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2023 Gardening

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Yup. I start them off in 1020 trays in 24 cell inserts on thermostat regulated mats and under LED growlight bars . Once they are booming  - about mid March or so - I swap them to 12 inserts/1020. Late April/ beginning of May into 6" diam (6.5"deep) plastic pots then out to the deck starting with just daytime then quickly going to full time with a clear cover at night to harden them - I created a take-apart greenhouse out of landscape ties I drilled holes in for thick wire square hoops (used for roadside plastic slipover signs (Think "Vote for Joe Blow") - these are the larger hoops - covered with 6mil poly weighted down with iron fence posts (Tbars). Poly only goes on at night or in a day frost because the plants need wind movement to twist them back and forth to develop woody fibers in the stem or they won't survive the summer outside - too fragile - even in a cage and I use good ones. Into the garden beds late May - first week of June. I strip off the lower 6" of branches and bury the root and the stripped section at a slight angle (anywhere a tomato stem touches earth it throws roots so they get a really good start on their root ball). After they are established I trim off the bottom 6" of branches to keep air circulating and lessen the blight issues. I also only water with a weeper hose. Regular doses of fertilizer etc via watering can - pinch off suckers - judicious pruning. Then we wait.

Puck - Ditch Troll #42 and Mouse #320, the Canadians  - Eh! At the Ditch for 50yrs

 

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Tomatoes:

10 Marsalato

11 Plum Regal (Sauce)

11 Shelby (Sauce) seed not here yet

9 Mountain Merit

9 Mountain Magic

9 Sun Sugar (yellow cherry type)

Abt 2/3 of the non-sauce will be given away to friends (What goes round comes round - most of them have helped me out from time to time plus I believe if you have been gifted a skill you should share it).

 

Have about 90 peppers in: 14 Paprika the rest ranging from Anaheim to Habanero (but a low heat Hab) they will get pickled or smoked, dehydrated and turned into powder for cooking.

 

144 cells (2 - 72 cell 1020 trays) of various onions 3 seeds to a cell. Go in as 1 cell clumps. 1 onion will come out over the summer for salad or cooking - the other 2 will be harvested - cured and stored.

 

Have to start the Brides flowers soon.

Regards

Puck

Edited by speedwell

Puck - Ditch Troll #42 and Mouse #320, the Canadians  - Eh! At the Ditch for 50yrs

 

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24 mins ago, speedwell said:

Yup. I start them off in 1020 trays in 24 cell inserts on thermostat regulated mats and under LED growlight bars . Once they are booming  - about mid March or so - I swap them to 12 inserts/1020. Late April/ beginning of May into 6" diam (6.5"deep) plastic pots then out to the deck starting with just daytime then quickly going to full time with a clear cover at night to harden them - I created a take-apart greenhouse out of landscape ties I drilled holes in for thick wire square hoops (used for roadside plastic slipover signs (Think "Vote for Joe Blow") - these are the larger hoops - covered with 6mil poly weighted down with iron fence posts (Tbars). Poly only goes on at night or in a day frost because the plants need wind movement to twist them back and forth to develop woody fibers in the stem or they won't survive the summer outside - too fragile - even in a cage and I use good ones. Into the garden beds late May - first week of June. I strip off the lower 6" of branches and bury the root and the stripped section at a slight angle (anywhere a tomato stem touches earth it throws roots so they get a really good start on their root ball). After they are established I trim off the bottom 6" of branches to keep air circula ofting and lessen the blight issues. I also only water with a weeper hose. Regular doses of fertilizer etc via watering can - pinch off suckers - judiciousss pruning. Then we wait.

Puck,

 

Really interesting.  Do you go through this elaborate process because your growing season is so short?

 

I have a 4x4 grow tent with both LED lighting and metal halide bulbs.    I start my seeds in trays similar to yours but with a water bath, also on a thermostat controller pad, under an LED light.  

Once they sprout I pull the pad, and the light, and switch over to my metal halide light. I also add a small oscillating fan since I feel the movement strengthens the root systems and stems.

