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3 hours ago, FoulHooker said:

Why because you like to play internet god?  Take your bull**** bell rd nonsense somewhere.

 

coyote GIF by Nat Geo Wild

 

 

Why is this ignoranus still here?

Edited by FizzyFish

" I did my worst, but I did it well "

 

 

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44 mins ago, ged said:

Deer are edge creatures. They thrive in the suburbs. They have very little hunting pressure in many suburban settings. 

I get the lack of human hunting pressure. My question is why don't the coyotes keep them in check. Conventional hunter's wisdom say coyotes are evil creatures that need to be destroyed. If that were true, I'd expect them to have a noticeable impact on the deer herd. I don't see that. 

 

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11 hours ago, bassmaster said:

Damn critters

Deers in yard, face to face with the woman last night takin dog put

Yelling at me cause the damn thing was right at the window. I slept through it.

There munchies on me shrubs

  So many in my area in harwich.

Herring river and conservation land behind me house don't help

Liquid Fence deer and rabbit spray works pretty good to keep them from eating shrubs. You can get it at Home Depot. You have to respray after heavy rain though which unfortunately is very often lately. 

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11 hours ago, bassmaster said:

Damn critters

Deers in yard, face to face with the woman last night takin dog put

Yelling at me cause the damn thing was right at the window. I slept through it.

There munchies on me shrubs

  So many in my area in harwich.

Herring river and conservation land behind me house don't help

 

Screenshot_20240319_200819_Gallery.jpg

troll #122  <*)))<

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, mikez2 said:

I get the lack of human hunting pressure. My question is why don't the coyotes keep them in check. Conventional hunter's wisdom say coyotes are evil creatures that need to be destroyed. If that were true, I'd expect them to have a noticeable impact on the deer herd. I don't see that. 

 

What you said^^^

 

Coyotes can't keep the deer herds in check for a host of reasons. The primary reason being, deer are able to reproduce faster than the coyotes can prey on them.

Nobody cares if fox, owls, hawks and bobcat eat mice, rabbits, squirrels or chipmunks. Deer hunters don't hunt those.  Deer hunters want deer. They want them all to themselves.  Since coyotes eat deer, they become the Boogie man. 

 

Without a doubt, coyotes take down deer. But I'll bet a lot of those deer are weak, injured or wounded.  In over 40 years of deer hunting I've yet to see a coyote chasing a deer. I've seen dobermans, farm dogs, and even highly trained bird dogs chase deer into another zip code. 

 

In the last week within 5 miles of my home Ive seen at least 15 deer, well over 50 turkey, geese, and yes, several coyotes.   

Another reason the deer are thriving is they've become increasingly adept at literally living among us. In small patches of woods, and behind homes.  I have deer living behind my home by the RR bridge, along with coyotes, rabbits and the neighbors cat.

 

The Sultan of Sluggo

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4 hours ago, mikez2 said:

I get the lack of human hunting pressure. My question is why don't the coyotes keep them in check. Conventional hunter's wisdom say coyotes are evil creatures that need to be destroyed. If that were true, I'd expect them to have a noticeable impact on the deer herd. I don't see that. 

 


The sentiment about coyotes comes from the days when there weren't any deer around most of Massachusetts and New ENgland..
The deer herd we have now is not even exageratingly 100x what it was just 50 years ago.    
When there are only 2 to 3 deer per square mile, if a coyote takes even a couple fawns, that's an impact.  Currently the target population for most of SEMASS for example is 10 deer per square mile, and we have been over that for many years now.

 

But coyotes don't really eat as many deer as people would think.  They aren't efficient at killing adult deer and  probably eat more voles  and woodchucks by pound than venison.   They're more opportunists and not apex predators.  So as a population control vector, they aren't very reliable in an environment like ours.  
 

It is probably safer to say that the deer population increase over the years allowed for a coyote population increase.   With more deer, that's more fawns, more deer to get wounded and sick, shot and lost by hunters... or gut piles left in the woods by successful hunters...so many more easier meals for the yotes.    

THe coyote population actually crashed in much of New England a number of years ago, by a lot.  I was told it was most likely because the population got so large that heartworm from domestic dogs was easily transmitted and wiped out a lot of them.

DITCH TROLL
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2 hours ago, bob_G said:

I have deer living behind my home by the RR bridge, along with coyotes, rabbits and the neighbors cat.

 


I'm now living in a pretty heavily settled section of West Warwick.   There are only tiny patches of woods and houses back to back and you can hit your neighbor with a football if you throw it out your window.     There's a herd of deer almost a dozen strong now that goes from house to house every night munching on shrubs and flower gardens.   I have to spray my shrubs with deer and rabbit repellent and you'd laugh at me doing it if you saw my neighborhood.    

DITCH TROLL
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19 mins ago, pogie_boy said:


The sentiment about coyotes comes from the days when there weren't any deer around most of Massachusetts and New ENgland..
The deer herd we have now is not even exageratingly 100x what it was just 50 years ago.    
When there are only 2 to 3 deer per square mile, if a coyote takes even a couple fawns, that's an impact.  Currently the target population for most of SEMASS for example is 10 deer per square mile, and we have been over that for many years now.

 

But coyotes don't really eat as many deer as people would think.  They aren't efficient at killing adult deer and  probably eat more voles  and woodchucks by pound than venison.   They're more opportunists and not apex predators.  So as a population control vector, they aren't very reliable in an environment like ours.  
 

It is probably safer to say that the deer population increase over the years allowed for a coyote population increase.   With more deer, that's more fawns, more deer to get wounded and sick, shot and lost by hunters... or gut piles left in the woods by successful hunters...so many more easier meals for the yotes.    

THe coyote population actually crashed in much of New England a number of years ago, by a lot.  I was told it was most likely because the population got so large that heartworm from domestic dogs was easily transmitted and wiped out a lot of them.

Great read.

The Sultan of Sluggo

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18 mins ago, pogie_boy said:


The sentiment about coyotes comes from the days when there weren't any deer around most of Massachusetts and New ENgland..
The deer herd we have now is not even exageratingly 100x what it was just 50 years ago.    
When there are only 2 to 3 deer per square mile, if a coyote takes even a couple fawns, that's an impact.  Currently the target population for most of SEMASS for example is 10 deer per square mile, and we have been over that for many years now.

 

But coyotes don't really eat as many deer as people would think.  They aren't efficient at killing adult deer and  probably eat more voles  and woodchucks by pound than venison.   They're more opportunists and not apex predators.  So as a population control vector, they aren't very reliable in an environment like ours.  
 

It is probably safer to say that the deer population increase over the years allowed for a coyote population increase.   With more deer, that's more fawns, more deer to get wounded and sick, shot and lost by hunters... or gut piles left in the woods by successful hunters...so many more easier meals for the yotes.    

THe coyote population actually crashed in much of New England a number of years ago, by a lot.  I was told it was most likely because the population got so large that heartworm from domestic dogs was easily transmitted and wiped out a lot of them.

That makes a lot of sense.

In my frequent woods rambles I rarely see evidence of adult deer killed. Most of what I have read suggests they take mostly fawns.

I would imagine car strikes provide a large quantity of venison for them to scavenge. Easy meat with no effort or risk to acquire. 

 

I was not aware that there had been a crash in the population of coyotes. I know in the past 10 - 20 years mange was really bad in my area. We used to see some nasty looking ones. Don't see it as much anymore although I did see a mangy fox last summer. 

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