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Anti replenishment - New Jersey Coastal Alliance FB page

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Anyone on FB should go join. Ross Kushner is getting it done

 

Tim OKed this conversation, unfortunately the software won't allow links so please any reference keep it to plain text

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NJ Coastal Alliance Says Army Corps Beach Projects Doing More Harm Than Good At The Jersey Shore
BY PHIL STILTON
 
TOMS RIVER, NJ – The New Jersey Coastal Alliance today said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beach replenishment work at the Jersey Shore is causing more harm than good as mayors up and don’t the coast clamor for another round of sand this week. 

 

A Mother’s Day nor’easter washed tons upon tons of sand from the Jersey Shore from Cape May to Sandy hook, leaving many beaches with steep high cliffs and narrow beaches, despite a recent major beach replenishment project by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

 

The hardest hit was Ortley Beach, a beach town that was ground zero during Superstorm Sandy. It was also the site where local officials are now saying a sinkhole swallowed and killed a teen digging in the sand with his sister earlier this week.

The mayor of that town, Maurice Hill immediately shook his fist in the air at the Army Corps of Engineers to fix it, but the federal government has rejected his request. 25% of the public beach access in Ortley Beach will be closed for Memorial Day. Hill is now seeking emergency funding to dump more sand on the beach, a move the New Jersey Coastal Alliance says might not be the best move.

 

Related: Officials Say Sinkhole Swallowed Teen Who Died at Toms River Beach Caused by Unstable Sand


“The press has been covering dangerous beach conditions created in the wake of coastal storms. These have resulted in the formation of sand cliffs. This is often referred to in these articles as erosion caused by storms. However, we believe the Army Corps of Engineers’ work has caused this situation, not coastal storms,” the alliance said today. “Our beaches normally have offshore sandbars that run parallel to the beach. There may be 2 or more of these bars as you go out from shore, each deeper than the next. As ocean swells some rolling in, the rule is that these swells break into waves when they reach a water depth less than 1.3 times the swell height.”


The destruction of these offshore sandbars is creating harsher conditions at the shoreline, the group says, which is causing more erosion than before the federal beach replenishment project.

“On a gentle day the swells can be 2 feet high and break close to shore. But bigger, more powerful swells as high as 8-10 feet break far out from shore when they reach the outermost sandbar, expending their energy there,” the group claims.

 

“Today, the Army Corps projects have buried these sandbars, creating a beach profile that goes from dry beach to deep water very quickly. The waves roll in, unbroken, with all their power intact. The waves carve at the beach face, creating sand cliffs, and cutting back at the new wall of sand. You see the result in the attached photos,” said Ross Kushner, of the Alliance. “Eventually the ocean will recreate the sandbars, but it takes years. Often just in time for the next “replenishment” project to destroy them,”


Kushner said all you have to do is look at New Jersey’s natural beaches like Island Beach State Park which have been free of meddling from development and restoration. Instead, beach dunes grow naturally and the offshore topography is designed by nature.

“So, we believe this “erosion” has little to do with storms. Visit a more natural beach such as Island Beach State Park or Sandy Hook and little damage from these storms occurs. We must stop blaming the ocean for conditions that may be actually created by the Army Corps at a cost of hundreds of millions,” Kushner added.

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“As for sinkholes like the one in Toms River, Kushner and his group believe those problems are manmade,” he said. “We are certain these sinkholes are a function of the Army Corps beach replenishment. From our standpoint, this work is performed in the cheapest, fastest way, not the safest. Their goal is to fulfill a contract, not to provide a safe, quality experience for the beach-going public.”

 

Kusher also said hazardous sand cliffs are a signature feature of beaches that have been newly replenished by the Army Corps of Engineers.

“These are rare where Army Corp projects have not changed the structure of the beach,” he added. “Depositing enormous amounts of sand on a beach without properly compacting this material is a recipe for disaster. There are also the dangers posed by shore-break waves and the sudden appearance of sand cliffs.”

The problem is not specific to New Jersey either. In 2018, the Baltimore Sun warned of hazardous beach conditions caused by federal beach replenishment projects in Ocean City, Maryland.

 

“Some who watch the waves closely, including researchers and surfers, say the work can give the beach an unnatural profile that increases the risks of injuries and drownings,” the Sun reported. “There is no firm data to connect what is known as beach renourishment or replenishment to hazards, said Greg Dusek, a senior scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Ocean Service, but the engineering undoubtedly changes beaches’ shape and wave patterns. That requires swimmers and surfers to pay closer attention to rip currents or powerful waves that break directly on shore.”

