jjdbike

Measuring bolts for cabinet knobs?

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I know this sounds like a really stupid question. I'm the absolute opposite of handy. We bought a home in a 55 & over community in SoCal. We got what we could afford & we got what we paid for. Not great construction & built in the 60's. (much like myself).

One of the many projects we're dong is replacing the kitchen cabinet knobs. Lots of jerry rigging and "creative carpentry". Many of the cabinets have different thickness in the doors. None of the bolts that came with the knobs it correctly.

Is there an easy way to figure out ho long of a bolt I need for each? Is there an easy way to cut bolts that are too long down to size? The only cutting top I own is a Dremel.

I'd appreciate any help you can offer.

Thanks in advance.

JD

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Easy peasy bud. Measure the thickness of each door/drawer ( dont have to be too precise ) and get bolts 1/4 - 3/8" longer. Older drawers ore often thicker than the doors. I forget the thread size off hand, but I have little plastic jars of about four sizes in stock. For just such occasions. 

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If ya have to cut one/some, ya just need a nut to thread on first. Then clamp and cut. Dremel will work. Unthread the nut after the you cut the bolt, and the nut will clean up the threads. 

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Posted (edited)

If you really have off sizes, get one of these electrical strippers, they have cutting holes for the 8-32 screws that are used on knobs.  See those holes around the joint screw? You can cleanly cut off any non-hardened screw. Plus its a very handy tool to have around the house for wiring.  @Ben Lippen much easier than a Dremel! I even use it on 10-24 stainless, but it requires a good grip, which I'm certain you have.

 

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Edited by gellfex

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35 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

If ya have to cut one/some, ya just need a nut to thread on first. Then clamp and cut. Dremel will work. Unthread the nut after the you cut the bolt, and the nut will clean up the threads. 

The nut to clean up the thread is a good tip.   If you won't want to deal with the Dremel, look into the snap off machine screws  . They are designed to let you cut off every 1/4 inch of so.  Easy to find at a big box store. You can snap them off with pliers..They have big heads so are designed for applications like cabinet pulls,

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You can push the screw into the cabinet letting the long end stick out the front. Then simply mark 1/4" longer than the front and cut with screw cutters.

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What Ben said is spot on.

 

Usually a 1/4" longer is enough.  Some knobs have recessed threads so you may need a little longer.

 

Some pulls can be alittle tricky depending on how much thread they could run.  Sometimes a 1/4" is a tad long.

 

The technical term are truss screws.  8/32 thread.

 

You can also get "breakoff" truss screws which are basically 2" long screws that have breaks in the threads to cut them to length.

 

Unless the threads are metric on the hardware.  Then you will need metric screws and they do make those in the breakaway option also

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Screw the screw into the knob first. Take measurement . Then add the thickness of the door and make it an 1/8 shorter then the total length.  

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Thanks everyone.

Snap off screws and washers to make up any difference did the trick. Easy peasy.

You guys have helped me a lot on many issues. Much appreciated from a non handy guy.

Best Regards.

JD

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