R.R. Bridge Fisher

Diesel truck guys?

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So here's an electrical/Code question regarding an outdoor receptacle for a block heater.

My son has (2) 350 turbo diesels and I have a dedicated 20 circuit outside with a outdoor gfci and weather proof cover and molded cord.

On both trucks the block heaters trip the gfci receptacle. 

I'm pretty sure the cords on the trucks are not chafed.

There's a lot about this online both truck and code wise so I'm wondering if anyone has anything they've encountered on this.

I don't want to ditch the gfci because it's an outdoor receptacle. 

Suggestions? 

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What are they drawing for amps?

 

What's at rating on the GFCI?

 

I can't imagine that the block heater would draw more than 20 amps.

 

 

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1 min ago, Gotcow? said:

What are they drawing for amps?

 

What's at rating on the GFCI?

 

I can't imagine that the block heater would draw more than 20 amps.

 

 

Not tripping the circuit just the gfci

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Just now, Gotcow? said:

GFCIs do go bad sometimes.

Brand new,

I read a bunch of articles about road salt and cords in weather. 

Not sure what diesel guys do.

It's getting colder out there.

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Just now, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Brand new,

I read a bunch of articles about road salt and cords in weather. 

Not sure what diesel guys do.

It's getting colder out there.

Plug one in to a non GFCI outlet with extension cord and see what happens.

 

If it's shorted it should trip the panel breaker.

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6 mins ago, Gotcow? said:

Plug one in to a non GFCI outlet with extension cord and see what happens.

 

If it's shorted it should trip the panel breaker.

It doesn't trip the circuit breaker on a standard outlet

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If they are both on the same circuit 20 amps are not enough unless it isnt very cold or you stagger the times the block heaters are running. One circuit for each heater is a smart move.

More than one garage has burnt up using block heaters.

Check for corrosion on the plugs, outlet prongs and where the cord goes in to the heater, If anything looks worn, baked, stiff, or charred toss em.

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Just now, riggler said:

If they are both on the same circuit 20 amps are not enough unless it isnt very cold or you stagger the times the block heaters are running. One circuit for each heater is a smart move.

More than one garage has burnt up using block heaters.

Check for corrosion on the plugs, outlet prongs and where the cord goes in to the heater, If anything looks worn, baked, stiff, or charred toss em.

Only 1 truck is on the road and plgged in, 

I suspect it's the factory cord. everything else I did and it's new.

I Don't know how to change that little short

Factory cord if that's the problem 

 

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1 min ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Only 1 truck is on the road and plgged in, 

I suspect it's the factory cord. everything else I did and it's new.

I Don't know how to change that little short

Factory cord if that's the problem 

 

On my older fords the cord is pushed in to the block heater. Usually they go bad either in the prongs because of corrosion or right where on the cable where it goes in to the plug end. When we start using them (5 degrees and below) we hit the prongs with a bit of sand paper and put a little twist in them to ensure good contact in the outlet.

It might be the heater element is getting ready to go, hence the trip. You could check with a meter for resistance between each prong and the vehicle ? The idea of a gfi here is a good one but anything we ever plugged in to them that was outside never seemed to work out for very long.

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11 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

It doesn't trip the circuit breaker on a standard outlet

I'm thinking your GFCI might just be too sensitive.

 

On the other hand block heaters are usually easy to replace depending on the installation type.

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 I've had GFCI's go bad. I also own 2 F-350 diesels and plug both in on a single 20 amp circuit and have never tripped the GFCI

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13 mins ago, SC said:

 I've had GFCI's go bad. I also own 2 F-350 diesels and plug both in on a single 20 amp circuit and have never tripped the GFCI

It's possible that the new one I installed is bad I guess

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44 mins ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

It's possible that the new one I installed is bad I guess

I'm no electrician but are you sure polarity is correct?

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Odd and slightly off topic…but are these block heaters “needed” to start these ford diesel ? My Cummins 5.9 has never used one in 18 years, and w/ plenty bone chilling mornings. Am i doing it wrong?

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