Jump to content

2023 Gardening

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

17 mins ago, z-man said:

@rst3 looks like you are getting hammered with rain again. This is getting ridiculous. We are not as bad here in SE MA but I noticed today we have a lot of end rot on the tomatoes. 

End rot is almost always due to a calcium deficiency.  Calmag helps.

The Sultan of Sluggo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 mins ago, bob_G said:

End rot is almost always due to a calcium deficiency.  Calmag helps.

End rot isn’t always from a lack of calcium in the soil.  It can also be from excess nitrogen or fluctuations in soil moisture that reduce the  plant’s ability to consume calcium from the soil.

 

You can spread all the lime or calmag you want, but if your too heavy with the feed bag of miracle grow, then the tomatoes will get end rot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 mins ago, Fitzy said:

End rot isn’t always from a lack of calcium in the soil.  It can also be from excess nitrogen or fluctuations in soil moisture that reduce the  plant’s ability to consume calcium from the soil.

 

 

That's what I said, a calcium deficiency.   I grow over 50 tomatoes each summer. Water regularly, feed with Miracle grow and Calmag.  I might get 5 tomatoes per season with end rot.:)

The Sultan of Sluggo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 min ago, bob_G said:

That's what I said, a calcium deficiency.   I grow over 50 tomatoes each summer. Water regularly, feed with Miracle grow and Calmag.  I might get 5 tomatoes per season with end rot.:)

Read carefully… it is not always from a calcium deficiency.  Too much nitrogen and and fluctuations in soil moisture reduce the plant’s ability to consume calcium.  
 

Calmag may help, but so would a $5 bag of lime.  A gallon of calmag is $50- you can buy a lot of tomatoes for $50.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Fitzy said:

Read carefully… it is not always from a calcium deficiency.  Too much nitrogen and and fluctuations in soil moisture reduce the plant’s ability to consume calcium.  
 

Calmag may help, but so would a $5 bag of lime.  A gallon of calmag is $50- you can buy a lot of tomatoes for $50.

Truth be known, I don't care if Calmag costs $250 a gallon.  The two to three hours a day I spend in my garden are priceless.:)

The Sultan of Sluggo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used lots of bone meal when planting and a few applications of cal mag but I’m guessing that too much 5-1-1 Alaskan Fish fertilizer may account for the blossom end rot on one variety of my tomatoes which also had the healthiest looking foliage.  I sprayed a heavy dose of Stop Rot calcium and cut off 10 rotten tomatoes so far so good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, z-man said:

@rst3 looks like you are getting hammered with rain again. This is getting ridiculous. 

Yep. Picked up another 1-2" yesterday. Rain about as heavy as it gets when the main line pushed through. Just roaring downpours.

 

Luckily didn't get hit by the worst of it yesterday.. when a few towns got 3-4" I think.

 

Definite change in temps and humidity this week, with cooler and drier air. Was supposed to continue unstable, with us still beneath a trough.. but with the lack of moisture/humidity, showers and Tstorms will be suppressed for a bit. Thank chryst.

 

Some July rain totals for MA/CT/RI region 

20230730_174111.jpg.035b282e987f10ce07e34dfd46402058.jpg

 

Fishing kills me exactly as it keeps me alive.

Hemingway, Old Man and the Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/29/2023 at 8:21 AM, Steel Pulse said:

Anyone else dealing with dog vomit slime mold. I have had loads of it this year in the mulch with all this rain.  

IMG_2177.jpeg

 

 

I've seen slime molds on mulch before but didn't know anything about these piles of vomit other than its name. 

 

Found some interesting stuff on the UNH Water and Land Life webpage. Turns out the darn things are ancient amoebas. They have no brain.. but slither around to find food. Weird as chit.

***

Slime Molds

"After extended periods of wet weather, gardeners may be startled to find amorphous clumps of slime covering their bark mulch, lawn, or small garden plants. These fungus look-alikes are actually ancient organisms called slime molds. Despite mold being in its name, slime mold is not a fungus, but rather an ancient lineage of amoebas.

