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Newfoundland (NL) Trip: Incredible complicated fisheries regulations

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sauerkraut

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I am a guest for the end of August; and I have to behave as one to my (bird-watcher, non-fishing) hosts and friends.  But I am coming up with a 6Wt and would like to use it.

What's the problem?

A.  How to buy a non resident trout license AND salmon license before I step off the plane?  Yes: two separate licenses.

B.  Different regulations for-- North of 52 degrees north latitude vs. South of same.

C.  Fishing requirements different for angling less than, or further from... "800 meters from an approved provincial highway".

D.  Scheduled vs. Non Scheduled rivers (Schedule I)-- different requirements.

E.  Mandatory licensed guide requirements for some water bodies (most water bodies)... vs. some "trout" waters not requiring a NR to have a licensed guide present.

F.   Oh wait a minute:  NL is suffering some low water draught conditions like many other areas around the world; so, you have a list of dozens of different phone number choices covering the entire island of Newfoundland which you need to call to find out about any special territory or water closures.

 

***Trust me; I have been attempting phone calls to NL; to outfitters; to tourist bureaus around Trinity, NL; etc.  And I will continue to do so; but I have discovered nobody yet that is knowledgeable, useful, or helpful.               Maybe I should leave the 6 Wt. home and just bring a pair of bird watcher binoculars.

Edited by sauerkraut
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12 hours ago, sauerkraut said:

.       
       Maybe I should leave the 6 Wt. home and just bring a pair of bird watcher binoculars.

The way you cast that would be a good idea.  
If you need help figuring out which end to look through , I can help.

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18 hours ago, sauerkraut said:

I am a guest for the end of August; and I have to behave as one to my (bird-watcher, non-fishing) hosts and friends.  But I am coming up with a 6Wt and would like to use it.

What's the problem?

A.  How to buy a non resident trout license AND salmon license before I step off the plane?  Yes: two separate licenses.

B.  Different regulations for-- North of 52 degrees north latitude vs. South of same.

C.  Fishing requirements different for angling less than, or further from... "800 meters from an approved provincial highway".

D.  Scheduled vs. Non Scheduled rivers (Schedule I)-- different requirements.

E.  Mandatory licensed guide requirements for some water bodies (most water bodies)... vs. some "trout" waters not requiring a NR to have a licensed guide present.

F.   Oh wait a minute:  NL is suffering some low water draught conditions like many other areas around the world; so, you have a list of dozens of different phone number choices covering the entire island of Newfoundland which you need to call to find out about any special territory or water closures.

 

***Trust me; I have been attempting phone calls to NL; to outfitters; to tourist bureaus around Trinity, NL; etc.  And I will continue to do so; but I have discovered nobody yet that is knowledgeable, useful, or helpful.               Maybe I should leave the 6 Wt. home and just bring a pair of bird watcher binoculars.

You kinda in a tight spot time wise. I'd get a list of guides and make some calls August is good month salmon wise odds are good most will be booked. You never know though. Iuck is with you and can find an in, ask what is needed for you to bring or ask if tackle and flies can be provided. You'll be paying for that extra though if so. Trout wise I've no clue never trout fished there. 

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My early years fishing Caper Breton and the Gaspe was a challenge, but soon found out that there's lots of info and willing to share locals. When I made hotel/motel/and just rooms the advice was free and valuable. Surprisingly a free meal and a little libation does work.

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@sauerkraut Incredibly complicated? Really? I just took fifteen minutes to glance at the regulations and they seem pretty straightforward.  They reflect how the halieutic resources are managed, in this case by watershed and, in the case of Atlantic salmon, by river. So, you end up with different rules (daily limits, possession limits, etc.) depending on where you fish for a particular species. And the Scheduled rivers you refer to are basically salmon streams where, same as in Quebec and, I think, the other Maritime provinces, very special rules apply to this "endangered" species. So you only need to look up the body of water you want to fish to see what rules apply. Nothing out of the ordinary nor complicated.

 

And non residents of course pay more to fish. Thus the two licenses (no trout license for residents but they need a license to fish) and a mandatory guide in many situations. Again nothing exceptional.

 

Oh, about different rules north of 52° latitude, that covers the northern part of Labrador where you would have to book with an outfitter to fish. So not an issue for your trip.

 

 

Edited by Suave
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They sometimes call those folks "a little newfy", I'm told. Pour quoi?

 

Friend of mine flew in to Sand Hill River Lodge a week or so back. Water levels down, temps up. River(s) closed. Bailed on trip after three days and came back to the Cape.

 

Alaska on Sunday.

"Life's too short to fish with ugly flies."
Cynoscion Regalis
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  • 4 weeks later...

I went on this trip; it was an adventure and I would go back if somebody motivated me to do so.  I was hosted in the town of Trinity, dedicated to treating tourists well-- like tourists actually.  And they came in by the day tripper type busloads.

 

Both the properly licensed Non Resident fisherman visitor, AND the native, Resident NL person is sold two kill tags per year for Atlantic Salmon.  That's right:  Even the native NL residents are restricted to an Atlantic Salmon personal harvest of 2 fish PER YEAR.

 

But it is more complicated than that:  Your license comes with a RED kill/harvest tag, and a GREEN tag.  So, in addition to all the other river Schedule, List, Category, ETC. designations... the rivers on NL are additionally classified as NO-KILL, RED or Green for harvest purposes.  And you better not have a GREEN harvest tag affixed to a salmon on a RED river!

 

*But who would wanna kill an Atlantic salmon anyway?

**They were sometimes on the menu in the fanciest tourist restaurants in Trinity.

***Incidentally, the limit for hook/line codfish for the natives is 5 fish a day-- but allowed only 3 days a week--Friday through Sunday.

 

 

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