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Slo-Mo video of line going thru guides

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HL

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There was a video of fly line going through guidestat was very informative for guide placement and # of guides.

It was posted by a member from a Scandinavian country - think name is Esos - or something like that.

Would love to see it again.

Herb

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Herb, can you explain to me why flyrod guides are so much smaller proportionally compared to spinning or conventional guide to line diameter ratios?  Sorry if this is too 101, but I have always wondered about it and the thought of this video you are looking brought the question to mind.  Small guides....more friction right?

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Puppet,

Maybe the following will explain. The latest concept calls for smaller guides.

But, my experience other than fly rods is close t nili.

Herb

 

 

Guides are selected based on the guide layout you’ve decided on for your blank. Different layouts have their own benefits, and some are better suited for specific types of fishing.

 

Cone of Flight

The cone of flight layout has long been used for spinning rods and uses increasingly smaller rod guides to gradually narrow the “cone of flight” as the line nears the tip. This system generally uses fewer total guides than other layouts, but the problem with this system is that large, heavy guides usually are used. Many builders, when they test-cast rods, find that the cone of flight system doesn’t improve casting distance when compared to the “new guide concept” layout.

 

New Guide Concept

The “concept” layout, popularized by guide manufacturer Fuji, uses significantly smaller guides than the cone of flight layout, but also requires more rod guides. This system is thought to increase casting distance with braided lines on spinning reels. Because braided lines come off the spool with less memory than monofilament, there is no need for a “cone of flight” layout to gradually restrict the line until it leaves the tip. By quickly restricting the braid, extraneous movement is eliminated and casting distance increases. Along this line of thinking, some builders, preferring to use less guides, have adapted the cone of flight layout to use smaller guides to better suit the properties of braided line.
Other benefits of the concept layout include a lighter, more sensitive rod and a smaller “footprint” on the rod blank, which allows the rod the bend more naturally. The downside is that there are more small guides that could potentially be damaged or broken. Also, the small guides don’t pass knots or splices through them quite as well, and they ice up more easily in freezing-cold weather.

 

Micro Guides

Micro rod guides have recently become popular with freshwater anglers. These extremely tiny guides add minimal weight and have the smallest possible footprint on the rod. Micro guides can be used on both spinning and baitcasting outfits. To give you an idea of the size of the micro guides, you could probably fit 10 of the 4.5 size, commonly used as running guides, on a dime!

 

 

Edited by TimS
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6 hours ago, HL said:

There was a video of fly line going through guidestat was very informative for guide placement and # of guides.

It was posted by a member from a Scandinavian country - think name is Esos - or something like that.

Would love to see it again.

Herb

 

Esa? I think his screen name was Crunch.

"We fish for pleasure; I for Mine, you for yours."
-- James Leisenring
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6 hours ago, HL said:

There was a video of fly line going through guidestat was very informative for guide placement and # of guides.

It was posted by a member from a Scandinavian country - think name is Esos - or something like that.

Would love to see it again.

Herb

 

Searching on Crunch and the keywords I found this one. This might be the one you are thinking at. But the video link is dead: 

 

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Herb I tried looking in Google, but no joy. Fwiw the fly line goes screaming  through the stripper guide at an angle before having to double back to pass through the next guide up. In the past solution was a line tamer.guide. Three guides closely spaced. I did it.on a 10 wt. It looks ugly. It is time consuming and expensive.  Did not add any performance. 

Mike

 

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Mike,

Hi - hope you're well.

I remember the video very well - as you describe.

I was more interested what happened down the line towards the runners.

Had an interesting conversation with a blank customer. He told me that he uses 13 guides on a 9'0" rod.

Claims that Mike McCoy of Snakebrand put 13 (+) guides on a competition 9'6" #5 and caster set world record of 160+ feet.

Claims better line flow.

I wondered if slo-mo video showed line flowing straight through runners - or it popped in and out between runners.

If the line did, in fact, pop in and out of runners - than more runners may be warranted.

Herb

PS - 15 + years ago I also installed a "Tamer" - waste of time and money.

Edited by HL
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@HL
 what I was asking was more directed to flyrods,  our lines, and the tiny guides we have to the relative line diameter to guide ID ratio. Our running lines are pretty thick and friction zaps line speed.

 

Interesting notes you are discussing about adding more guides. I guess it is hard to call fly running line....line.  It is more like cable and can have memory depending on conditions.   Sounds like a tough engineering issue.

 

 

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Herb 13 guides and we were debating wire verses ceramic recently. If blank is customised to take extra mass of more guides ok I get that..Rods are not rated  to any std. We can build any blank we want and give it any rating we want.Except length is controlled by regs.  In competition fly casting its the line that is subject to strict controls.  Control verses friction. Be interesting if the caster had identical rods except for number of guides and see if there was any difference in distance. 

Mike

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What the hell, Herb, you mean you’ve not got an Ultrawave rod yet ?  Note it uses REC guides!

 

IMG_4095.webp
 

In seriousness, the guy pushing these at one point had a slo mo video of his rod vs a normal rod.

Quite a bit less line sag during shooting if I recall correctly, but the link to the video no longer works.  

Edited by numbskull
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2 hours ago, numbskull said:

What the hell, Herb, you mean you’ve not got an Ultrawave rod yet ?  Note it uses REC guides!

 

IMG_4095.webp
 

In seriousness, the guy pushing these at one point had a slo mo video of his rod vs a normal rod.

Quite a bit less line sag during shooting if I recall correctly, but the link to the video no longer works.  

Numb,

The same customer who is in favor of 13 guides LOVES his 18/8 Microwave stripper.

Yeah - it might allow the line to flow smoother through the guides after the Micrwave - but there has to he a ton of friction going through the #8 portion of the stripper.

tempted to try one to see if i'm correct. They don't make pure Ti though.

Anyone here ever try one?
Herb

PS - Ooooops - you wrote Ultrawave - not Microwave.

read about the Ultrawave rod - wierd!!!

Edited by HL
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