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Tell me about April togging.....

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I've never done it, but finished last season with an absolute addiction and am ready to get back on them.  I know conventional wisdom says fish move deeper when the water cools, but I was catching very well in 8-12ft into late November, so I'm wondering if our local fish might not neccesarily move offshore like they do in other areas.  Also thinking that if they did, where would they go?  The eastern 2/3rds of the sound is pretty much just sand once you get more than a half-mile or so off the beach.  Are the millions of local fish really huffing it out of the sound and truly heading offshore?

 

Generally-speaking though, how is the April bite?  Is it non-stop action and easy limits like the fall, or do you need to work at it?

I've done stuff I ain't proud of, and the stuff I am proud of is disgusting.

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When you putting the boat in?

I do it - I'll show you.

Sometimes we do Will's tin boat, right up tight to the rocks, probably 6 - 10 feet deep.

We always limit , but I think it's 2 fish in April.

Sometimes it's tough getting crabs, but Andy usually has them.  

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59 mins ago, Billybob said:

When you putting the boat in?

I do it - I'll show you.

Sometimes we do Will's tin boat, right up tight to the rocks, probably 6 - 10 feet deep.

We always limit , but I think it's 2 fish in April.

Sometimes it's tough getting crabs, but Andy usually has them.  

 

 

I can't get into the slip until mid-April, but would be up for trailering it down if we get a nice day earlier in the month.

 

So they're still in really skinny water even though it's cold huh?

I've done stuff I ain't proud of, and the stuff I am proud of is disgusting.

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1 hour ago, EBHarvey said:

 

 

I can't get into the slip until mid-April, but would be up for trailering it down if we get a nice day earlier in the month.

 

So they're still in really skinny water even though it's cold huh?

Yeah call me there’s thing everybody does 

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3 hours ago, oldbucket said:

Once the water hits 50 degrees the fish become active. Look for places that the sun can warm areas up faster ex. Jetty’s and mud flats.  

 

 

interesting......then they never really go anywhere, they're just not active.

I've done stuff I ain't proud of, and the stuff I am proud of is disgusting.

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On 3/11/2024 at 4:11 PM, EBHarvey said:

 

 

I can't get into the slip until mid-April, but would be up for trailering it down if we get a nice day earlier in the month.

 

So they're still in really skinny water even though it's cold huh?

They come near to spawn within that same week every year. I personally learn that more recently, they are there even if water temp isn't warmed enough. They are there but just not actively eating. So much to learn about them.

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On 3/11/2024 at 4:11 PM, EBHarvey said:

 

 

I can't get into the slip until mid-April, but would be up for trailering it down if we get a nice day earlier in the month.

 

So they're still in really skinny water even though it's cold huh?

 

On 3/12/2024 at 6:10 AM, oldbucket said:

Once the water hits 50 degrees the fish become active. Look for places that the sun can warm areas up faster ex. Jetty’s and mud flats.  

This^^^^

The water in the OCMD Inlet was right at 50-51 degrees today and the bite was MUCH better than last week. They were in 20-30' of water.

"The sea, the great unifier, is man's only hope. Now, as never before,
the old phrase has a literal meaning: We are all in the same boat."
Jacques Cousteau

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's exactly the same but completely different from fall fishing. Not being a smartass here, but this is how I've found it to be and love the spring bite. Everyone says 50 degrees for them to get moving, but that's at the surface and the bottom is often much, much colder and more consistent day to day and I have found it not to be a hard rule by any means. Just look to the winter fishery off the mid-Atlantic and the 50-degree "rule" goes out the window pretty quick. Bait wise, the same stuff works as the fall but you don't have as many bait stealers like choggies and scup around yet so it's easier to fish soft baits. The benefit I have found to soft bait, especially fresh clams, is the scent trail they emit. A crab can get washed out pretty quickly. This is no big deal in the fall when the fish are more active and competitively feeding, but in the spring I find the snotty smelly tasty clam gets more bites some days. I have had many days where I could feel the fish working its way up the clam to the jig and then just sitting there chewing on it all and I could set the hook whenever I was ready.

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  • 3 weeks later...

went out today despite the wind blowing up on me last minute.  tucked in tight to a breakwall and managed one fat 20" fish that only came out of his hole for a huge, whole green crab.

 

water was only 43 degrees, and with forecasted lows in the 30's for the next few nights I don't see that improving much before the season closes on the 30th.  

 

bummer.  the fall was so epic I was really pumped to pick up where I left off, but I guess spring is a different animal.

I've done stuff I ain't proud of, and the stuff I am proud of is disgusting.

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