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New Shark rules in NY

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BrianBM

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Today's Newsday had a short piece on new regulations for shark anglers. The ones that caught my eye pertain to shore anglers. No wire leaders longer than 18", no use of drones or kayaks to deploy baits. Cast it out, or stay home, I guess.

 

I assume this reflects new Federal regulations, somewhere along the line. Are similar regulations going into effect up and down the coast? I didn't notice mention of mandatory circle hooks. Is that already the rule? The gills of prohibited sharks must be kept submerged (boy, could COs write a lot of citations on THAT basis), you must have wire or bolt cutters. I don't fish for sharks but this would complicate what you need to carry, if you do.

 

For better comments, I summon .... Iron Chef ..... no,  @CWitek  !!!

 

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7 mins ago, BrianBM said:

Presumably you'll be on a beach, if you're shark fishing.

 

I have been hassled before by police fishing urban beaches even though I wasn't doing anything wrong. (not shark fishing though) Just another thing to worry about.

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7 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Today's Newsday had a short piece on new regulations for shark anglers. The ones that caught my eye pertain to shore anglers. No wire leaders longer than 18", no use of drones or kayaks to deploy baits. Cast it out, or stay home, I guess.

 

I assume this reflects new Federal regulations, somewhere along the line. Are similar regulations going into effect up and down the coast? I didn't notice mention of mandatory circle hooks. Is that already the rule? The gills of prohibited sharks must be kept submerged (boy, could COs write a lot of citations on THAT basis), you must have wire or bolt cutters. I don't fish for sharks but this would complicate what you need to carry, if you do.

 

For better comments, I summon .... Iron Chef ..... no,  @CWitek  !!!

 

 

This doesn't reflect federal regs, it's just another way for NY to be awful.

 

The dedicated shark guys from FL, TX, etc. would storm the capitol if this nonsense went into effect nation-wide.

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2 hours ago, Jefffahfffah said:

 

This doesn't reflect federal regs, it's just another way for NY to be awful.

 

The dedicated shark guys from FL, TX, etc. would storm the capitol if this nonsense went into effect nation-wide.

I agree with NY being awful but it’s not a terrible place to live and something had to be done about all the idiots.  The people are awful that’s the bigger problem learn to cast your rod. This is a good thing.  

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10 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Today's Newsday had a short piece on new regulations for shark anglers. The ones that caught my eye pertain to shore anglers. No wire leaders longer than 18", no use of drones or kayaks to deploy baits. Cast it out, or stay home, I guess.

 

I assume this reflects new Federal regulations, somewhere along the line. Are similar regulations going into effect up and down the coast? I didn't notice mention of mandatory circle hooks. Is that already the rule? The gills of prohibited sharks must be kept submerged (boy, could COs write a lot of citations on THAT basis), you must have wire or bolt cutters. I don't fish for sharks but this would complicate what you need to carry, if you do.

 

For better comments, I summon .... Iron Chef ..... no,  @CWitek  !!!

 

The answer is a bit complicated, because your questions touch on a number of different issues.  But I did have some input on the regulations during their development, given my history in the shark fishery generally, plus I was at the Marine Resources Advisory Council meetings when the proposed regulations were discussed.  So here goes.

 

1)  The new New York regulations reflect federal regulations that have been in place for at least 20 years, to the extent that New York's shore based shark fishery primarily targets what the feds have designated "prohibited species," in this case sandbar, dusky, and sand tiger sharks.  The first two species remain overfished, but are recovering.  Sandbars seem to be recovering pretty nicesly, with full rebuilding predicted for sometime around 2070.  Duskies were hit hard by the pelagic longline fleet, and not long ago were the subject of an endangered species petition which was ultimately denied.  They were very common up until the late 1980s/early 1990s, with some very large fish being caught.  Then the population crashed, and I didn't see one for a few decades.  Now, they're rebuilding slowly, although most of the fish are small, as one woujld expect in a population in the first stages of recovery.  The official, predicted date for full recovery is sometime in the second or third decade of the 22nd Century--I don't recall the year-- but when you get that far out, there is a lot of uncertainty in the extimates, and recent stock assessments have differed, predicting recovery in anywhere between 100 and 400 years.  Sand tigers haven't been subject to a formal stock assessment, but because of their inshore habitat, their vulnerability to inshore trawls and gill nets, and their habit of gulping baits, making even the use of circle hooks problematic, are considered vulnerable.

