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Hudson River spawn numbers not good

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Had to remove some link text embedded in the article but you'll get the gist.

 

 

Each year since 1985, the has recorded a Young of Year (YOY) Striped Bass Abundance survey using equipment including a 500-foot haul seine net and electrofishing practices in the Hudson River. The study takes place between April and June when striped bass are heading upstream toward fresh water on their annual spawning migration. During this time, there should be more striped bass in the Hudson River than during any other time of the year, providing fisheries biologists with the most accurate judgements of striped bass abundance.

But, after anglers up and down the coast hoped for good news from the Hudson River YOY survey. Unfortunately, the recorded more low numbers. Based on the chart shown below, this is the lowest number of striped bass recorded per haul since 1985, when annual YOY surveys were first implemented for 

This year, the haul numbers of Hudson River stripers were considerably lower than the year prior, leaving anglers hopeful that a cold winter with lots of precipitation and snowmelt will provide ideal spring spawning conditions.

The is aiming to rebuild the coastal stock of striped bass by 2029, but to do so, further adjustments to striped bass fishing regulations are in order. of Amendment 7—which aims to address overfishing while providing solutions to rebuild—offers several potential courses of action to help achieve the rebuilding goal by 2029. Some of those courses of action consider reallocation of commercial striped bass quotas, adjustments to the existing recreational slot limit (28-31 inches) and implementing recreational seasons, among other management measures that will help to reduce release mortality.

Anglers looking to help Hudson River stripers on an individual level can:

  • practice catch and release
  • keep fish wet: avoid dragging striped bass over sand or dry land. If possible, keep the fish in the water while handling during hook removal.
  • minimize time out of the water: when handling striped bass prior to revival and release, hold your breath and aim to get the fish back in the water in one breath.
  • keep a log: if keeping a personal fishing log is not your thing, where you can easily record data from your trips. They will even if preferred to e-logs.
  • New York anglers who fish for striped bass south of the George Washington Bridge are eligible to volunteer to this program, which provides valuable feedback to NYSDEC throughout the course of the season.
  • speak up for striped bass: anglers can submit comments to the ASMFC during public comment periods about how they’d like to see the striped bass fishery managed.
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Delaware numbers are off as well.  They were below the 25th percentile of the entire time series for the third year in a row, meeting the definition for recruitment failure.

 

We now have recruitment failure in three of the four major spawning areas--Virginia, Maryland, and the Delaware River.

 

The Hudson spawn, such as it is, is actually the most successful of the bunch.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

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14 hours ago, lostinthewash said:

Had to remove some link text embedded in the article but you'll get the gist.

 

 

Each year since 1985, the has recorded a Young of Year (YOY) Striped Bass Abundance survey using equipment including a 500-foot haul seine net and electrofishing practices in the Hudson River. The study takes place between April and June when striped bass are heading upstream toward fresh water on their annual spawning migration. During this time, there should be more striped bass in the Hudson River than during any other time of the year, providing fisheries biologists with the most accurate judgements of striped bass abundance.

But, after anglers up and down the coast hoped for good news from the Hudson River YOY survey. Unfortunately, the recorded more low numbers. Based on the chart shown below, this is the lowest number of striped bass recorded per haul since 1985, when annual YOY surveys were first implemented for 

This year, the haul numbers of Hudson River stripers were considerably lower than the year prior, leaving anglers hopeful that a cold winter with lots of precipitation and snowmelt will provide ideal spring spawning conditions.

The is aiming to rebuild the coastal stock of striped bass by 2029, but to do so, further adjustments to striped bass fishing regulations are in order. of Amendment 7—which aims to address overfishing while providing solutions to rebuild—offers several potential courses of action to help achieve the rebuilding goal by 2029. Some of those courses of action consider reallocation of commercial striped bass quotas, adjustments to the existing recreational slot limit (28-31 inches) and implementing recreational seasons, among other management measures that will help to reduce release mortality.

Anglers looking to help Hudson River stripers on an individual level can:

  • practice catch and release
  • keep fish wet: avoid dragging striped bass over sand or dry land. If possible, keep the fish in the water while handling during hook removal.
  • minimize time out of the water: when handling striped bass prior to revival and release, hold your breath and aim to get the fish back in the water in one breath.
  • keep a log: if keeping a personal fishing log is not your thing, where you can easily record data from your trips. They will even if preferred to e-logs.
  • New York anglers who fish for striped bass south of the George Washington Bridge are eligible to volunteer to this program, which provides valuable feedback to NYSDEC throughout the course of the season.
  • speak up for striped bass: anglers can submit comments to the ASMFC during public comment periods about how they’d like to see the striped bass fishery managed.

Fish to catch a fish to eat and stop treating them as toy to hook fight for fun for your personal pleasure and then release. 

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9 hours ago, Potato Caboose said:

Fish to catch a fish to eat and stop treating them as toy to hook fight for fun for your personal pleasure and then release. 

What about the fish that are below or above the slot? Can't help catching those. And if everyone kept a slot that would decrease the stocks even more. I know most of the time I release slots I tend to keep less than four fish per year.

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I’m not surprised the numbers are lower, the amount of breeders I witness getting poached every spring is insane. I’ve been fishing the lower Hudson on many of the piers and every spring people with no regard for the population of the stripers just taking big breeders every spring. I’ve called game warden but they can only do so much. Seems like a losing battle 

Boston Strong
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/20/2024 at 6:59 AM, lostinthewash said:

What about the fish that are below or above the slot? Can't help catching those. And if everyone kept a slot that would decrease the stocks even more. I know most of the time I release slots I tend to keep less than four fish per year.

That’s about what I keep a year. I know realistically people will fish catch and release. Not that it will happen but shutting down the Raritan, Chesapeake May and June would probably help. 
 

Possession of a snagging hook should be illegal period.

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1 hour ago, Potato Caboose said:

Not that it will happen but shutting down the Raritan, Chesapeake May and June would probably help. 
 

Possession of a snagging hook should be illegal period.

I'd be on board with c&r in the rivers and bays through June. Of course everyone would be on the honor system...and we know alot are not honest. I'm also on board with possession of a snagging hook being illegal. The are legal setups with circle hooks that ca be used instead. 

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This captain John McMurray is a clueless clown. He does make some points but ln  the end all he’s thinking about is his a-s. That’s the problem everyone just thinking of their piece of the pie. Just because a few places have fish and a few guys know how to catch them people forget how many stripers we had around 10-15and 20years back. You can be on them for months. In the end McMurry is just another clown. 

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Well Hydraman, I have known John McMurray for like 30 years now, so to call him a clueless clown is way off base. Those who fish for a living certainly have a lot more at stake when it comes to fishing closures. John has always been a standup guy when it comes to fisheries management.  I mean back in the day, the Coney Island bass poachers sunk his boat while it was moored at the dock, when he made it known what was going on..

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19 hours ago, 27conch said:

Well Hydraman, I have known John McMurray for like 30 years now, so to call him a clueless clown is way off base. Those who fish for a living certainly have a lot more at stake when it comes to fishing closures. John has always been a standup guy when it comes to fisheries management.  I mean back in the day, the Coney Island bass poachers sunk his boat while it was moored at the dock, when he made it known what was going on..

That’s my opinion on the article and he wrote it so I stand by what I said. He turned in some poachers as he should have. But to protect a resource that belongs to all of us is to much for him it seems. That’s what I got from that article. The bass are just fine is not really an opinion that has any merit these days. 

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