lostinthewash

I'll stick to the beach

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I rather catch less fish on the beach than climb on jetties or set sail in a kayak both are too dangerous 

 

 

Body of Texas kayaker believed found days after he went missing, Coast Guard says

http://www.foxnews.com/us/body-texas-kayaker-believed-found-days-missing-coast-guard-says

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We all have our preferences. You just gotta know your limitations and be prepared

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There are many dangerous hobbies and actions that you probably do all the time, everyday plumbers, electricians, roofers, auto mechanics, and many others get hurt or even killed on  a daily basis. Its as safe as you make it, tragedies still occur, its not a frequent occurrence. 

 

You cannot live life in a shell, not saying you have to take up mountain climbing or flying like a human missile, but shying away from fun and adventure is no way to live. 

 

Properly trained and reasonable people are as safe as you can be in that situation, but kayaking and jetty fishing although dangerous, shouldn't be avoided because your scaredy fraid like a little girl. They are learned skills, and ones which will will keep you alive, spend more time trying to live then thinking about dying. 

 

Good grief, forget about going fishing and watch tv and read about it instead. Maybe you should go kayak hunting and jetty searching, buy a pair of korkers and go down at low tide during the day and get the feel. For fishing purposes off the front was usually the best spot to fish them, some are like platforms, most of the good ones are boulder fields. Bring a friend, chances are you'll both live. 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Highlander1 said:

There are many dangerous hobbies and actions that you probably do all the time, everyday plumbers, electricians, roofers, auto mechanics, and many others get hurt or even killed on  a daily basis. Its as safe as you make it, tragedies still occur, its not a frequent occurrence. 

 

You cannot live life in a shell, not saying you have to take up mountain climbing or flying like a human missile, but shying away from fun and adventure is no way to live. 

 

Properly trained and reasonable people are as safe as you can be in that situation, but kayaking and jetty fishing although dangerous, shouldn't be avoided because your scaredy fraid like a little girl. They are learned skills, and ones which will will keep you alive, spend more time trying to live then thinking about dying. 

 

Good grief, forget about going fishing and watch tv and read about it instead. Maybe you should go kayak hunting and jetty searching, buy a pair of korkers and go down at low tide during the day and get the feel. For fishing purposes off the front was usually the best spot to fish them, some are like platforms, most of the good ones are boulder fields. Bring a friend, chances are you'll both live. 

 

 

 

 

Insults noted you do you and I'll do me

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9 hours ago, lostinthewash said:

I rather catch less fish on the beach than climb on jetties or set sail in a kayak both are too dangerous 

 

 

Body of Texas kayaker believed found days after he went missing, Coast Guard says

http://www.foxnews.com/us/body-texas-kayaker-believed-found-days-missing-coast-guard-says

9 hours ago, lostinthewash said:

I rather catch less fish on the beach than climb on jetties or set sail in a kayak both are too dangerous 

 

 

Body of Texas kayaker believed found days after he went missing, Coast Guard says

http://www.foxnews.com/us/body-texas-kayaker-believed-found-days-missing-coast-guard-says

There's risk in almost everything we do on a daily basis.  Both kayaking and climbing on jetty's have their risks, if proper equipment is used and common sense employed the risk is minimized.  That being said, we all have our own levels of risk we are willing to accept. I've been scrambling on rock piles since I was a kid fishing for tog in Holgate on summer vacations in the mid 70's. Barefoot then...sliding on my butt to get down to the honey holes.  I'm in my late 50's now, and stay in reasonably good physical shape.  Always wear korkers and stay keenly aware of the water conditions..I feel as comfortable, if not more alive, being at the end of a rock pile as I do standing on the sand.  I can't imagine not fishing from jetties.  I'll keep at it as long as my body allows. 

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If you say “helmet” and “jetty” in the same sentence, they will make fun of you in the Tavern!

 

That said, safety equipment is never a bad thing. If you feel more comfortable & safe in a PFD (kayak or rock hopping), then you should wear one. 
 

Just stay off the kayak in cold water situations. I’m not avoiding kayaking forever but I am mostly staying away from it for now because my life prevents the time needed to do the proper prep & investing in a proper big water yak. I also fish alone due to schedule madness. (Another risk factor IMHO.)

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no adventures = no stories= no life lived.....more dangerous to drive to and from work than it is stand out on a rock 100 yards out in the ocean...throw some spikes on a good pfd and try it at least once good chance youll try it again..catch some solace like u wont get on a beach a sunrise or set like youve never experienced and if all goes well you get a few fish while your at it..i bet youll be glad u did it

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5 hours ago, lostinthewash said:

Insults noted you do you and I'll do me

I don't want to do either one of you. Neither are my type.

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I like the OPs philosophy "I'll do me and you do you." Can't argue with that. Also can't argue with the fact that no fish is worth your life.  However there's certain things a striper fisherman in NJ is expected to do. Otherwise you're not a striper fisherman but rather a guy that fishes for stripers. Probably 99% of guys fall into the latter category. 

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i googled the water temps and in that area of TX it’s mid to high 50s in Jan & early Feb. 
 

Nobody is lasting very long - especially without a wet or dry suit - especially without a PFD. 
 

I was reading just last week about cold water response. Even at 57 degrees, he would lose his abilities fairly quickly. Floating survival (with a PFD) could be an hour to several hours but not the functional time. That’s much shorter. I was looking at examples in the 40s but the same stuff applies on the 50s just takes a little longer. 

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1 min ago, adams54 said:

I like the OPs philosophy "I'll do me and you do you." Can't argue with that. Also can't argue with the fact that no fish is worth your life.  However there's certain things a striper fisherman in NJ is expected to do. Otherwise you're not a striper fisherman but rather a guy that fishes for stripers. Probably 99% of guys fall into the latter category. 

Not too many jetty spots and parking vanishing as we speak. So maybe we should just say “good call”
 

I will point out that a few times I’ve been at the business end of an inlet jetty - closer to the water than I probably should’ve been for a jetty tip but only because the conditions were so nice the ocean was calling me! You find yourself quite keyed in to the sounds of the approaching waves and it’s a sickening sound when one that’s way bigger than the rest bashes through unexpectedly. Spikes or not, that’ll pucker up the ole backside!

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