Herefishyfishyyy

Dedicated shore togging reel

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Posted (edited)

Hi all,

 

I am currently thinking about upgrading the reel on my shore togging setup during the off-season, and was looking for some input/suggestions. 
 

As it currently stands I have a Daiwa BG 4000 spooled with 65lb braid (occasionally alternate between a Spinfisher VI 4500 spooled with 65lb braid) paired with a 10’6 St Croix Legend - I aimed for the lightest setup possible, and this combination has been great.  However, I have noticed that the cranking power on both reels struggle with keeper sized fish.  Is it because of the quality of these reels, the size, gear ratio, or something else?  With that said, I am thinking about upgrading to a slightly larger reel (5000 or 6000 class) while still maintaining the lightest set up possible with 65lb of braid - line capacity is not a concern, but cranking power is. With a $200 budget, I have narrowed it down to to the Spheros SW A 6000 and the Shimano 20 Stradic SW 5000PG/6000PG. It’s probably not a fair comparison given one is a JDM based reel, however, I am not concerned about service/parts. I am leaning heavily towards the Stradic 5000PG 
 

Any thoughts or suggestions?

 

Thanks!

Edited by Herefishyfishyyy

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The cheapest route to more torque is a conventional reel. Getting more torque in a spinning reel means $$$, a Penn Torque (just discontinued, look for a sale) or some muscular Japanese reel. I don't know if a ZB, VS, or IRT spinner would offer a major increase in torque or not.

 

Gentlemen?

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Posted (edited)

Yeah I have to agree with the others. There are some great spinning reels that are super rigid and put out great torque like the stella or daiwa satliga dogfight, even the Penn slammer 3, but they are all much more expensive

 

in the 200$ price range there are many great conventional and like the avets, daiwa saltist, shims no toriums and more. Those reels all put out more torque than similarly priced spinning reels. I use an avet 5.3 mxj g2, it’s a great reel for shore and boat togging, it’s light and narrow but has no problem winching double digit tog out of the rocks. Avets are on sale at jandh currently, and I just picked up another one for like 240$, that’s including them spooling 300yds of 50lb PowerPro and shipping 

 

the daiwa bg, daiwa eliminator, and daiwa bg mq are all in the 99-200$ range which look to be pretty solid if you’re focused on a spinner

Edited by EliasA

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14 mins ago, EliasA said:

Yeah I have to agree with the others. There are some great spinning reels that are super rigid and put out great torque like the stella or daiwa satliga dogfight, even the Penn slammer 3, but they are all much more expensive

 

in the 200$ price range there are many great conventional and like the avets, daiwa saltist, shims no toriums and more. Those reels all put out more torque than similarly priced spinning reels

 

the daiwa bg, daiwa eliminator, and daiwa bg mq are all in the 99-200$ range which look to be pretty solid if you’re focused on a spinner

Hi everyone - thanks for the feedback. Point noted about the benefits of a conventional. At this point in time I am targeting a “better” spinning reel than the 4000 Daiwa BG and the 4500 Spinfisher VI that can be paired with my existing rod.  Going the conventional reel route will require another rod to go with it, which I don’t have the budget for at the moment unfortunately.  I have found that both reels are hard to retrieve/turn the handle when there is a larger fish hooked up.  What spec should I be looking for on a spinner that  would alleviate this issue - the gear ratio?  Or something else?

 

Would the Spheros or the JDM Stradic make sense as a step up from the BG and Spinfisher?  Or is there another offering in this budget range?


Thanks!

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"Would the Spheros or the JDM Stradic make sense as a step up from the BG and Spinfisher?  Or is there another offering in this budget range?"

 

Elias would know better than I, but IMHO .... no. What you're seeking in a spinner just ain't to be had for short money.  Best bet is to look for a Torque spinner on closeout.

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@ksong , a comment is appreciated. Would a 400-500 IRT reel give him the torque he wants? He's already been warned, this is going to cost him.

