Jump to content

Trophy Season no More? (Hopefully)

Rate this topic


Saltfruit

Recommended Posts

Maryland suggested at last October's Atlantic Striped Bass Management Board meeting that it would be imposing unilateral reductions whether or not the Board chose to take additional action.

 

One thing that I would note is that it seems that only one sector will be bearing the conservation burden.  Perhaps that's because Maryland is looking at the 14.5% commercial harvest quota included in Addendum II to address the commercial sector.  On the other hand, Maryland's commercials only landed about 80% of their striped bass quota in 2022, meaning that a 14.5% reduction in quota will still allow them to land 100% of what they landed in 2022, and take no real reduction at all.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I am hearing there are at least a handful of states that are looking at what they can do with or without board action to move things in the right direction.  Also, starting to ask hard questions towards their peers from .... less motivated states.

 

When things are on a downturn, people have a lot of time on their hands to ensure others have their house in order.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 mins ago, riverside_eng said:

From what I am hearing there are at least a handful of states that are looking at what they can do with or without board action to move things in the right direction.  Also, starting to ask hard questions towards their peers from .... less motivated states.

 

When things are on a downturn, people have a lot of time on their hands to ensure others have their house in order.

It would be nice if some of them could pressure the states like NJ, DE & MD.  

ASMFC - Destroying public resources and fisheries one stock at a time since 1942.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 mins ago, Fergal said:

It would be nice if some of them could pressure the states like NJ, DE & MD.  


I mean, maybe they have, and this is why MD is actually proposing action.

Maybe it's the new Gov, maybe it's the commentary in previous public hearings.

 

There will be another public hearing for these proposals I believe - and that's where the spirited Chesapeake guys will need to show out.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Saltfruit said:


I mean, maybe they have, and this is why MD is actually proposing action.

Maybe it's the new Gov, maybe it's the commentary in previous public hearings.

 

There will be another public hearing for these proposals I believe - and that's where the spirited Chesapeake guys will need to show out.

 

 

 

I don’t trust MD one bit.
 

Plus, any proposal is hollow given that commercially they’ll fish 2024 under 2023 regs and they’re not going to take any cut to their commercial landings, they’re looking at 14% off quota. In 2022 they used about 80% of their quota. So if quota is cut by 14% they can actually land more fish than 2022. 

ASMFC - Destroying public resources and fisheries one stock at a time since 1942.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 mins ago, Fergal said:

I don’t trust MD one bit.
 

Plus, any proposal is hollow given that commercially they’ll fish 2024 under 2023 regs and they’re not going to take any cut to their commercial landings, they’re looking at 14% off quota. In 2022 they used about 80% of their quota. So if quota is cut by 14% they can actually land more fish than 2022. 


I feel like reducing the recreational season(s) is a win regardless, but maybe I'm jaded by the bar being so low already....

 

If I'm not mistaken the Virginia commercial sector is more harmful.

Not to mention the Omega destruction they allow in their waters which should count as commercially-based striped bass indictment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, riverside_eng said:

From what I am hearing there are at least a handful of states that are looking at what they can do with or without board action to move things in the right direction.  Also, starting to ask hard questions towards their peers from .... less motivated states.

 

When things are on a downturn, people have a lot of time on their hands to ensure others have their house in order.

The general rule is that the New England states tend to promote conservation, along with Pennsylvania and, more recently, North Carolina.  New York used to affiliate itself with New England, but given the state's new legislative appointee to the ASMFC, will probably be conservation-hostile going forward.

 

New Jersey, Delaware, and traditionally Maryland are usually obstacles to conservation efforts, although Maryland has been showing a few hopeful signs recently.

 

Virginia could go either way, although Gov. Youngkin is a liability.  DC and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission can also be wild cards, with both often followiung Maryland's lead.

 

As far as conservation-oriented states taking independent action and influencing other states, it worked the other way the last time the stock crashed.  No state wanted to adopt more restrictive measures which hindered their fishermen, when the bass could still be caught as soon as they swam into a neighboring state's waters.  It was a race to the bottom until the Atlantic Striped Bass Conservatiopn Act gave the ASMFC authority to impose a single set of regulations on everyone, and removed the competitive incentive to do nothing.

 

We'll see what happens this time around.

"I have always believed that outdoor writers who come out against fish and wildlife conservation are in the wrong business. To me, it makes as much sense golf writers coming out against grass.."  --  Ted Williams

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, CWitek said:

The general rule is that the New England states tend to promote conservation, along with Pennsylvania and, more recently, North Carolina.  New York used to affiliate itself with New England, but given the state's new legislative appointee to the ASMFC, will probably be conservation-hostile going forward.

 

New Jersey, Delaware, and traditionally Maryland are usually obstacles to conservation efforts, although Maryland has been showing a few hopeful signs recently.

 

Virginia could go either way, although Gov. Youngkin is a liability.  DC and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission can also be wild cards, with both often followiung Maryland's lead.

 

As far as conservation-oriented states taking independent action and influencing other states, it worked the other way the last time the stock crashed.  No state wanted to adopt more restrictive measures which hindered their fishermen, when the bass could still be caught as soon as they swam into a neighboring state's waters.  It was a race to the bottom until the Atlantic Striped Bass Conservatiopn Act gave the ASMFC authority to impose a single set of regulations on everyone, and removed the competitive incentive to do nothing.

 

We'll see what happens this time around.

 

I appreciate your thoughts and insight.

 

You are an inspiration to continually be learning more and trying to contribute to common sense conservation action.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...