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Two Hand Spey Casting

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6 mins ago, TopStriperAngler said:

That's a cool device what happens when you take it off in terms of the wrist. I was reading on grips last season and got into useing the pointer finger on top grip for working on too much wrist break on the back cast. 

For me

No strain on the wrist at all. 
Thumb is always on top. 

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23 hours ago, surfflyguy said:

If you are looking for distance I think you should check out some of the Spey O Rama stuff they esstenitally cast in a big pond and all cast over 150 feet easily a calm ocean would essetially be the same thing. 

150ft is really quite easy with that equipment if there is no headwind. The heads are usually 70ft+ and they are not designed to turn over flies really. With small flies they would work thou. I would love to fish long bellies for atlantic salmon, but unfortunately the locations for that are too far or too expensive for me. The best season (spring flood) to catch them for me is when 700gr deep water express is the slowest sinking line I use.

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9 hours ago, sms said:

150ft is really quite easy with that equipment if there is no headwind. The heads are usually 70ft+ and they are not designed to turn over flies really. With small flies they would work thou. I would love to fish long bellies for atlantic salmon, but unfortunately the locations for that are too far or too expensive for me. The best season (spring flood) to catch them for me is when 700gr deep water express is the slowest sinking line I use.

I’m using a 13 ft 8 wt 625 gr line with a 46 ft head short belly Spey line. 
 

In your post, 70 ft+ head I would think they would be using a longer rod maybe 15 ft. Lot of rod to swing in my opinion. 
150 ft cast is not easily obtainable on a single spey back cast. 
Tom

 

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Hi Tom,

 

625gr and 46ft I would say that is more like a 9/10 spey line. But since it is still that short, so maybe short spey skagit -> spagit?

 

15'1" rod length. Nothing compared to 18 footer. With good technique it is possible to cast back to back full out distance casts for hours without fatigue. Compared to fishing, the casting frequency is much higher as there is no swing to wait, just quick stripping of the line back. For example single spey practise it is: single spey, strip, snake roll (to get the line back to starting position) and repeat. Cycle is normally a bit under 30sec. When I train, my left arm fails first due to stripping the line so much. With 15'1" comp stuff without difficult wind for a good caster 150ft is a piece of cake with a single spey.

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I was just going to edit my post, saying about average caster, but you beat me to it. Lol


Yes, but you have to remember who you are. You are above an average caster. Elite. An average caster is not going to swing a 15 foot rod or longer for hours.

 

I tried a 15 foot spey rod not for me. I returned it. 
I’ll stay with my 13 foot spey rod. I will get there. It’s a matter of good technique. 
Tom

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4 hours ago, reel em in said:

An average caster is not going to swing a 15 foot rod or longer for hours.

If one invests a bit in the technique (with someone who knows how to correct errors), it is very light to cast a 15 footer with a proper line.

It is more or less all about the anchor. Heavy anchor and way too much effort is needed and then it can be tiresome.

Light anchor and casting even a long belly spey line with a 15 footer is light - totally doable to hold the rod with just the thumb, index and middle finger without using the palm at all.

Also when distances required start to grow beyond certain point, then longer rod starts to be more efficient and lighter, but then we are talking quite far already.

So, knowing how to cast well and far one can make one's fishing much less tiring.

 

We've competed with my friends with 15ft and 18ft rods casting single handed. 18 footer is too much for me in that regard, just don't have the strength. But a light 15 footer is totally doable.

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8 hours ago, reel em in said:

 


Yes, but you have to remember who you are. You are above an average caster. Elite. An average caster is not going to swing a 15 foot rod or longer for hours.

 

 

 

3 hours ago, sms said:

If one invests a bit in the technique (with someone who knows how to correct errors), it is very light to cast a 15 footer with a proper line.

It is more or less all about the anchor. Heavy anchor and way too much effort is needed and then it can be tiresome.

Light anchor and casting even a long belly spey line with a 15 footer is light - totally doable to hold the rod with just the thumb, index and middle finger without using the palm at all.

Also when distances required start to grow beyond certain point, then longer rod starts to be more efficient and lighter, but then we are talking quite far already.

So, knowing how to cast well and far one can make one's fishing much less tiring.

 

We've competed with my friends with 15ft and 18ft rods casting single handed. 18 footer is too much for me in that regard, just don't have the strength. But a light 15 footer is totally doable.

In theory, you are correct.

But you’re still not going to get an average caster to swing a 15 foot rod. They complain about a 9 ft 8 wt rod. 

No instructors for me I’ve come this far without one.
Sure it might cut the learning curve but too much BS for me. 
Remember who you are, you’re not the average guy. 

I appreciate the wealth of information you are posting. 
Tom. 
 

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In the Nordics the standard for salmon rod was 15ft #10. I think now it is more or less 14ft #9 also. Below those are light and above those are the big rods. In the spring flood most people are using big rods. So the average guy here uses fairly heavy rods when needed.

 

Casting two handed is very light work in comparison to single handers of a bit higher weights.

 

Holding the rod during the swing is whole different thing then. I hate tip heavy in that. A few hours of swinging one and my neck/shoulder start to feel it.

I hate those tip heavy ones so much that since I wanted to get long fiberglass butt sections for this season and knew they would be tip heavy I put steel bar inside the rear. My rods ended up to just under 2lb. Was funny when the butt section alone felt like a whole set when picking it up. Worked fine, but didn't give similar benefit as with single handers in tuna fishing so I'll probably go back to normal carbon fiber rods next time.

 

Anyway, if you want to improve your casting, focus on the anchor. You do want it straight - it is incredible how little it is needed when it is straight. Piled up and no hold, just slippage. When you get your anchor right you need much less effort.

 

Yeah, I know I am not average guy when it comes to tossing a fly line. I am also self taught. But it took a lot of analysis, practice and understanding (and being part of developing of that on the Sexyloops board) of casting. Also in the later stages a buddy of mine became excellent and he had eye to spot what to improve on my casting.

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@sms

A SOL member reminded me that I have a 14 ft Spey rod rated 625gr I have been using it for overhead casting. I’ll get back out there when the wind calms down in the back bay. I need a nice south wind.

I’m going to get the proper anchor and the line tight and I’m going to hit my mark. 

That rod is a great rod.

Tom

 

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