gellfex

Seriously moisture proof mahogany finish?

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So I made this lid for a stainless countertop compost pot out of some scrap mahogany I laminated together and gave it 2 coats of tung oil. Not enough. the moisture in the compostables causes the bottom to absorb moisture and the whole thing potato chips. Any suggestions as to what I can do at this point? Obviously let it dry out, but should/can I put urethane over the tung, or more tung, or strip it and urethane from scratch, or what? Wood just ain't my thing!

 

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Looks like you did a nice job on that lid, but I think I would go for a metal lid just to save the annoyance of the wood. Your going to have moisture and gasses emitting from that container. Wood is probably a poor choice.

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1 hour ago, giant basshole said:

Looks like you did a nice job on that lid, but I think I would go for a metal lid just to save the annoyance of the wood. Your going to have moisture and gasses emitting from that container. Wood is probably a poor choice.

Yeah, both my Grandpas would have made one out of sheet copper! Wood just sucks, metal is in my blood. But I was trying to do what seemed like the sensible thing that anyone else would do, and make it out of wood.

 

If they had made a stainless top to match this steam table service bucket I used, I would not have bothered. But the only one they made had a cut out for a spoon.

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Posted (edited)

west system epoxy on my swim step and coaming has held up very well....also very durable .....on my 25 year old kayak

use their 207 special hardener

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Edited by Rmarsh

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4 hours ago, Rmarsh said:

west system epoxy on my swim step and coaming has held up very well....also very durable .....on my 25 year old kayak

use their 207 special hardener

 

No doubt, but buying that expensive product for freaking lid is not something my cheapness will allow. This was a little DIY project!

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Any very slow curing bar top epoxy would work

Rub it in really well, do 2 or 3 coats

 

The only possible issue is the tung oil already in there, could create an adhesion issue. You might have to use a solvent first.

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I used three coats of Spar Urethane on my mahogany exterior door at my old house, and it was pretty good. After 15 years it had faded a bit thru sun and weather exposure, but it was still waterproof, no pitting/pealing/chipping and the wood was well protected. 

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2nd for the marine spar varnish.  You're going to have to hit the tung oil with some mineral spirits 1st and use an oil-based varnish.  I like the Man-O-War.  I did a walnut slab in my bathroom for a vanity 10 years ago with it and it still looks just as good as new.

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1 hour ago, Gilbey said:

I used three coats of Spar Urethane on my mahogany exterior door at my old house, and it was pretty good. After 15 years it had faded a bit thru sun and weather exposure, but it was still waterproof, no pitting/pealing/chipping and the wood was well protected. 

Might work, but there's a big difference between normal outdoor conditions and being a lid on a wet bucket. Tung is normally considered a pretty good weather resistant finish too.

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I keep a small stainless compost bucket on my countertop. The lid has holes and there is an activated charcoal filter on the underside. It works fairly well in that there are no odors emanating (but I empty it quite often), however there is always still a little moisture inside the bucket. 

  I was you, I would drill holes, seal the crap out of it, then fill the holes with charcoal filter.  Best of both worlds. 

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15 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

I keep a small stainless compost bucket on my countertop. The lid has holes and there is an activated charcoal filter on the underside. It works fairly well in that there are no odors emanating (but I empty it quite often), however there is always still a little moisture inside the bucket. 

  I was you, I would drill holes, seal the crap out of it, then fill the holes with charcoal filter.  Best of both worlds. 

It gets emptied often enough that smell is not an issue. 

 

I'm seriously considering turning a disc the size of the portion that sits inside the bucket, and then using that to vacuum form a piece of thin clear PETG that I'd glue on as a liner for everything in contact with the moisture. You'd never see it, especially if I cut it back 1/8" from the outer rim.

 

Crazy that I was able to get the perfect size stainless bucket at a restaurant supply for under $10, but they didn't have a lid and I'm going to all this trouble!

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2 hours ago, gellfex said:

I'm seriously considering turning a disc the size of the portion that sits inside the bucket, and then using that to vacuum form a piece of thin clear PETG that I'd glue on as a liner for everything in contact with the moisture. You'd never see it, especially if I cut it back 1/8" from the outer rim.

Yeah, that's way easier than drilling a few holes and stuffing them with something...

Yup.

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24 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

Yeah, that's way easier than drilling a few holes and stuffing them with something...

Yup.

But the venting doesn't solve the moisture issue, it'll still be very, very moist in there, leaving me with my original problem of having to refinish the wood. Not to mention turning a disc of MDF and popping it on the vacuum former is not a very time consuming job.

 

I'm pretty sure I have some 1/32" PETG sheets, so I'm spending nothing, as opposed to buying expensive epoxy resin. If I were a plug or rod maker and had it sitting around that would be a different story...

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Pretty sure I have some bar top epoxy laying around from my plug and rod building days. I'd be happy to send you some if you are interested. You would only need a few ounces for that small a piece. Just let me know. 

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