Jump to content

What size stripers are you catching?

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, MikeFlyGuy said:

History repeats  itself - the collapse in the 80's. 

 

 

Eerily similar for folks who lived thru that. The early to mid 80s went from very few baby bass to virtually no bass at all. I don't think we are close to the latter stage yet, but I still see some parallels.

Pfantum Pfishah

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, JimKu said:

 

 

1 hour ago, JimKu said:

Why do you want to catch smaller bass? 24 to 30” bass are lot more fun in my opinion. 
hope we’re not heading for a collapse

 

i haven’t been out yesterday for stripers. Any day now. 

Because smaller bass grow up to be bigger bass.  

Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 mins ago, zak-striper said:

 

A lot of smaller bass means there have been good spawning years in the recent past.

Exactly why I would not expect to see much in the way of micros.

 

The last few years have had below average hatch results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, JimKu said:

Why do you want to catch smaller bass? 24 to 30” bass are lot more fun in my opinion. 
hope we’re not heading for a collapse

 

i haven’t been out yesterday for stripers. Any day now. 

Because if they're not catching smaller bass, that absence of small fish today will mean even fewer larger fish in a few years.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last five years--2019-2023--represent the worst consecutive five years of recruitment in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay--even during the collapse of the late 1970s and early 1980s, no five-year average fell as low.

 

At the same time, the juvenile abundance index in the Virginia portion of the Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River were in the bottom 25% of their respective time series in the period 2021-2023.

 

The last three years on the Hudson River were a little better, with 2022 above average and 2021 below average, and 2023 the worst since 1985.

 

The bottom line is that we're looking at a good-sized hole in the size structure of the stock, that we'll be feeling for quite a few years into the future.

 

Fortunately, conditions look favorable for a strong Maryland spawn this year.  We'll know in October whether it happened.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...