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Interesting article, thanks for sharing…I hope this gains traction!! 
 

The last few paragraphs that speak of the steep drop off being a signature feature is something I never understood… 

 

that steep drop off is inevitable with sand replenishment , given time and tides… and is kind of like an oxymoron where you want to create more beach for people to enjoy… but at the same time creating one of the most dangerous features on a beach for someone who is unfamiliar with the water (at least 75% of beach goers in the summer). It never made sense to me… 

 

you and I may look at the water and see the under water features… but some little kids who can hardly swim - playing in the ‘shallow’ water might find themselves in trouble very quickly… 

 

this reason alone should raise caution in continuing this practice… it’s kinda common sense… 

 

 

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Nobody should be allowed on the beach so that the natural dunes and dune fauna can grow with being pounded snd stepped on

if we are going to let people on the beach and destroy the natural dunes and fauna then we need to replenish the beach

 

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Just engineer and build back the Jetty's as required and stop this Corrupt System of Money Laundering......omo.

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So if the sand bars off the beach received replenishment would they quell nor'easter and that sand be washed onto the beach :shrug:

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You could stop the erosion by putting wave breaks parallel to the shore but then the surf rats would cry.

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3 hours ago, bass-o-matic said:

You could stop the erosion by putting wave breaks parallel to the shore but then the surf rats would cry.

Often thought rocks parallel to the beach with breaks, I guess there is a reason they don't do it.

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Posted (edited)

I’m all for efforts against replenishment, but I don’t think that this is the best angle. One picture of a “cliff” in IBSP essentially disproves this argument. They form there, and they formed on the town beaches before replenishment. As for the hole, that was in ocean beach, 2 towns north of ortley, and i’m not so sure that it was a sinkhole. 
 

Also, the sandbars reformed in the areas around me. Not always quite what they were, but it’s only been 4/5 years since replenishment. The ecosystem is just beginning to recover. 

Edited by SurfCaster01289

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3 hours ago, bass-o-matic said:

You could stop the erosion by putting wave breaks parallel to the shore but then the surf rats would cry.

One of the reasons why this is not the best argument to make against replenishment. 

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In the Rockaway's, we are past mid way in the installation of jetties, I have been here for over 20 years (a Rockaway new comer) and have watched the pumped in sand work its' way from east to west and fill in the beach at Breezy Point and beyond, creating a huge sand bar. The new jetties as installed, seem to be doing the trick. The 135st,140,145 and 149 st have effectively slowed (I don't think you can actually stop sand movement) and rebuilt the beaches in the area. It's probably the most costly way to hold onto sand, but for now, we are shoveling" sand" against the tide.

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There was a discussion in South Jersey to remove some of the Cold Spring inlet rocks a short distance from the tip. The idea being to let the sand from Wildwood Crest to the Cape May beaches. Don't know how it stands now.

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15 hours ago, browndrake said:

I’m not seeing their page on fb. 
What’s the exact name to search for?

The name to look for is New Jersey Coastal Alliance.

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14 hours ago, SurfCaster01289 said:

I’m all for efforts against replenishment, but I don’t think that this is the best angle. One picture of a “cliff” in IBSP essentially disproves this argument. They form there, and they formed on the town beaches before replenishment. As for the hole, that was in ocean beach, 2 towns north of ortley, and i’m not so sure that it was a sinkhole. 
 

Also, the sandbars reformed in the areas around me. Not always quite what they were, but it’s only been 4/5 years since replenishment. The ecosystem is just beginning to recover. 

The scarping you get on natural beaches is lower in height and generally comes and goes. But on replenished beaches it tends to stay forever or at least a long time. As soon as the recent Deal/Loch Arbour/Allenhurst project was complete sand cliffs 5-feet high appeared and they now cover half a mile in that area. They have been there every day since February. In an interview the Army Corps admitted this is a result of their sand pumping, as the beach "adjusts" back to a natural profile. To make matters worse, towns signed an agreement with the state saying they would remove these sand cliffs, but they don't. 

 

Unfortunately sandbars that form in 4-5 years don't do you any good, because replenishment is typically repeated every 3-5 years.   

 

Also, I have never seen a sinkhole on a NJ beach that wasn't replenished. On replenished beaches they are common. On the usual construction site that amount of fill would be compacted and allowed to settle for months before anyone was allowed on it. On beach replenishment sites they pump it and they're done.

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