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Gloves for wading

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Went out last night to fish the surf in waders for the first time and somehow forgot that my hands might need to stay warm too. Wound up having to take a few more breaks than I would have liked to keep good dexterity. Wondering what others use for wading gloves? Preferably waterproof / resistant, and braid friendly. 

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In before the lock

 

 

JK

 

 

Somebody will be along to tell you that you need to become as tough as nails (no gloves) in order to be a true surfcaster. I'm not that guy. I'm the guy to tell you the obvious: you will lose dexterity if you wear gloves that can keep you warm. I know a guy who put latex/nitrile gloves under Gorilla Grip gloves and said they provided warmth and kept some dexterity until the latex got flooded. I've worn some waterproof neoprene gloves that were passable (could barely feel enough to throw light lures, but heavy jigs were easy) in January. I'm sure I could have got used to them (but I got frustrated due to lack of sensation/feedback). Personally, I wear Gorilla Grips whenever surfcasting. They provided a tiny amount of warmth, protect my casting finger from braid slices, and I usually have cuts on my hands so I think I'm getting some protection from infections (barnacles, fish slime, nose picking).

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It’s tough. My hands have a history of cold injuries (frost nip, etc.) so cold definitely affects me more than most other people and in my experience nothing truly “works”. My strategy is to have several pairs of light liner or wool gloves on me and I switch them out as they get wet. Somewhat tolerable that way, though there have been nights in early spring/late fall where I just couldn’t do it after a while. 

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I've tried the gorilla grips with a nitrile glove under, but I prefer wetsuit gloves. I have a pair of O'Neill psyco tech gloves, the 1.5mm versions. They're nice, not too thick and with a o ring seal around the wrist. The 1.5mm aren't the warmest when the water is real cold, and I almost wish I got the 2mm for colder water

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If it's really chilly there is no glove that will warm wet hands, carry a few chemical hand warmers to slip in ...I switch off between two pair of Simms fingerless wool gloves, waterproof neoprene's cut off circulation and you have no tactile feel with them, even when not cold.

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For me I’ve Tried several brands of neoprene gloves and they agitate my skin. Best thing I found is the military style wool glove liners and heavy rubber gloves over that. My hands are still cold and need to take a break. Largest pair of Atlas brand I picked up a pack on Amazon. I can cast well enough and unhook fish and swap plugs but really nothing else than that. 

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I hate gloves and will even ice fish without them.  Using them instead to warm up in-between fish.  Hand warmers in a pocket are great.  You can get more than one outing by putting them in a ziplock bag between trips and draining out any air.

 

I have tried all types of tech gloves and gotta say that fingerless wool gloves, with the mitten flap are still the best.   Wool will still keep you warm when they eventually get wet, which they will.  If you somehow keep your hands dry an entire outing you probably met the skunk....

 

 

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No gloves keep you dry that enable you to cast...i use a thin pair of work gloves with hand warmers stuffed inside. When it gets too cold in done

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Appreciate the replies guys. I wasn't so much looking to stay toasty warm and dry, but rather just take a bit of the sting out of the cold. I have some ice climbing gloves that seem like they would work okay, but I was hoping there was a pair of neoprene gloves or the like out there that would fit the bill. Ton to chose from online, but seems like from the replies that none of them are all that great. I may experiment with some thin wool ones as suggested here and see how that goes.

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Work gloves from HD that are nitrile dipped work well for me - at least for the 45 to 50ish degree weather, just to take the bite off... they are cheap enough that you can buy a couple and keep some in your waders to trade out to keep warm.  

 

They make some that are fleece lined that work well for colder weather. 

 

They arnt totally water proof, some better then others. 

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I fish gloves even in the summer, as it helps lessen the surface area that the Squitos can suck the blood out of me.

I simply buy those 3 pairs  for $12 gloves at homies or Lowes, I have a can of  liquid flex seal that I will dip my casting finger in.

Once dry I have a set of 3 pairs of gloves that normally last me a season.

Granted they won't really insulate once the weather goes cold but it keeps enough of the chill out that I find them effective.

I don't think there are going to be a lot of gloves out there that won't get ripped to shred casting once the glove gets wet and you are casting braid.

Even the expensive divers gloves are going to get chewed up with casting braid in the wet environment especially if you are fishing the open beach during the fall.

 

Don't know if that helps you, but it's a cheap way to  an effective end for me. 

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On 9/25/2022 at 5:21 PM, surfrat59 said:

If it's really chilly there is no glove that will warm wet hands, carry a few chemical hand warmers to slip in ...I switch off between two pair of Simms fingerless wool gloves, waterproof neoprene's cut off circulation and you have no tactile feel with them, even when not cold.

Can’t have tight gloves - at least for me - even a little tight. 
 

Explore loose fitting options- wool if possible. The optional flaps are great for occasional use. 

  • can’t overload the plug bag in “glove season” due to snagging the material while switching. 
  • Must keep your core warm to keep circulation in your hands & feet. Otherwise your nervous system pulls the blood back inside to protect your core. 
  • Jog to a new spot to bump your temp up if needed. (Especially at night because you’ll get spot mugged by the binocular crew running during the day, lol.)
  • cut slits at key pressure points in the gloves if needed to promote blood flow. 

 

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