Jump to content

More bad news about the striped bass population

Rate this topic


HKJonathan

Recommended Posts

This article is mostly cherry picked information from ASMFC with some bogus quotes from a charter boat captain (Rockfish Charters) saying “fishing has never been better.” 

 

Not a lot specifically about the Hudson stock, which seems to continue to be poorly understood compared to the larger Chesapeake stock. Lumping the two together in modeling and management is dangerous without understanding how their populations differ. How many Hudson fish are really out there now, nobody knows…

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What the feck is a “ fisher”? As to the OP , a season opener of June 1 ALL bass fishing in the Hudson would be a help!!

IN FAVOR OF COMMERCIAL FISHING AND SURFING THE NORTH SIDE

MAY THE RICH GET RICHER!!

FISH ARE FOOD!!

UA MAU KA EA O KA AINA IKA PONO O HAWAII

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bring back the license! Then the DEC etc can quickly sort/remove/ fine, non compliant individuals. 
 Between language barriers, and trying to explain the Marine Registry, they are almost powerless.

Tis better to remain silent and thought the fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, cheech said:

Bring back the license! Then the DEC etc can quickly sort/remove/ fine, non compliant individuals. 
 Between language barriers, and trying to explain the Marine Registry, they are almost powerless.

The guaranteed lawsuits with the East End Townships killed the license proposal last time , thank God!

IN FAVOR OF COMMERCIAL FISHING AND SURFING THE NORTH SIDE

MAY THE RICH GET RICHER!!

FISH ARE FOOD!!

UA MAU KA EA O KA AINA IKA PONO O HAWAII

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"To be sure, stricter measures are necessary to ensure growth, vitality, stability, and resiliency in striped bass populations, which are contracting and simultaneously experiencing expanded fishing pressure. Previous management measures and best practices employed by anglers to improve survivability when releasing fish have been ineffective in curtailing mortality as fishing pressure surged. Data from the ASMFC reveals that recreational mortality increased by 32 percent in 2022 from the previous year. The increased mortality rates on declining populations of striped bass restricts stock rebuilding goals and reduces the likelihood of achieving threshold levels of the spawning stock biomass as mandated by ASMFC.

 

In our letter to the ASMFC, we stressed that recovery of the Hudson’s striped bass population is contingent upon reduced mortality rates within the stocks and a proportional growth of the forage fish base that striped bass need to support themselves. As the East Coast’s premier saltwater gamefish, any rebound in striped bass populations is also dependent upon a balanced ecosystem approach to fisheries management that ensures sufficient and thriving populations of forage fish remain in the water prior to the assignment of human quotas. While reducing mortality rates on the spawning stock biomass of striped bass is critical to promote population growth, any resurgence in stripers must be accompanied by proportionate increases in forage fishes, as a rising biomass cannot thrive in a vacuum.

Sadly, the entire suite of the Hudson’s most iconic species are in long-term decline. In 2023, striped bass experienced their worst spawning season since 1995. Additionally, river herring, American shad, American eels, Atlantic sturgeon, shortnose sturgeon, and tomcod all use the Hudson River or its tributaries to renew their population in freshwater, but are all currently experiencing depleted populations at historically low levels. At Riverkeeper, we are working to reverse these trends and remove obsolete dams to restore ancestral and critical habitat for river herring, American shad, American eels, and a host of other native fishes that require freshwater or connection to the Hudson’s tributaries as all or part of their lifecycle. Recent research shows that 80 percent of all river herring spawning habitat lies upstream of obsolete dams. For shad, the percentages are not much better. American shad returning to the Hudson are fast declining and have failed recruitment in 22 of the past 23 years, despite a moratorium on fishing within the river. To counter these trends and truly benefit striped bass, we urgently need to restore freshwater habitat for the suite of migratory forage species and reduce bycatch in the ocean for river herring, American shad, and Atlantic sturgeon."

More detailed commentary from Riverkeeper who were quoted in the article. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan, have you sent a donation to Menhaden Defenders?

 

JerseyJeb, I have have no idea what this even means? "But when you run your fisheries management with razor thin margins".  Then you went on a tirade in regards to the Hudson River.. I thought the original discussion was about the SB spawn last year?  Like 7 out of the last 10 years were pretty darn good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...