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New regulations governing shore-based shark fishing adopted

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New York hass adopted final regulations governing shore-based shark fishing.

 

Among other things, the regulations require in-water release (defined as keeping the fish in water deep enough to cover the gills); prohibits chumming within 600 feet of shore; requires baits to be cast and outlaws the use of drones, paddleboards, kayaks, etc to set baits out; requires prohibited species to be released immediately; requires fishermen to have a bolt cutter or tool capable of cutting wire leaders on hand; and limits wire leader length to 18 inches, along with a number of other provisions.

 

Details can be found here:  https://dec.ny.gov/news/press-releases/2024/4/dec-announces-new-gear-regulations-and-enhanced-shark-handling-requirements-for-marine-recreational-anglers

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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I like it .. I already adopted all those techniques minus the 18” leader .. soooo happy they putting a stop to droning and yaking out baits .. it’s does nothing good for the shark dragging it in from 2-300 yards out .. by the time they hit the beach they shot . Specially them big tigers here to pup .. 

Edited by Wire For Fire
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I still don’t really understand why browns are on the list though .. From my personal experiences and from what I hear from friends up and down the island and up even to mass they seem to be very abundant during the warm water months .. 

 

educate me please Charles

 

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Not interested in doing so by any means but the wording implies that a non protects species, for example a spinner shark, can be harvested from shore? I’ve seen Spinner and Blacktip sharks harvested in Florida fairly often and heard it was fairly good eating. Just curious 

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4 mins ago, Wire For Fire said:

I still don’t really understand why browns are on the list though .. From my personal experiences and from what I hear from friends up and down the island and up even to mass they seem to be very abundant during the warm water months .. 

 

educate me please Charles

 

While they're relatively abundant compared to some other species, they remain overfished.  Abundance started to decline back in the late 1980s/early 1990s, largely due to the impacts of bottom longlines in the South, and for a while, we weren't seeing any at all.  No-harvest rules put in place around 2000, give or take a couple of years, has allowed the population to begin to recover, but it's still quite a bitr lower than it should be.  Right now, complete recovery is expected sometime around 2070.

 

The problem is that, like a lot of the sharks of the Charcarhinidae, they mature late and only produce a few young at a time, making rebuilding a long process.

 

When I was in my early teens, in the late 1960s, sandbars were even relatively common in Long Island Sound, with bigger females--7 foot fork length--being caught in late summer as far west as Greenwich.  That hasn't happened in 50 years.  And when I started shark fishing seriously in the early 1980s, we'd often hook our first of the day before all of the lines were set out.  They're not back at those numbers yet, although they are certainly increasing.

 

The problem is that, while they look abundant today, that's only because most people forget what the fishery looked like 40 years ago.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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11 mins ago, HYB_Living said:

Not interested in doing so by any means but the wording implies that a non protects species, for example a spinner shark, can be harvested from shore? I’ve seen Spinner and Blacktip sharks harvested in Florida fairly often and heard it was fairly good eating. Just curious 

Yes.  Provided that they meet the minimum size, non-prohibited species may be harvestred from shore.

 

But the reality is that, off Long Island, over 95 percent of the non-dogfish sharks hooked are prohibited species.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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Yea thank you .. I would never ever ever kill one and definitely try hard not too.. they seem like very tough critters .. I’ve caught more then a few with nets and long line heavy mono wrapped on them and deeply embedded and still feeding and thriving .. I’d think a catch and release fishery with proper regs and rules followed would allow some summertime anglers some fun while doing minimal damage to the stock 

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I used to have fun going out in the summers almost all night fishing catching some big bass and giant sharks. Than something happened dudes with lights cameras started to show up at some spots. They started having whole photo shoots with these sharks and keeping them out of the water I could not understand since I’ve never had social media. Than I started seeing loads of dudes all summer during the day flying bates out and the same photo shoots keeping sharks out like 5 min sometimes. More than a few times I had to intervene and help release an almost dead shark. I almost always fish alone cast my bates and always felt like letting that big fish go quick after a good fight was what you just did. My gear was also up to par I use newells big ones and the fights we’re not very long but what I saw with these guys and the little reels and rods they used was crazy and I’m sure loads of sharks died. I had to stop because of all the nonsense it’s been some years now I stopped the shark game. Now I’m enjoying the fluke fishing in the summer and weakfish when I can find them. 

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9 mins ago, hydraman said:

I used to have fun going out in the summers almost all night fishing catching some big bass and giant sharks. Than something happened dudes with lights cameras started to show up at some spots. They started having whole photo shoots with these sharks and keeping them out of the water I could not understand since I’ve never had social media. Than I started seeing loads of dudes all summer during the day flying bates out and the same photo shoots keeping sharks out like 5 min sometimes. More than a few times I had to intervene and help release an almost dead shark. I almost always fish alone cast my bates and always felt like letting that big fish go quick after a good fight was what you just did. My gear was also up to par I use newells big ones and the fights we’re not very long but what I saw with these guys and the little reels and rods they used was crazy and I’m sure loads of sharks died. I had to stop because of all the nonsense it’s been some years now I stopped the shark game. Now I’m enjoying the fluke fishing in the summer and weakfish when I can find them. 

That pretty well describes why the regulations were needed.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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11 hours ago, the3fishheads said:

Any limit on gap size for non stainless inline circles? 

They were looking at 1 1/8 in but I don't see it in the new regs.

No, they decided not to go that way, because too many surfcasters said that they used hooks larger than that for bass, and the tackle shops claimed that it would leave them with too much unsellable inventory, because the most popular hooks, includingJ-hooks used for bluefish, were larger than the proposed maximum size.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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11 hours ago, Wire For Fire said:

Yea thank you .. I would never ever ever kill one and definitely try hard not too.. they seem like very tough critters .. I’ve caught more then a few with nets and long line heavy mono wrapped on them and deeply embedded and still feeding and thriving .. I’d think a catch and release fishery with proper regs and rules followed would allow some summertime anglers some fun while doing minimal damage to the stock 

With mandatory in-water release a release fishery might have worked, although merely targeting prohibited species constitutes an illegal "take."

 

While the fish can take some physical injury--I've caught some that looked as if they were semi-decapitated after being caught in gill nets--the damage they can't easily survive is just what they experience in the shore fishery--forcing them to bear their weight on their internal organs when pulled up on shore or into the shallows, because they lack a bony skeletal structure to support the weight, or being dragged around by their tails, which can easily damage the cartilege in their spinal column.

 

I've had to unwind heavy mono leaders from sharks that had developed deep spiral cuts in their skins from being entangled.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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