 

The DEC estimates that about 95% of the sharks caught by shore-based shark fishermen in New York belong to one of those three prohibited species which, pursuant to state law, may not be "taken," a term that includes not only harvest, but also targeted catch-and-release fishing.  Thus, by targeting species that were deemed "prohibited" by both federal and state regulators, New York's shore-based shark fishermen have already been been breaking the law for the past couple of decades, although enforcement has been difficult.  These regulations were drafted with consultation with the DEC's Marine Enforcement Unit, and are intended to both discourage fishing for prohibited species and make it easier to enforce the law against people who insist on violating it.

 

2)  Most Atlantic Coast states have adopted some sort of regulations intended to protect prohibited species.  Circle hooks and in-water release are commonly adopted.  Chumming restrictions have been adopted elsewhere.  Restrictions on drone use and such are less common. Some states, and some political subdivisions of others, have adopted bans on shore-based shark fishing during certain times of the year, or times of the day,   In Florida, where shore-based shark fishing is more popular than it is in most states, anglers are required to take a brief on-line course and obtain a permit before participating in the activity; there are also gear restrictions.  NMFS also requires both recreational and commercial fishermen to take a course (the recreational course is on-line, I believe that the commercial course is in person) on shark identification, handling, and release before being issued the appropriate Highly Migratory Species permit.

 

3)  Circle hooks became mandatory for shark fishing a few years ago, when the legislature passed the relevant statute.  Thus, there was no need to mention them in the regulations.  The proposed regulation included a maximum hook size to further discourage surf fishermen from targeting sharks, but after consulting with representatives from various surf fishing groups (I know LIBBA and the NY Coalition for Recreational Fishing were involved and there may have been others), who pointed out that larger hooks were regularly used when bait fishin for bass, the hook size restriction was deleted from the final regulation.

 

4)  The in-water release provisions were arguably the most important provisions of the entire regulatory package.  Far too many fishermen were causing too much stress to the sharks caught, dragging them up on the beach where their weight pressed down on their internal organs, dragging them around by their tails, which can damage the spinal coluimn, which is composed only of cartilege, not bone, keeping them out of water too long for photos, sitting on them, pulling their heads back at unnatural angles to show off the teeth for the camera, etc.  Although it hasn't made the papers, there have been quite a few dead sharks, mostly sand tigers, found washed up on the beach as a result of such mishandling.  The DEC necropsies such fish if they aren't too badly decayed, to determine whether gill nets, recreational fishing, or something else was the problem, and angling has been the cause of many prohibited shark deaths.

 

All in all, it's a good, enforceable set of regulations targeted at a specific problem:  The illegal targeting of prohibited shark species.  It will probably take a couple of well-publicised enforcement actions before the Internet heroes get the message, but I suspect that the message will ultimately be sent and received.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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10 hours ago, the3fishheads said:

Trump wouldn't put up with this ****.

 

Screenshot_20240418-113354_Chrome.jpg

Given has stated dislike of sharks, he'd probably be disappointed that somebody wasn't hitting it in the head with an ax.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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1 hour ago, hydraman said:

I agree with NY being awful but it’s not a terrible place to live and something had to be done about all the idiots.  

I was just there yesterday - yes it is and the idiots are in charge there

I just wanta play everyday despite small nagging injuries --

and go home to a woman who appreciates how full of crap I truly am. ~ Crash Davis

 

Social Distancing since 1962

 

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3 hours ago, Jefffahfffah said:

 

This doesn't reflect federal regs, it's just another way for NY to be awful.

 

The dedicated shark guys from FL, TX, etc. would storm the capitol if this nonsense went into effect nation-wide.

That's not exactly true, since about 95% of the non-dogfish sharks caught by New York's shore-based shark fishermen are either sandbars, duskies, or sand tigers, all of which are designated "prohibited species" by the National Marine Fisheries Service, which may not be legally retained (there is a small "scientific" fishery for sandbars which requires a special permit, but only a handful of boats are involved).

 

It has been illegal to target all three species in New York for many years, so New York's shore-based shark fishermen have been engaged in illegal activity for close to two decades.  The new rules only make the pre-existing regulations more enforceable.

 

As far as southern shark fishermen go,, Florida has already adopted some fairly restrictive regulations that requires anglers to take a brief course and obtain a special permit before shark fishing from shore; Florida has also instituted some gear restrictions.  But the thing to remember about the southern states is that they have a fishery that is dominated by non-prohibited species, including blacktips, spinners, tigers, bulls, and the various hammerheads, which may be legally taken (although it's debatable that the hammerheads, which are having populations problems and suffer high release mortality rates, belong on that list).  But the New York and southern shark fisheries aren't really comparable in terms of species caugght.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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