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Can't recall too many throwing conventionals at tog on the rocks, at locations I typically go to, so not sure why there'd be a need for that drastic a change. And to be clear I'm no reel knowledge base, but I would guess a bigger spinner will help. Though I've also observed some technicians crush tog with ultralight setups and tiny reels, so I'm not fully keyed into what your issue is either. Next time you go out see what people on the next rock over are using and compare. Still a ways til off season to gather info.

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Cranking is not a design feature of most spinners. Pump the fish in, and torque is not that relevant.

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I'd say shorten your rod if possible. And if for some reason you actually need the torque separate of that - a larger reel helps.

 

A smaller handled reel prevents you from applying force efficiently.

 

 

 

I've used the JDM Stradic SW 6000 and it has plenty of power, but my Certate SW 8000 is just so much more comfortable to crank with.

 

 

Another question would be based on your spot(s) - inlets require more cranking and less pumping, far more rocky holes for a tog to dive into - so you want to shorten their tether.

 

Cliff shores/shorelines/dock or bridge structure are better to pump the rod instead due to fewer hiding spots for a hooked fish.

 

 

Weigh your options, hope this helps.

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2 hours ago, ermghoti said:

Cranking is not a design feature of most spinners. Pump the fish in, and torque is not that relevant.

This^
 

assuming the reels have the same gear ratio, spool width and handle length they’ll about equal in cranking power. Some reels have bigger main gears or different gear layouts which may give a teeny tiny advantage, but they’re all just really similar. A van staal vs a Penn torque vs a shimano gosa vs a daiwa bg all really have about the same cranking power (assuming they’re the same size) because it’s just not a measured metric for spinning reels

 

try to pick pick a reel with a lower gear ratio, lots of inches per turn, and a big handle. The larger the spool the better, but keep it balanced, don’t throw an 1800 size reel on a med heavy rod. You can add longer cranking handles from aftermarket companies which actually will give you more leverage and slightly more cranking power, and IMO a round power knob style grip feels much more comfortable in the hand while cranking

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11 hours ago, ermghoti said:

Cranking is not a design feature of most spinners. Pump the fish in, and torque is not that relevant.

Yup. Exactly this. If anything get something high gear ratio so you can pump/reel faster. You don't just crank the fish in.

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12 hours ago, ermghoti said:

Cranking is not a design feature of most spinners. Pump the fish in, and torque is not that relevant.

That was my thought.

 

Just lift the fish with the rod.  Cranking is inefficient.

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I could be an oddball here but the first thing that came to my mind is why reel in?  Wouldn't that put stress on gears and all the other things, especially for something like Tog?

 

I enjoy Togging and now more targeting Sheepshead.  I have no problem pumping the rod and caught my PB 21.5" Tog and 26" Sheepshead with Stradic FL 5000.

 

I, like you, wanted the lightest setup possible as holding the rod from sunrise to sunset is hard and saving of every oz helped me.  I went through a couple of different setups but now I'm using Okuma Rockaway HD 9' which I believe is 9.5oz and Stradic FL 5000 as mentioned.  Those 2 combines are hair under 20oz which was the weight of the reel alone when I started Togging.  What I started was probably 31oz for both rod and reel.

 

So far, this is the lightest setup that I was able to find to handle any Tog and Sheepshead, able to swing it on a Jetty and have enough lines for other fish.  I've caught decent size Ray, 28' Red Drum, occasional low 20" Stripers, and Bluefish and had no problem

 

I don't know if you can find any lighter setup unless you get a shorter rod that can handle the above.

 

 

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Another note is that for me, I cast a lot.  I don't just cast and wait forever which means I have to crank in hundreds of times a day. That's hard to do after a while especially when the current is ripping and you have 3-4oz sinker.  Good to have higher gear for pumping the rod but at the same time, you don't want too high of gear unless you don't cast as many times as I do.

 

That said, Stradic 5000 works for me.  I feel the pull when the current is moving hard but 99% time, it's all good.

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