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Anyone use foam board in a shower?

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gobigblue

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Im re doing my main bathroom.  Going to pull the tub and do a walkin shower despite my 8 & 12 yr old telling me ill never be able to sell the house without a bathtub.  Ill let the next guy worry about that.

 

Years ago i did a shower with kerdi membrane, it kinda sucked and i needed to use cement board behind it anyway so there was no time or cost or heavy lifting saved using that.  Did another shower with cement board and hydro ban.  I much preferred painting on the waterproofing and tiling right over it.

 

Now it seems everyone is using foam boards.  Seems like it would make the job a lot easier carrying the boards up the stairs and cutting them to fit.  There is a weird curve at the ceiling and i plan to tile all the way up in the shower.  The foam boards are really expensive compared to cement boards, but since im diy i dont mind paying it.  Not sure how much more ill need to get their screws and washers and tape and caulk or if thats all regular off the shelf stuff.

 

Would love to hear if anyone has used the foam boards and how it went.  Also unsure of what im doing for the pan, kinda thinking i might want to just get a standard tub sized porcelain pan that i dont need to worry about tiling over or waterproofing.

 

Major monkey wrench in this project is its the only shower in the house.  I can shower at the gym so its not a big deal for me, but i do have 2 boys.  No wife so i have a really happy life, but id like to time the shower re do on the week i dont have them.  So id need to demo and have the whole thing done within a week...

 

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It has been a few years since we did one, but I would look at videos from Schluter Kerdi. That was the system that most went to and was great in our applications. Their shower base was awesome and avoided the old copper pan, mud job, and even one inspection! 

 

Not sure about this curved ceiling, but straight is always easier..... if you can either straighten it out or stop a few inches short of the ceiling. Laser level is a must, or at least a very good tool to have during layout. I do the build out and call in my tile guy. Money well spent, IMO.

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1 hour ago, nightfighter said:

It has been a few years since we did one, but I would look at videos from Schluter Kerdi. That was the system that most went to and was great in our applications. Their shower base was awesome and avoided the old copper pan, mud job, and even one inspection! 

 

Not sure about this curved ceiling, but straight is always easier..... if you can either straighten it out or stop a few inches short of the ceiling. Laser level is a must, or at least a very good tool to have during layout. I do the build out and call in my tile guy. Money well spent, IMO.

No chance at making the top straight as the back shower wall is the house exterior and where the roof line slopes down lol

 

Probably going to go with kerdi or wedi as they seem the most easily available as a diy job. I might be going with an acrylic/porcelain base with a built in bench as it will save me a ton of time not having to worry about waterproofing the floor and tiling.  

20231201_093404.jpg

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Thats the same kinda tile i was going to use.  White subway with a dark grout.  Dark slate for the floor around the sink and toilet. 

 

Thinking about getting a base like the attached image as it will save time i think and be a simple install. 

 

Im making calls now to get estimates for the tiling as i dont want this to turn into a weeks long project.  The more i think about it the more im leaning to just paying someone to put up the boards and tile and everything and be done with it all in a few days.

Screenshot_20231130_102908_Wayfair.jpg

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 Theoretically you can put the Kerdi right over drywall, but I guess you better not screw it up. From the Schluter website:

Quote

Can I install Schluter®-KERDI over drywall in my tiled shower?
Yes. Once you install KERDI over the drywall panels, they will be completely protected from the water and vapor in your tiled shower.

It's worth buying the John Bridge Kerdi Shower Book if you're going with Kerdi, Ebook download with great instructions and pictures from an expert. Best $10 you can spend if you're going that route.

 

If I were doing this job, I'd figure out a way to install a temporary shower somewhere in the house like the basement, or wait till summer and do it outside. Don't like flying without a net! When we expanded our apartment to the unit upstairs, I left the kitchen upstairs intact so we could use it while I renovated our downstairs kitchen, then after that was done, finally made that upstairs kitchen into our own bedroom. It was inconvenient, but not as inconvenient as not having a kitchen, like most kitchen renos go!

 

Edited by gellfex
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Your kids may be right. Most people want and need a tub at some point, young or old, soaking this or that. The next guy might make an offer on another house with a much needed tub if he has kids. You're losing something most people want, what are you gaining by having a shower only?

 

If you do go w/ the shower, the Schluter systems are nice, but expensive.

(*member previously known as 'petergulickjr')

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I like the black Schluter GG...

 

I've been using Go Board for years now. Amazing product. Space the boards with 1/8" tile spacers, use the sealant on all joints, cover all the screws, and tile away. So easy to score and snap, and cutting it with a drywall saw for the shower valve etc is so easy. My plumber and I have been using copper pans for 15 years with no failures, so getting him to commit to using prefabricated pans has been tough. Currently doing a basement remodel with a new full bath that includes a 70" x 36" shower. Using a Laticrete prefabricated pan for this one. Such a nice product. I'll get pictures when the pan and board are installed and sealed. Go Board is great though. Lowes carries it here, but I have to go to a tile place to get the sealant.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Chunkah said:

I like the black Schluter GG...

 

I've been using Go Board for years now. Amazing product. Space the boards with 1/8" tile spacers, use the sealant on all joints, cover all the screws, and tile away. So easy to score and snap, and cutting it with a drywall saw for the shower valve etc is so easy. My plumber and I have been using copper pans for 15 years with no failures, so getting him to commit to using prefabricated pans has been tough. Currently doing a basement remodel with a new full bath that includes a 70" x 36" shower. Using a Laticrete prefabricated pan for this one. Such a nice product. I'll get pictures when the pan and board are installed and sealed. Go Board is great though. Lowes carries it here, but I have to go to a tile place to get the sealant.

 

 

My tile guy is a big fan of the schluter products. I don’t argue with him. I just let him do what he does best. 

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On 12/1/2023 at 3:49 PM, Sloatsburg Pete said:

Your kids may be right. Most people want and need a tub at some point, young or old, soaking this or that. The next guy might make an offer on another house with a much needed tub if he has kids. You're losing something most people want, what are you gaining by having a shower only?

 

If you do go w/ the shower, the Schluter systems are nice, but expensive.

The argument for having a tub so often involves the subject of selling the house down the road. I don't buy into that. One of the top causes of falling in the home occurs in the bathroom. Specifically, when stepping in or out, stepping OVER the tub...  Most of my clients are doing a bathroom remodel for them! Not for the next owner... And I don't know when the last time I even thought about wanting or taking a bath in the common 60" home bathtub.

 

As far as cost, if you are doing it yourself in your own home, the materials might seem more expensive. But not when you factor in a copper pan, or the time Kerdi base saves with one less inspection or the ease of foamboard walls, curb, and seats that take longer to build with multiple material types. And you will not have the dust from cutting Durock or other cement-based products. Time is money. I tell the client i would rather they invest more in their material products instead of labor.

Edited by nightfighter
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