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Slotted Rotor Cups - Name One Advantage?

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SC

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9 hours ago, liambrouillette said:

I don't understand how the slots can cause splashing

Reel partially submerged during retrieve or incoming waves (containing sandy, gritty water). In addition I can't see a side slotted rotor cup (underwater egg beater) not increasing reeling "resistance" compared to a slick-sided, non slotted, back drilled rotor.

Edited by SC
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14 hours ago, ged said:

For the record, I had the first generation bolt on side cover VS300. For anyone that hasn’t had one, it was bigger than the next version. It is a very cool reel, but parts are not available. I finally sold mine to a collector in the Mid-West. Member here that may have 4 of these first generation VS300 reels. 

I believe the 300 were bolt on up til sn 600 something. A slightly different flat gray color. People fished them at Montauk. Somewhere I have a couple that I bought from people that hated them. To me they are like the Penn International 6. (Only 1000 made) A cool retro reel, that never was what the fisherman or the collector really wanted and market pricing reflects that. You can buy a bolt on on EBay for less than the price of a new VSX2.

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14 mins ago, Busanga said:

What does it mean timed to 4 o clock. ?

Handle at 4 o'clock with spool fully extended when viewed profile from handle side. (Righty reel handle turned with left hand). This provides the least chance of handle/rotating head movement during the cast. 6 o'clock is only better on the internet, test fot yourself.

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2 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

Slotted rotors along the side wall clear debris and water by taking advantage of centrifugal force.  Reduced weight of that part lowers startup inertia.  

 

And 

It looks custom

 

To add to this, there is an added aesthetic element and potential savings in material....that is if the parts are cast or scrap can be recycled. Shipping costs might add up too if the reel is manufactured at high volume.

 

The debris clearing is a thing. Legacy Van Staals have a pretty tight tolerance between spool and rotor cup. It keeps large debris out and the slots allow small debris to drain.  Anyone using a penn 704z   understands the term coffee grinder because once sand gets in it has no place to go and needs to be ground until it is flushed out...thecway it came in.

 

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1 hour ago, SC said:

Handle at 4 o'clock with spool fully extended when viewed profile from handle side. (Righty reel handle turned with left hand). This provides the least chance of handle/rotating head movement during the cast. 6 o'clock is only better on the internet, test fot yourself.

Not to derail thread.. but why do you need to time it with spool fully extended.  I would think it needs to be timed (4 or 6 or whatever) with the bail roller closest to rod/reel seat.

Just checked my Stella SW 18k. Handle at 4pm with bail roller closest to reel seat.. the spool is almost fully in. Sorry for question ,learning here.  May be if gets too deep discussion, will start another thread. 

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9 mins ago, Busanga said:

Not to derail thread.. but why do you need to time it with spool fully extended.  I would think it needs to be timed (4 or 6 or whatever) with the bail roller closest to rod/reel seat.

Just checked my Stella SW 18k. Handle at 4pm with bail roller closest to reel seat.. the spool is almost fully in. Sorry for question ,learning here.  May be if gets too deep discussion, will start another thread. 

Typically we want handle down 6pm and spool out.

 

Spool out makes less contact with the rotor cup and thus less friction.  handle down on a cast will be less likely to move during casting force.

 

I personally doubt this will increase much on a cast.  How I fish, I am not distance casting.

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1 hour ago, puppet said:

Typically we want handle down 6pm and spool out.

 

Spool out makes less contact with the rotor cup and thus less friction.  handle down on a cast will be less likely to move during casting force.

 

I personally doubt this will increase much on a cast.  How I fish, I am not distance casting.

Ah got you ,thanks!  I forgot on VS type reels their is rotor cup. On Stella SW not. So doesn't matter where spool is I guess. Just where handle is and line roller is in relation to finger etc. 

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