sauerkraut

OLD BOOKS -- REFERENCES?

Rate this topic

42 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, BrianBM said:

 

Parenthetically, I can't think of anyone who has written so well, on so many and so varied a range of topics, as John McPhee. Geology, aeronautics ("The Deltoid Pumpkin Seed"), the shipping industry ("Uncommon carriers") and so many other topics ... if I reincarnate as a writer, I'd like to take him as my role model.

If you really want to become a disciple of author John McPhee, look up and read his essay, THE PATCH.  He makes the mundane and unglamorous chain pickerel (in the setting of L. Winnipesaukee) come alive.

 

Separately, I am reading a book, THE LONGEST SILENCE, by Thos. McGuane.  This was gifted to me by family who accuse me that the book title corresponds with their perceptions of my priorities.  Actually, the other book was similarly gifted from my non fishing family--  truly judging a book by its cover (title) so to speak and applying it to me. 

 

 

IMG_3908.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I prefer my older books written by the older guys. Daignault, Woolner, Burnley, Lymon. I also have several from the early 1900's written by Van Kampen Heilner. I love reading about places that were fished well over a hundred years ago, the same places im fishing today.

 

Newer books by Skinner, The Greek, and Fly Fishing for striped bass by Rich Murphy is also valuable for current tactics

Edited by Fishit 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Fishit 2 said:

I prefer my older books written by the older guys. Daignault, Woolner, Burnley, Lymon. I also have several from the early 1900's written by Van Kampen Heilner. I love reading about places that were fished well over a hundred years ago, the same places im fishing today.

 

Newer books by Skinner, The Greek, and Fly Fishing for striped bass by Rich Murphy is also valuable for current tactics

It is worth reading Daignault for the prose alone. Incredible writing and storytelling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, BrianBM said:

AND speaking of writers past, does anyone remember Larry Koller?

Did he write Shots at Whitetails?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know. He wrote about freshwater angling, and I have a treasured book of his from childhood. I infer that he was active in the far north before WW II; he mentions, in the section on pike, that he'd seen a trio of fish speared by a Cree chieftain that were well above the 47 - lb. IGFA record. That wouldn't happen now.

 

I'm going to re-read it before I pass it on to a 13 y.o. angler I know. I was aware that he was a lot more literate than your normal hook-and-bullet scribe, and I wonder if I will still find that to be the case when I reread it as an adult. Rereading things that I loved as an adolescent can be unsettling, the golden glow that surrounds things from youth doesn't often survive rereading forty years later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2023 at 9:47 PM, sauerkraut said:

I was flipping through that FISHERMAN'S DIGEST, (First Annual edition),

Edited by Tom McNally:  And the first article was Spoonplugging, by Buck Perry.  Who ever heard of this technique in this era?  Maybe there is something here for a savvy LMB/SMB bass fisherman to learn or relearn.  Or maybe not--  Perry needed a search system in his day.  Now you can just cruise around with sonar, I guess.

Buck's the man. Preached structure fishing. "The home of the bass is deep water." His dad kicked his ass whenever he said that. I've got a bunch of spoonplugs, like they said; "looks like a shoehorn that a horse stepped on." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2023 at 8:43 PM, sauerkraut said:

  It's Winter.  I gather some, or many of us read because we can't fish much.  So, we read, and sometimes reread:  DZ, Skinner, Gribbs, Daignault, Mueller, Audet, etc.

 

 I was looking through some of my library of "contemporary" authors and books, and happened to notice that skinny brown book, STRIPED BASS - Rodman, (next to Dick Russell's Striper Wars in the pic).  Copyright 1944, and probably years before our more well known writers.  This got me digging deeper into my library--  and curious:

1.  What may be in your library?

2.  What may have you read-- or reread?

3  What may you have learned-- or relearned?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3901.JPG

I'll bet I have close to 1,000 books on fishing, many of them duplicates. What can I say? Got carried away, I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/23/2023 at 3:28 PM, XBMX said:

Reading The Water and all of Frank Daignault's stuff are worth the time, but The Shining Tides is my all time favorite. Love story-murder mystery-fishing told through the eyes of a 125lb Striper. Worth the trouble of finding a copy.

About half way through the shining tides right now really cool book, totally different than all the instructional books out there. Thanks to Dennis and Zeno for mentioning it in the recent podcast. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, BrianBM said:

I don't know. He wrote about freshwater angling, and I have a treasured book of his from childhood. I infer that he was active in the far north before WW II; he mentions, in the section on pike, that he'd seen a trio of fish speared by a Cree chieftain that were well above the 47 - lb. IGFA record. That wouldn't happen now.

 

I'm going to re-read it before I pass it on to a 13 y.o. angler I know. I was aware that he was a lot more literate than your normal hook-and-bullet scribe, and I wonder if I will still find that to be the case when I reread it as an adult. Rereading things that I loved as an adolescent can be unsettling, the golden glow that surrounds things from youth doesn't often survive rereading forty years later.

I checked, and he did, in fact, write Shots at Whitetails.  

 

I suspect that you will find his language still better than what you generally see today, if perhaps just a little stilted.  When I read a lot of the older writers, Jack O'Connor probably foremost among them, the quality of the writers stand out.

 

Given that I write a little, I hate to say it, but today's writers can't generally stand up to those of the past; they're generally too interested in pushing product to tell a good story.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.