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Bucktail Advice

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S Hook

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Have caught a lot of stripers off the beach with plugs and bait but oddly enough, I’ve never given bucktails a try. Usually casting plugs between two and 4 ounces so I picked up some of these 2 oz bucktails  and 5” tails.  I figured with my 11 foot 2 to 5 ounce set up that I’d need 2 ounces to get out there.
 

I fish off sandy beaches exclusively, New Jersey coast.  Quite a bit of current during incoming and outgoing tides where I fish.  Am I going too heavy or are they going to be about right? Thanks.

 

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Edited by S Hook
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Ounces depend on the current, depth of water, wind, bait present, and under water obstacles. You want a buck tail heavy enough to cast with distance & ease, but light enough to keep from hitting bottom. I know it's not the most pronounced definition, but bucktails are a basic lure. They look like everything and resemble nothing. All the bucktail action is imparted by you, not the lure. Take the lightest one you have, cast out, retrieve at a nominal pace without sliding in current or hitting bottom, twitch every now & then, like a needle plug. Try tipping it with a curly tail. I've come to realize that Montauk is good for 1.5oz, jetties 2+oz, and open beach 3/4-1oz. If your concerned about color, go with white. You will also need to know the wire gauge of the hook & the amount of hair. The more hair the better. Stays more buoyant, allowing to go heavier in weight. Bucktail, one of my favorite, go to lures.

Too add, I prefer bullet style bullet style heads to the open lip types. 

Edited by Fishtale7

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Tailor the weight of the bucktail to the depth, sweep, wash and wind. In most surf casting applications bucktails between 3/4oz and 1.5 oz are appropriate. You want your jig "floating" just over the contours of the bottom structure, ticking occasionally while not dragging.

 

Heavier jigs are reserved for fishing deeper waters, wind and whitewater. 2-3 oz jigs can be worked through stormfronts, punching into the wind while jigs in the 4oz and up range are generally reserved for very deep and fast moving waters. The Cape Cod Canal and larger breqchwayd for instance.

Chasing false echoes

Send lawyers, guns, and money - Zevon

When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - Thompson 

 

DITCH TROLL 333

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3 mins ago, Jig It said:

Also, look into eye placement on the buck tails. Some of them are moved so far back they are probably for boat fishing. 

Good call!! Been fishing Andrus style for so long, I forgot about other makers types.

- Life is a waiting room, I hope they don't call me soon...... 

- Thomas Jefferson - "The course of history shows that as government grows, liberty decreases"

Our flag doesn’t fly because the wind that moves it. It flies with the breath of every fallen solider who protected it.

                                   

                                    

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22 mins ago, Jig It said:

Also, look into eye placement on the buck tails. Some of them are moved so far back they are probably for boat fishing. 

Exactly. That and the hair density and head shape play a major role alongside weight in determining how a jig will fish.

Chasing false echoes

Send lawyers, guns, and money - Zevon

When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - Thompson 

 

DITCH TROLL 333

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While bucktails are super versatile, you will need to understand the particular beaches you are fishing. Knowing where things like cuts, and troughs are will help you find the fish, but you will need to throw a weight that will best put that bait in the strike zone. Fish will set up in these places and wait for bait to be flushed out on the outgoing tide. These places can constantly be changing too due to tides and storms, so you will have to learn to look for them at low tide. Finding the right weight is the key to being successful in any location when fishing a bucktail. A matter of a few feet can completely take you out of the strike zone.

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Getting into bucktailing will change your productivity and you understanding of presentation. Of all books I ever bought about surfcasting, skinners fishing the bucktail was really the only one that has made marked impact on my surfcasting.  It is a simple and quick read, but covers so much more than what any of us can write in this thread.

 

Also, porkrind and commercial trailer strips are dead to me since I have switched to the absorber.

 

More info here...

https://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/720929-chamois-tails-bucktailin/#comment-12986204

 

Edited by puppet
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12 mins ago, puppet said:

Getting into bucktailing will change your productivity and you understanding of presentation. Of all books I ever bought about surfcasting, skinners fishing the bucktail was really the only one that has made marked impact on my surfcasting.  It is a simple and quick read, but covers so much more than what any of us can write in this thread.

 

Also, porkrind and commercial trailer strips are dead to me since I have switched to the absorber.

 

More info here...

https://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/720929-chamois-tails-bucktailin/#comment-12986204

 

Yes! Read that skinner book if your a new bucktailer. The best bucktailing book I’ve ever read…

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1 hour ago, fishguy62 said:

Yes! Read that skinner book if your a new bucktailer. The best bucktailing book I’ve ever read…

I watched the John Skinner, "Bucktail" video on Youtube.  Very good.

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