in a rod holder high enough up so that the angle of the line to the tip of the rod doesn't allow for the hi-lo rig to have the bait on the floor (a long rod comes in handy for helping with this as it increases the angle of the line/rig and the same is said for a tall rod holder). This is one of the reasons I use a 13ft rod for this.

 

Alternatively instead of using bait, you can use a bucktail at the bottom instead of a weight reel that in with a smaller teaser in the high spot, mimicking a smaller fish chasing it's own prey, which will many times trigger another fish to attack since they believe the bottom fish is preoccupied attempting to get its own food and too focused that it might not notice it just became lunch itself....

Edited by FallenKell
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Tie your own, 50 to 60#, 7/0 or 8/0 circles for the big guys.  And yes they will work fine for stripers despite what assrod says.  It's pretty much all we use off the surf on the eastern shore besides fishfinders.

 

Your smaller pan fish 12# to 20# with #2 mosquito hook.  You can put pill floats or spinners on those if you want

 

 

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6 hours ago, FallenKell said:

You are using a hi-lo rig wrong if you are fishing from shore and both baits are on the bottom. You should have a proper length below the low bait and the sinker so that the low bait floats about a foot over the floor, and the high bait is a 2-4 feet off the floor. You need to pull the line tight so that the weight/sinker at the bottom correctly bites into the sand and holds everything taut back to your rod that you are either holding or is in a rod holder high enough up so that the angle of the line to the tip of the rod doesn't allow for the hi-lo rig to have the bait on the floor (a long rod comes in handy for helping with this as it increases the angle of the line/rig and the same is said for a tall rod holder). This is one of the reasons I use a 13ft rod for this.

 

Alternatively instead of using bait, you can use a bucktail at the bottom instead of a weight reel that in with a smaller teaser in the high spot, mimicking a smaller fish chasing it's own prey, which will many times trigger another fish to attack since they believe the bottom fish is preoccupied attempting to get its own food and too focused that it might not notice it just became lunch itself....

 

Without a float on one or both leaders, both baits are on the bottom no matter how you tie your rigs. Go to a field, pay out 50 yards of line, spike a rod then go look at the end of the line.

Massachusetts EPO:

1-800-632-8075

 

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