Once they grow to about 2" I transfer them to solo cups until they reach about 5". Then I'll begin hardening them off outside for a week or so. By that time it's about 6/1 and ready for the garden.

 

The Sultan of Sluggo

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Ref my method of doing things. Not really all that complex. After 30 yrs in a Senior Engineers Procurement slot - purchasing Combat Systems - mostly Naval (think very complex specifications plus all the legal verbiage) - I have a tendency to explain in painful detail so anything I describe probably seems complicated (sorry just who I have become - my friends have to be very patient with me).

Tomatoes are greedy feeders so I have found that the bigger the root ball the faster  things get going.

We are nearly 5 degrees North of you and well inland south of the Ottawa River. We get a lot of "Lake Effect" weather from the Great Lakes and some nasty cold blows from the Rockies so early/mid May often means covering stuff and so does late Sept. Also do not get the Ocean effect.

Tomatoes and Peppers here traditionally go in last weekend of May along with my climbing beans and other warm weather stuff. Peas, carrots, kale, beets, kohlrabi, onions and other less tender stuff goes in beginning early May and all but 2 or 3 inches (weed control) of the straw gets pulled off the garlic.

I use shelving 16" by 24" 4 shelves high in South facing tall windows with heat mats and LED grow light bars. The 1020 trays are solid and the inserts have slits in the bottom. Water goes in the tray abt 3/8 inches abt every 4 days. All of this has evolved over the 39 yrs we have lived here. The raised beds I put in during the Covid lockdown were really the big game changer.

Anyway - Regards

Puck

Puck - Ditch Troll #42 and Mouse #320, the Canadians  - Eh! At the Ditch for 50yrs

 

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Question for you all. Did a search. It did not come up. 
 

I’m building a fourth raised bed. 
 

The other three were from rough cut hemlock. 2 X 10”. 20” high. 
 

Don’t have that supplier anymore. 
 

Is modern day pressure treated lumber safe for raised bed gardens?

 

I know the old stuff had CCA. Much of what I read on line says the modern stuff is OK. 

*

 

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Maine Guide

All 14 of our raised beds are 2"X10" brown pressure treated and so far I have not grown a third eye. (Seriously though - extensive research indicates it is safe to use). We have 10 at 4' by 10' and 4 at 12' by 4'. Sizing them wider than 4' makes them harder to weed. Ours are 2' apart so I can sit on the edge of one and easily reach across to the middle of the other then just move around to the other side.

 

Regards

Puck

 

PS found a reasonably priced Z 4000 (Generation 1 same as my 6500) spooling it with 30lb for beach work.

Puck - Ditch Troll #42 and Mouse #320, the Canadians  - Eh! At the Ditch for 50yrs

 

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On 2/15/2023 at 8:39 AM, bob_G said:

Chipmunks are a curse.  Cute as hell, but unbelievably destructive.  Besides never ending attacks on my tomatoes, they cost me $11k this winter.

They built a huge nest inside my gas furnace over the summer. First time we turned the heat on this fall, my wife and I got carbon monoxide poisoning. Because the nest caught on fire as the furnace was running, and didn't vent out the chimney because it was blocked by the nest. While the nest burned, it burned out all the wiring and harnesses and ruined a perfectly good furnace.

2023 is going to be a bad year for chipmunks. Lots of payback coming.:mad:

I use a 5 gallon bucket. Fill about half way with water. Add bird feed on top of water. Put a ramp going up to the rim of the bucket. Add a trail of seed on the ramp. Chipmunks jump in and drown. I've caught a lot this way. Plenty of vids on this if you want more detail.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/14/2023 at 7:54 PM, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Any tips for keeping birds off my young apple trees,last year they plucked a lot of buds/blossoms off.

Before I hang cd's or those bird balloons any tips?...

Really. Never had any issues with birds doing that in all my years with fruit trees. 

what's the secret word for tonight

 

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