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mtl50

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Forgive my ignorance but could you folks please explain the difference in how these all swim. And what kind of water you might use the different kinds in. 
Thanks

Mike

Tight Lines and High Tides Forever! mtl50
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No apology is needed. Conrads had a flat, blunt head, and they were very popular with jetty anglers who sought to work them in the rips on the lee side of the jetty. Beachmaster's Conrads were prized for this use (like everything else he does). I'm no longer up to jetty hopping, so never bothered to acquire one, though I was very interested for a time. AFAIK nobody is making them now.

 

Slope heads have a much more gradually sloped head, and have a nice float-then-dive action. Popular in NJ circles especially, for whatever reason.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, BrianBM said:

No apology is needed. Conrads had a flat, blunt head, and they were very popular with jetty anglers who sought to work them in the rips on the lee side of the jetty. Beachmaster's Conrads were prized for this use (like everything else he does). I'm no longer up to jetty hopping, so never bothered to acquire one, though I was very interested for a time. AFAIK nobody is making them now.

 

Slope heads have a much more gradually sloped head, and have a nice float-then-dive action. Popular in NJ circles especially, for whatever reason.

I almost always have a regular Conrad in  my bag. But I’ve never used the sloped or jointed. Probably one of the most under used plugs out there. There are still a few folks building the regular ones. 
 

 

 

Thanks for the information.

Edited by mtl50
Tight Lines and High Tides Forever! mtl50
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One point of confusion is long time standard models have been re-named on the internet. I regularly see Trollers called Slopeheads and vice-versa. There were no original Danny jointed versions of either that I am aware of although he might have made a special order for someone. The Conrad and Slopehead are the same plug with the exception of the 45 degree slope. No jointed version of any metal lip goes as deep as the jointed version of the same plug. In my opinion  Conrads run deeper than Slopeheads. 

Edited by SC
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the conrad was first made by a mason in pt to be  fished off the point which had a very deep drop off..conrad malacoat was his name his plug was large and heavy so it would get to the bottom fast where the big girls were..someone found a plug of his and took it back to danny  pichney to copy.to this day many sizes have been made  ca long with shapes. but the true conrad was almost 8 inches long and made of oak or ash and had big brass screw eyes not a plug you would want to cast to many times...again it was made for very deep drrop offs.

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5 hours ago, SC said:

One point of confusion is long time standard models have been re-named on the internet. I regularly see Trollers called Slopeheads and vice-versa. There were no original Danny jointed versions of either that I am aware of although he might have made a special order for someone. The Conrad and Slopehead are the same plug with the exception of the 45 degree slope. No jointed version of any metal lip goes as deep as the jointed version of the same plug. In my opinion  Conrads run deeper than Slopeheads. 

Great analysis here. I would 100% second that a jointed plug, while it has great enticing action, will never get as deep. And when comparing a Conrad to a Troller, a historically accurate Conrad will dig and dive much deeper and faster unless the Trolling plug is insanely heavily weighted.

Conrads are great plugs, the only difficulty with building them is just getting the lip right. It's a custom job.

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5 hours ago, capesams said:

the conrad was first made by a mason in pt to be  fished off the point which had a very deep drop off..conrad malacoat was his name his plug was large and heavy so it would get to the bottom fast where the big girls were..someone found a plug of his and took it back to danny  pichney to copy.to this day many sizes have been made  ca long with shapes. but the true conrad was almost 8 inches long and made of oak or ash and had big brass screw eyes not a plug you would want to cast to many times...again it was made for very deep drrop offs.

That's a neat bit of history.  Thank you.

 

Am I correct that nobody is making a Conrad any more?

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23 hours ago, mtl50 said:

Forgive my ignorance but could you folks please explain the difference in how these all swim. And what kind of water you might use the different kinds in. 
Thanks

Mike

I've always had some interest in the Conrad and I use something close to it in design and action and that's the big daddy goo goo eyes swimmer.

The Conrad's were not easy to get and the coopers were so,that's what I use.

They work very similar I believe just a diff depth.

Someone that knows can correct me if need be.

 

HH

An armed man is a citizen,,,an unarmed man is a subject,,,,,,,,

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21 hours ago, BrianBM said:

No apology is needed. Conrads had a flat, blunt head, and they were very popular with jetty anglers who sought to work them in the rips on the lee side of the jetty. Beachmaster's Conrads were prized for this use (like everything else he does). I'm no longer up to jetty hopping, so never bothered to acquire one, though I was very interested for a time. AFAIK nobody is making them now.

 

Nobody really makes them because all the jetties were dug up or filled over on the NJ beaches with "beach replenishment" over the last 20 years....

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25 mins ago, shark lobster said:

From what I read about the Conrad’s they were made of maple and weighted heavy so to sink down!

I this year have fished a Conrad not a maple one and this one swims close to the surface and has been the most productive lure !

Danny's Conrads varied in every way that can be measured, wood type, length, weight, shape, etc. They were usually but not always maple. They did not sink. They all needed to be tweaked in my opinion. The wood type differences between Conrad batches/runs created the biggest challenges in my opinion. You just can't "slow down" pine enough to get a Conrad swim no matter how it is weighted.

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