Jaysurf631

Togging from shore for beginners

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Go to a jetty along an inlet. I use Mustad Tog hooks size 5 and usually 2 or 3 oz sinkers. Get a couple dozen green crabs, cast close to rocks, you will go through a lot of terminal gear. Be prepared to re-tie a lot. I use a long rod and heavy line, you have to get them out fast once hook or they will run and snag you in the rocks. 

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Elks, if you have access to used spark plugs, tie to your heavy line with 10lb mono get snagged just break them off 

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Far from a tog guru but I like to fish for them. More fun to catch than to eat in mho. That said as stated they are structure oriented and consume structure related food. So crabs (all kinds), mussels and they eat clam and sand fleas (moles) as well just to mention a few. What I learned is nothing is written in stone so togging requires putting your time in. Established structure the older and the more sea life encrusted the better. Some days the bite is on the first drop others it's forty five minutes later. Fished slack water yesterday and the bite was on the first drop and caught three shorts and a surprise croaker. Went back today and didn't get a touch on the slack and got two at the beginning of the ebb. I may be wrong but tog seem primarily visual feeders more than scent. So water visibility is important.

 

It seems like most back water fish the best time is an hour and a half before and after high water. I find the tog bite to be distinctive from the rapid bite of other fish. Once you get "that" bite hang in that spot and build the bite and experiment as small changes make a difference. On one occasion had a lot of small bait stealers so I would cut the crab in half and leave the shell attached. Stopped getting bites took the shell off a caught tog. During fast moving water I stockpile the waste fro crab cutting and toss them in during slack water, might be good or bad who knows. I've decided that if the current is strong and the water dirty I'm leaving, those conditions haven't worked for me.

 

Rigs, I keep it simple two overhand knots for the weight and the same for the hook (1/0 or 2/0) about six inches above the weight using 30lb leader material. The rigs don't last too long from snags and chaffing. I like fishing jig heads but three bucks per gets a little old. The most important thing in my opinion is the lightest weight needed to hold bottom and let them eat it.

 

Jumped around a little, Good Luck.

 

 

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I go green, i literally pick up rocks as a  weight.

Tie with food twine and expect it to break off on snags.

 

Or just use a bucktail hooked with crabs.

 

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Mixed success for me but my rigging has worked well for snag management so keep that part in mind. (Feel free to tell me where I’m wrong. I’ll be happy for constructive criticism iffin you guys can keep it constructive hehe. )
 

Tie braid to “heavy” leader via your preferred knot. I like FG or PR but uni to uni or Alberto will do. 
 

So, start with that heavy leader being 40-50 lbs or more. Tie a loop knot in that one around 6-12” - shorter is preferred for me but you experiment to find your preference. I like a lefty Kreh loop knot because the tag end faces down and the knot is pretty low profile looking down at it it meaning less to catch between two touching rocks/boulders. 
 

Attach your terminal rig (tied in lighter leader material) to that loop. You can tie direct to the loop like tying to a swivel or put a loop in the rig & loop to loop connect. Use a rig of 30 lbs or less so it breaks off past the “heavy leader.”

 

(I don’t use swivels for fishing rocks & pilings.)

As for rigs - other guys will have better advice due to more experience but I usually go dropper loop & hook facing up. Jigs are all the rage though. You can use this set up for tog jigs and still only worry about busting off the last part of your setup instead of retying the whole thing from the braid to the sinker. 

 

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7 mins ago, EricL said:

I go green, i literally pick up rocks as a  weight.

Tie with food twine and expect it to break off on snags.

 

Or just use a bucktail hooked with crabs.

 

Yes, I was about to add that bringing some thread or something to tie a rock with & at worst some superglue is better than busting off spark plugs to stay permanently in the rocks. 

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A few times I have used FW grade hooks as long as they were sturdy enough. They’ll rust out quickly but that’s actually a good thing for the rigs getting snagged. I don’t reuse those rigs from one trip to the next anyway. 

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18 mins ago, EricL said:

I go green, i literally pick up rocks as a  weight.

Tie with food twine and expect it to break off on snags.

 

Or just use a bucktail hooked with crabs.

