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Can't find no video on youtube on these. I found this video on a silicone style popovics recipe for a lip and you don't need to tie a changer to get the body movement if u use these lipps I think. 

 

I have an idea, might be a little crazy. What if we hold that lip in a pliers and apply a little heat to the plastic. Can we bend it up to make a diving flying on it? 

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similar.......Anyone ever try these ?    Bob Pop sweared by them.

 

 

Currently have aphasia.    Aphasia is a result of my head stroke causing a bleed.   Happened in my Maine vacation in July (2021).   Lucky me less than 1% of people get stroke aphasia.  :(      I'm making project but have been told this is easily 5 months to 1 year for this to improve.   Until then hope you don't mind making sense with what I text.   HT

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What did Bob P swear?

Quite a rack of goodies behind him in the last shots.

Morone Saxatilis... God put them in the Surf to take them, not in the freaking boat!

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Pop P would swear by the Pulse Disk.   (the original owner, friend of Pop P, died 5 or 6 years ago)

 

HT

 

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Currently have aphasia.    Aphasia is a result of my head stroke causing a bleed.   Happened in my Maine vacation in July (2021).   Lucky me less than 1% of people get stroke aphasia.  :(      I'm making project but have been told this is easily 5 months to 1 year for this to improve.   Until then hope you don't mind making sense with what I text.   HT

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1 hour ago, fishfinder401 said:

Will tried the bugger today and it just spins... Maybe it was the upturned eye

I tried various lips on some of my flies and it was tough to keep them from spinning.  I eventually gave up on them.  

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I would imagine these work like lipped lures. You will need to have a lot of resistance at the top of the lip at the front of the fly to push water. Buoyancy helps to - so foam, deer hair etc. Its this that counters the flow from the lip and makes the lure/fly wobble. If the lip is too big and there is not enough resistance to counter this, it will spin.

 

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6 hours ago, JRT said:

I would imagine these work like lipped lures. You will need to have a lot of resistance at the top of the lip at the front of the fly to push water. Buoyancy helps to - so foam, deer hair etc. Its this that counters the flow from the lip and makes the lure/fly wobble. If the lip is too big and there is not enough resistance to counter this, it will spin.

 

Interesting, never thought it could be a reaistance issue

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I've been making lipped flies for decades and construct my own lips. I've never used store bought Flylipps. I use lipped flies almost exclusively at night. There are several things to consider -  size/surface area of the lip, weight and size the hook(s), amount of buoyancy in the fly and it's shape, and the length of the longish tail. It takes a bit of experimentation to get it right. But there are some general rules one can follow:

 

1. For lipped flies in fast moving current, one will need to use two hooks articulated together. The added keeling effect of the second hook is needed to keep the fly from spinning. (That notion came from a fly called the Magic Minnow in Fly Tyer magazine, I believe, many years ago.)  In fast current, one hook will just be too unstable. One can get away with a single hook for a lipped fly though in still water, but the surface area of the lip has to be within reason relative to the size and weight of the hook and materials the fly is constructed with. (Note to fishfinder401. The case of the wooly bugger with the lip and the bend of the hook going in opposite directions - those two orientations are totally working against each other. The hook and lip need to be in the same orientation below the shank for stability for the fly to wiggle below the surface. You can make a nice gurgler that way though if the fly floats!) 

 

2. Say you add feathers for a tail. They can be only so long. The lip generates a wave pattern but if the feathers are too long, the wave will dissipate by the time it reaches the end of the tail. When that happens, the head of the fly will wiggle, but the tip of the tail won't. You can shorten the feathers, or make a bigger lip which will generate a bigger wave to traverse the length of the fly, but in the latter case, the size of the lip has to remain within the limits of your casting ability.  I guess what I'm saying is, a lipped castable fly is never going to be 10 inches long unless you pull out the 14 wt. Maybe around 6 inches with a 10 wt. In the pic below, I can cast the single hook ones with a 6 wt.

 

3. Cylindrical shapes of a lipped fly are more stable than oblong shapes positioned vertically. 

 

4. I use cylinder foam quite a bit for lipped flies. It's very buoyant stuff, too buoyant in fact depending on the diameter, and without added weight the fly will rise too quickly in the water column. So I will add weight to make my lipped flies as neutrally buoyant as possible but a little rise is ok; the leader will dampen rise too. I've also used lobster pot buoy foam which is denser and heavier than store bought foam cylinders, so not as much weight needs to be added. But it takes more time to construct the fly.  I also use foam sheet crease fly style. And finally, back in the day, I also used deer hair to tie bodies. Deer hair was probably the best material but oh my gosh, so much more work. How much weight to add to gain neutral buoyancy if needed depends on the material and amount used - once again experimentation will be needed. When I use these flies at night in relative still water, they get paused and allowed to sit for a little bit. Some nights the strikes occur during the pause. 

 

5. I use a lot of epoxy to build around the lip to give it more durability. You are bound to hit things behind you on the back cast and you don't want the fly falling apart easily.

 

I've probably raised a lot more questions than answers. There's a lot involved. When I get more time, I'll write up step by step construction plans on how these are made if anyone is interested.

 

 

 

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I've made a few flies with the lips, used a marabou body and used zonker strip for a tail. They didn't spin, perhaps because of the weight of the wet rabbit skin? On about my third cast I saw the torpedo wake of a good sized pickerel approaching the yellow one from the picture below very quickly, felt not even a slight twitch as it cleanly snipped my leader and watched it head back into the flooded brush with my bright yellow fly trailing along from its jaw. I've also made some of those pulse disks (though without that patented name) from a 2 liter soda bottle. I heated a bodkin with a lighter and used it to make the holes. I haven't used those yet, they're sitting in a drawer in my fly tying room. I'll have to remember to put them to use this spring. 

FlyLips.jpeg

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