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OLD BOOKS -- REFERENCES?

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As some one who is in their mid 20s has never read an actual book on fishing, this post is a gold mine. It will be very cool to get some of these books and see what the older generation can show me. Kinda getting sick of YouTube and the internet..  If I have to start with 2 or 3 books what do you recommend I seek being I am a Long Island fisherman?

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Any book by Doc Muller or Frank Daignault is worth reading, for the narrow and specific purposes for which they are written.

 

A particular shout-out for John McPhee's "The Founding Fish." It is not a how-to manual on the American shad, though it includes a good deal of advice, but it is so much more. Most of the books we've seen are manuals on how-to-catch-this-fish, and that's fine, but they aren't literature in any sense. For a broader view of angling and the world, John Cole's "Striper: a Story of Fish and Man," John Hersey's "Blues," "Men's Lives," "A Perfect Storm," "The Fisherman's Ocean," and "In the Heart of the Sea" are all highly recommended.

 

Parenthetically, I can't think of anyone who has written so well, on so many and so varied a range of topics, as John McPhee. Geology, aeronautics ("The Deltoid Pumpkin Seed"), the shipping industry ("Uncommon carriers") and so many other topics ... if I reincarnate as a writer, I'd like to take him as my role model.

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Reading The Water and all of Frank Daignault's stuff are worth the time, but The Shining Tides is my all time favorite. Love story-murder mystery-fishing told through the eyes of a 125lb Striper. Worth the trouble of finding a copy.

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24 mins ago, XBMX said:

Reading The Water and all of Frank Daignault's stuff are worth the time, but The Shining Tides is my all time favorite. Love story-murder mystery-fishing told through the eyes of a 125lb Striper. Worth the trouble of finding a copy.

Would love to buy Reading the Water but copies are currently very expensive! The Shining Tides sounds cool.

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Reading The Water was reprinted in paperback as I recall.

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Just now, XBMX said:

Reading The Water was reprinted in paperback as I recall.

Yeah but paperbacks are still north of $60. A lot are $90 plus. 

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2 mins ago, MainelySmallies said:

Yeah but paperbacks are still north of $60. A lot are $90 plus. 

Wow, wonder what TST's is selling for. Try a WTB in the for sale area.

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2 hours ago, BrianBM said:

A particular shout-out for John McPhee's "The Founding Fish." It is not a how-to manual on the American shad, though it includes a good deal of advice, but it is so much more. Most of the books we've seen are manuals on how-to-catch-this-fish, and that's fine, but they aren't literature in any sense. For a broader view of angling and the world, John Cole's "Striper: a Story of Fish and Man," John Hersey's "Blues," "Men's Lives," "A Perfect Storm," "The Fisherman's Ocean," and "In the Heart of the Sea" are all highly recommended.

 

Parenthetically, I can't think of anyone who has written so well, on so many and so varied a range of topics, as John McPhee. Geology, aeronautics ("The Deltoid Pumpkin Seed"), the shipping industry ("Uncommon carriers") and so many other topics ... if I reincarnate as a writer, I'd like to take him as my role model.

I hardily agree, McPhee is in a class of his own when writing on many subjects. I didn't know he had a fish one. I'll pick it up. As a tennis guy I can say that his "Levels of the Game" an entire book devoted to one tennis match is perhaps the best tennis book ever written, along with "Inner Tennis" of course.

At one time I really enjoyed the Trout Bum series of books, as lighter reading and really dug Ray Bergman's "Trout", which is very well written and has a ton of how to do it when it comes to trout fishing. It too might be the best of its' type ever done.

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1 hour ago, MainelySmallies said:

Yeah but paperbacks are still north of $60. A lot are $90 plus. 

Try contacting your public library and asking them to ask for the book via “inter library loan.” 

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16 mins ago, DZ said:

Try contacting your public library and asking them to ask for the book via “inter library loan.” 

Oh great idea! Thanks. I’ll do just that. Don’t know why that didn’t occur to me I use ILL a fair amount. 

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8 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Any book by Doc Muller or Frank Daignault is worth reading, for the narrow and specific purposes for which they are written.

 

A particular shout-out for John McPhee's "The Founding Fish." It is not a how-to manual on the American shad, though it includes a good deal of advice, but it is so much more. Most of the books we've seen are manuals on how-to-catch-this-fish, and that's fine, but they aren't literature in any sense. For a broader view of angling and the world, John Cole's "Striper: a Story of Fish and Man," John Hersey's "Blues," "Men's Lives," "A Perfect Storm," "The Fisherman's Ocean," and "In the Heart of the Sea" are all highly recommended.

 

Parenthetically, I can't think of anyone who has written so well, on so many and so varied a range of topics, as John McPhee. Geology, aeronautics ("The Deltoid Pumpkin Seed"), the shipping industry ("Uncommon carriers") and so many other topics ... if I reincarnate as a writer, I'd like to take him as my role model.

very interesting thanks, I'll check it out

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