 

One time I actually pre-tied cheap eagle claw swivels to rocks as the attachment point. It was a true rig ready “sinker.”

 

That was before we had 4 kids! 

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42 mins ago, squidder 329 said:

Far from a tog guru but I like to fish for them. More fun to catch than to eat in mho. That said as stated they are structure oriented and consume structure related food. So crabs (all kinds), mussels and they eat clam and sand fleas (moles) as well just to mention a few. What I learned is nothing is written in stone so togging requires putting your time in. Established structure the older and the more sea life encrusted the better. Some days the bite is on the first drop others it's forty five minutes later. Fished slack water yesterday and the bite was on the first drop and caught three shorts and a surprise croaker. Went back today and didn't get a touch on the slack and got two at the beginning of the ebb. I may be wrong but tog seem primarily visual feeders more than scent. So water visibility is important.

 

It seems like most back water fish the best time is an hour and a half before and after high water. I find the tog bite to be distinctive from the rapid bite of other fish. Once you get "that" bite hang in that spot and build the bite and experiment as small changes make a difference. On one occasion had a lot of small bait stealers so I would cut the crab in half and leave the shell attached. Stopped getting bites took the shell off a caught tog. During fast moving water I stockpile the waste fro crab cutting and toss them in during slack water, might be good or bad who knows. I've decided that if the current is strong and the water dirty I'm leaving, those conditions haven't worked for me.

 

Rigs, I keep it simple two overhand knots for the weight and the same for the hook (1/0 or 2/0) about six inches above the weight using 30lb leader material. The rigs don't last too long from snags and chaffing. I like fishing jig heads but three bucks per gets a little old. The most important thing in my opinion is the lightest weight needed to hold bottom and let them eat it.

 

Jumped around a little, Good Luck.

 

 

Awsome ! Thanks so much for the reply 

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19 mins ago, EricDice said:

Mixed success for me but my rigging has worked well for snag management so keep that part in mind. (Feel free to tell me where I’m wrong. I’ll be happy for constructive criticism iffin you guys can keep it constructive hehe. )
 

Tie braid to “heavy” leader via your preferred knot. I like FG or PR but uni to uni or Alberto will do. 
 

So, start with that heavy leader being 40-50 lbs or more. Tie a loop knot in that one around 6-12” - shorter is preferred for me but you experiment to find your preference. I like a lefty Kreh loop knot because the tag end faces down and the knot is pretty low profile looking down at it it meaning less to catch between two touching rocks/boulders. 
 

Attach your terminal rig (tied in lighter leader material) to that loop. You can tie direct to the loop like tying to a swivel or put a loop in the rig & loop to loop connect. Use a rig of 30 lbs or less so it breaks off past the “heavy leader.”

 

(I don’t use swivels for fishing rocks & pilings.)

As for rigs - other guys will have better advice due to more experience but I usually go dropper loop & hook facing up. Jigs are all the rage though. You can use this set up for tog jigs and still only worry about busting off the last part of your setup instead of retying the whole thing from the braid to the sinker. 

 

Awsome. Thanks!

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Posted (edited)

20 mins ago, EricDice said:

Yes, I was about to add that bringing some thread or something to tie a rock with & at worst some superglue is better than busting off spark plugs to stay permanently in the rocks. 

It works well. I buy a roll of twine from the 99c store. Or just grab some from the kitchen. A roll last hella long. 

 

A good rock can be 1-5oz. I tied it like how you can a cookiebox or package. Once over, crisscross it, Overhand knot.   Then use another piece to make a 6" to 12" loop to attach rock to One eye of a regular swivel at the end of the leader. Hook trace on other end. 

 

9 outta 10. Either the twine breaks or the lighter trace breaks.

Edited by EricL

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8 hours ago, EricL said:

I go green, i literally pick up rocks as a  weight.

Tie with food twine and expect it to break off on snags.

 

Or just use a bucktail hooked with crabs.

 

This is a great idea.   :th:

 

Just make sure the twine is all natural.  Jute or cotton.   

There is poly kitchen string out there.  I used to get into it with my old boss.  He'd grab anything off the shelf if we needed it.   I wouldn't want that roast tied with poly string, he dgaf.   

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