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Jighead75

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I know someone who went last week. Lots of undersized pollock, with just a few keeper pollock and redfish/cusk mixed in. Not great fishing by any stretch but it’s February and need to calibrate expectations accordingly. The old mates Tommy and Terry are still working there. Probably worth a trip for nostalgia’s sake if nothing else. 

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10 hours ago, 1ife said:

It's been a while but it use to be like this.

 

https://youtu.be/GVkHvZmKpU0

AHHH, 2012! "The Good Old Days"....

To think that since we have had Dan McKiernon as DMF Director for only two years how the haddock fishing has dropped off by (at least) 75%.

Does anyone NOT think that has anything to do with (one of the first things he did) him implementing "unlimited haddock" for the draggers? EVERYTHING BAD we see in our rec fisheries is "cause and effect" from bad fishery management policies that encourage "commercial excess". Then, that excess leads to almost permanent recreational cutbacks so in essence, we are paying the heaviest price for their ineptitude.

(Or outright corruption.  From our standpoint, there is no difference)

Edited by jason colby
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  • 11 months later...

It’s not what it was. It was usually awesome and yet sometimes sickening due to the slaughter. 
 

I would usually keep 15 or so then call it. Most of the fishing was very deep, 400-500 feet. After reeling through the porbeagles quickly that far I was usually toasted toast. 
 

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On 2/21/2023 at 7:25 AM, jason colby said:

AHHH, 2012! "The Good Old Days"....

To think that since we have had Dan McKiernon as DMF Director for only two years how the haddock fishing has dropped off by (at least) 75%.

Does anyone NOT think that has anything to do with (one of the first things he did) him implementing "unlimited haddock" for the draggers? EVERYTHING BAD we see in our rec fisheries is "cause and effect" from bad fishery management policies that encourage "commercial excess". Then, that excess leads to almost permanent recreational cutbacks so in essence, we are paying the heaviest price for their ineptitude.

(Or outright corruption.  From our standpoint, there is no difference)

Haddock filets sold today look trout size. WTF do you think will happen to the local stock. Thanks to Iceland you can still buy nice thick haddock at the store.

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9 hours ago, K Foley said:

…….. Thanks to Iceland you can still buy nice thick haddock at the store.


That’s true Kevi, but I’ve found the taste and texture of that haddock is inferior to the taste and texture of the haddock caught off MA back in the day.  
 

Blue Ribbon Fish on Millbury St in Worcester had great fish and chips when I was a kid. Some say it was the lard they used in their fryers, but I really think it was the fish its self. 
 

 

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55 mins ago, Joe G said:


That’s true Kevi, but I’ve found the taste and texture of that haddock is inferior to the taste and texture of the haddock caught off MA back in the day.  
 

Blue Ribbon Fish on Millbury St in Worcester had great fish and chips when I was a kid. Some say it was the lard they used in their fryers, but I really think it was the fish its self. 
 

 

 

Did they use haddock for fish and chips? Or pollock?

 

Pfantum Pfishah

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22 mins ago, bdowning said:

 

Did they use haddock for fish and chips? Or pollock?

 

 

Was told it was haddock by my family.  Maybe by the Blue Ribbon guys as well.  This would be circa 1945 - 1957. 

 

I recall the distinctive taste, the large flakes, the firm texture. and the thickness.  Huge pile of fish and chips in a large paper boat.  Brown, grease-stained paper.  The aroma was to die for.  Those were the days.   

 

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47 mins ago, Joe G said:

 

Was told it was haddock by my family.  Maybe by the Blue Ribbon guys as well.  This would be circa 1945 - 1957. 

 

I recall the distinctive taste, the large flakes, the firm texture. and the thickness.  Huge pile of fish and chips in a large paper boat.  Brown, grease-stained paper.  The aroma was to die for.  Those were the days.   

 

I have fond memories of Blue Ribbon myself.   During the old Catholic fish on Friday rule, Blue Ribbon would have a line out the door beginning around 4pm.   Everyone walking out the door and down Millbury St to waiting cars carrying greasy brown paper, double wrapped bundles of hot fish n chips.  

I heard the fish was either cod or haddock, depending on price and availability. But it was delicious.  I think the last time I was there was probably 1977.

The Sultan of Sluggo

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5 mins ago, bob_G said:

I have fond memories of Blue Ribbon myself.   During the old Catholic fish on Friday rule, Blue Ribbon would have a line out the door beginning around 4pm.   Everyone walking out the door and down Millbury St to waiting cars carrying greasy brown paper, double wrapped bundles of hot fish n chips.  

I heard the fish was either cod or haddock, depending on price and availability. But it was delicious.  I think the last time I was there was probably 1977.

We always hit Connies on West Boylston Street! 

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2 hours ago, Joe G said:


That’s true Kevi, but I’ve found the taste and texture of that haddock is inferior to the taste and texture of the haddock caught off MA back in the day.  
 

Blue Ribbon Fish on Millbury St in Worcester had great fish and chips when I was a kid. Some say it was the lard they used in their fryers, but I really think it was the fish its self. 
 

 

Hi Joe,

i'll go with the lard too not the fish. We had a fish marketb in East Weymouth that was like what Bob G said below. Line out the door evrry Friday for lent. Everybody ordering fish and chips. It used to drive my father crazy that they cooked each order seperate even though everyone was ordering multiples of the same thing. I'm talking late 50's and as I remember 50 cents per order. You had to show up to order no phone orders. I can see the grease coming through the brown paper bags and asking about 10 times on the way home "can I take another fry"?

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