 

Unlike stationary mushrooms that excrete enzymes to break down and absorb their food, slime molds have fluid cell membranes and move around to find sustenance.

 

The feeding stage of slime mold is what is commonly seen in the garden.

 

Slime molds are broken into two general groups: cellular and plasmodial. Plasmodial slime molds are the type most often found creeping across bark mulch. They start life as a single cell that swims or crawls around a substrate (like mulch, fallen leaves, or a rotting log) looking for food. Eventually the single cell fuses with another single cell to form a giant cell called a plasmodium. Although slime mold doesn’t have a brain, it is capable of moving in the direction of food, which mainly consists of bacteria and fungal spores.

 

Slime mold thrives in wet conditions. As soon as its substrate is dry and growing conditions are no longer favorable, the plasmodium will condense and form spore producing structures for reproduction. Spores move in the wind or on animals to colonize new areas during the next spell of wet weather.

 

Though they may look alarming, slime molds are largely harmless in the landscape. They will frequently grow on plants but do not feed on them, only causing damage by blocking light and thereby preventing photosynthesis.

 

The presence of a slime mold only requires intervention if you find its appearance highly disagreeable. Slime molds will disappear on their own when the weather changes, but if you can’t wait, raking them out or scooping them up with a shovel will do the trick.

 

Fungicides are both unnecessary and ineffective. If you’re like me, you’ll enjoy observing this fascinating organism for the brief time it appears in the landscape."

 

:th:

Fishing kills me exactly as it keeps me alive.

Hemingway, Old Man and the Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, rst3 said:

 

I've seen slime molds on mulch before but didn't know anything about these piles of vomit other than its name. 

 

Found some interesting stuff on the UNH Water and Land Life webpage. Turns out the darn things are ancient amoebas. They have no brain.. but slither around to find food. Weird as chit.

***

Slime Molds

"After extended periods of wet weather, gardeners may be startled to find amorphous clumps of slime covering their bark mulch, lawn, or small garden plants. These fungus look-alikes are actually ancient organisms called slime molds. Despite mold being in its name, slime mold is not a fungus, but rather an ancient lineage of amoebas.

 

Unlike stationary mushrooms that excrete enzymes to break down and absorb their food, slime molds have fluid cell membranes and move around to find sustenance.

 

The feeding stage of slime mold is what is commonly seen in the garden.

 

Slime molds are broken into two general groups: cellular and plasmodial. Plasmodial slime molds are the type most often found creeping across bark mulch. They start life as a single cell that swims or crawls around a substrate (like mulch, fallen leaves, or a rotting log) looking for food. Eventually the single cell fuses with another single cell to form a giant cell called a plasmodium. Although slime mold doesn’t have a brain, it is capable of moving in the direction of food, which mainly consists of bacteria and fungal spores.

 

Slime mold thrives in wet conditions. As soon as its substrate is dry and growing conditions are no longer favorable, the plasmodium will condense and form spore producing structures for reproduction. Spores move in the wind or on animals to colonize new areas during the next spell of wet weather.

 

Though they may look alarming, slime molds are largely harmless in the landscape. They will frequently grow on plants but do not feed on them, only causing damage by blocking light and thereby preventing photosynthesis.

 

The presence of a slime mold only requires intervention if you find its appearance highly disagreeable. Slime molds will disappear on their own when the weather changes, but if you can’t wait, raking them out or scooping them up with a shovel will do the trick.

 

Fungicides are both unnecessary and ineffective. If you’re like me, you’ll enjoy observing this fascinating organism for the brief time it appears in the landscape."

 

:th:

 This is really cool!   Sounds like something to base a horror movie on. “Primordial slime  takes on Tokyo”.  

 

Like most things in nature, it sounds like it should be left alone to do its thing. 

Does anyone know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...