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Waterproof Backpacks

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TheFriendlyFisherman

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Hi Everyone, I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions for a good waterproof backpack to be used for fishing. Looking for something that can hold maybe 2-3 3600/3700 boxes plus the supplemental fishing gear, preferably with some attachment points and/or easy access spots for some tools. For the days when not in the surf when I want to carry a little more gear - on beaches, jetty’s, estuaries, rivers, etc.  I want something waterproof for the foul weather days and in case I want to venture in the water, but that I can also just regularly carry. Any of you use anything like this? Let me know and thanks! 

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Do you need it to be submersible or just generally waterproof for rainy weather and splashes etc?

 

I use a backpack made of waterproof fabric for purposes similar to what you describe.  The seams aren’t sealed though.  
 

I’ve also got a Simms waterproof sling pack that is fully submersible with the appropriate zippers etc.  it’s too small to fit all the equipment you described. It’ll fit a couple of those Plano boxes, but 3 is pushing too far to be useful and wouldn’t leave room for other gear.
 

If you need this level of submersion protection, look for dry bags.  

Edited by FalmouthFisher
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I find carrying a back pack rather cumbersome … some folks seem to be worried about the weight of a fishing pole/ reel … bu bu bu yet some will carry a back pack , waders ,fishing pole and reel . Not sure about what’s heavy ,lite or just unnecessary… do you bring a surf bag when your walking on the beech with a back pack? I have seen anglers walking on the beech with a back pack just don’t remember if they had a surf bag 

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Yeti makes an excellent one, as does Patagonia. Both are pricey but fully submersible. Ortlieb makes something a bit less expensive, but it isn't submersible, only waterproof from rain and splash. Would stay far away from Simms bags, I've had nothing but bad experiences with them and their service department. 

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10 hours ago, FalmouthFisher said:

Do you need it to be submersible or just generally waterproof for rainy weather and splashes etc?

 

I use a backpack made of waterproof fabric for purposes similar to what you describe.  The seams aren’t sealed though.  
 

I’ve also got a Simms waterproof sling pack that is fully submersible with the appropriate zippers etc.  it’s too small to fit all the equipment you described. It’ll fit a couple of those Plano boxes, but 3 is pushing too far to be useful and wouldn’t leave room for other gear.
 

If you need this level of submersion protection, look for dry bags.  

I don’t necessarily need fully submersible but something that can take a good rain and some splash

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1 hour ago, TheFriendlyFisherman said:

I don’t necessarily need fully submersible but something that can take a good rain and some splash

I might steer clear of legit dry bags then.  They’re going to be more costly.  Probably more fragile.  And probably will be limited in features, options, and configurations.  And accessing things stored in them likely involves unrolling a roll top or dealing with waterproof zippers, which are usually a 2-handed operation.  
 

oh yeah, and dry bags also work in reverse.  Any moisture that finds its way in (wet plugs, wet line, etc) can’t get out.  You’ll often find that bags made of waterproof fabric, but not designed to be submersible will include drainage provisions to let water escape.  That might not be desirable if you’re planning on seam sealing and setting your bag down in standing water or wading such that the bag is partially submerged, though.  Just some food for thought. 

Edited by FalmouthFisher
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It might be a little bigger than what you are looking for, but I tend to use a MUUL Ruckbucket now most of the time. Doubles as a seat and a low performance cooler (if you add ice or freeze packs, but then you would not have room for any tackle boxes). I strap on a couple various molle compatible bags to the sides for frequent use items (sunscreen, bugspray, spare knife, flashlight/batteries, leader spool, hockey tape and first aid kit).

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On 9/29/2023 at 3:52 PM, FallenKell said:

It might be a little bigger than what you are looking for, but I tend to use a MUUL Ruckbucket now most of the time. Doubles as a seat and a low performance cooler (if you add ice or freeze packs, but then you would not have room for any tackle boxes). I strap on a couple various molle compatible bags to the sides for frequent use items (sunscreen, bugspray, spare knife, flashlight/batteries, leader spool, hockey tape and first aid kit).

Had never heard of those. Pretty sweet when I checked it out. 

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On 9/25/2023 at 11:26 AM, FalmouthFisher said:

I might steer clear of legit dry bags then.  They’re going to be more costly.  Probably more fragile.  And probably will be limited in features, options, and configurations.  And accessing things stored in them likely involves unrolling a roll top or dealing with waterproof zippers, which are usually a 2-handed operation.  
 

oh yeah, and dry bags also work in reverse.  Any moisture that finds its way in (wet plugs, wet line, etc) can’t get out.  You’ll often find that bags made of waterproof fabric, but not designed to be submersible will include drainage provisions to let water escape.  That might not be desirable if you’re planning on seam sealing and setting your bag down in standing water or wading such that the bag is partially submerged, though.  Just some food for thought. 

I'd second the advice here. Truly waterproof is two-handed op, even using a sling-pack. Fly fishermen use them a lot, so L.L. Bean, Orvis, Fishpond, and others make good waterproof bags. And indeed, waterproof means that if you put something stinky or damp inside, the bag really stays stinky because washing and drying it out is hard.

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I need a new gear bag myself.  I have a surf plug bag but the main bag is a fresh-water soft-sided bag with a shoulder strap.  Having a backpack type would be ideal if it's easily accessible in and out.  The weight alone is a pain to lug around, let alone on the death march in full suit.  Don't need it to be fully waterproof per say.  I lug it around and let it serve as a home base more or less and rest up on the beach, but have to keep an eye on it too, so that's kind of a pain as well...

(*member formerly known as 'jbg123')

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