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Rocker repair question

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I bought a pair of rockers at an estate sale last year and they are made of that polyethylene commonly called by the brand name of polywood. One had been the subject of a repair attempt that fell short, as you can see in the pic. I pulled some of the screws to see if there is a clear way to repair, but I am stumped. Material has that wax finish that will not let any adhesive I know of work. Thoughts? Before it goes to the dump? 

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What about that purple stuff the plumbers use on PVC sewer lines? I'd probably also add a few deck screws angled down from top to bottom. Drill a guide hole slightly smaller than the screw and load the screws up with the adhesive. 

 

Second idea, replace the pieces on both sides with a 2 x 4 ripped to match the pieces you replace.

 

Third idea, add a piece of exterior plywood with glue and screws from the floor rocker to the seat, From the pic I'm thinking this is the back leg of the rocker? Plywood could be added to the inside or the back. Blend it in with some light green paint. 

 

Good luck!

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Thanks guys. I think trying is a fool's errand. There are two chairs, and the broken leg is in the front. The other pic is of the good rocker. We have ample seats out there so while I probably try the purple primer with the PVC cement, I am not sure I want to trust it with family or guests....

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5 hours ago, nightfighter said:

I bought a pair of rockers at an estate sale last year and they are made of that polyethylene commonly called by the brand name of polywood. One had been the subject of a repair attempt that fell short, as you can see in the pic. I pulled some of the screws to see if there is a clear way to repair, but I am stumped. Material has that wax finish that will not let any adhesive I know of work. Thoughts? Before it goes to the dump? 

IMG_9152.JPG

IMG_9151.JPG

I mean if you're determined to fix it why not remove the broken piece and make a duplicate of wood?

Looks rather simple.

Screw it back together and be done.

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You're simply not going to glue polyethylene. You can weld it or mechanically join it. I'd drill for a 3/4" aluminum "dowel", cross pinned in place. You can drill loose since accuracy is tricky on stuff like this, and use epoxy as a mechanical filler between dowel and hole, then cross pin with a screw or roll pin after epoxy is cured. I like 10-32 hardened socket cap screws for pinning like this. 

 

Welding with a soldering iron or hot air welder would be hard without color matching filler stick. Possible though with random PE if you don't care and just have a mismatched color bead after you cut back bevels on both sides and fill.

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  • 3 weeks later...

INMO depends on how bad you wanna save it, gonna take some work., safest most secure way , is  brace it on a least 2 sides.

Piece of flat steel bar from homies, one piece in the front and one in the back, drill  holes , one above and below he crack all the way through use  1/4"  stainless steel lock nuts and bolts, or square steel tube and sleeve it.

 

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You've got multiple cracks - all near screw locations - maybe a result of factory over-tightening (or just age)?

 

That's going to be tough to fix in a way that makes it look like new.

 

You could try to contact the original company & ask what they recommend?

 

My guess is that you're better off keeping the 1 good chair, maybe saving the other for parts (or junking).

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