oax

Soylent Green (sort of)

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Cremation and traditional burial is frowned upon by urbanists and environmentalists as a waste of resources and harmful to the climate.  A new procedure is now being pushed in the states of Vermont, Washington, Oregon, Colorado and California where human remains are being turned into compost.  The process known as natural organic reduction (NOR) is where human remains are placed into an 8-foot-long steel box with biodegradable materials such as wood chips, straw and alfalfa.  Microbes break down the body and plant matter turning it into nutrient-rich compost in 30-60 days; each corpse yields about one cubic yard.  The compost is then “cured” for several weeks and either returned to the bereaved family for use in their flower/vegetable gardens or donated for use in public conversation areas.

 

Personally I'm not comfortable turning people into human compost, at best it seems disrespectful and also sets a gruesome precedent for the future.  Do you think this is a good thing or just another ridiculous edict from the greens?

 

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4 mins ago, Billybob said:

What happens to the bones?

Families can make necklaces outta them.

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3 mins ago, Billybob said:

What happens to the bones?

As per the Recompose website:

 

"The human composting process breaks down bones and teeth through a combination of microbial and mechanical means.  The microbes are assisted by mechanical steps to help complete the transformation into soil."

 

Perhaps a wood-chipper like the guy used in Fargo?

 

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Yeah, it’s kind of creepy. But on the other hand, is it that much different than having our remains turned to ash? Or for that matter,  the natural decomposition of all once living organisms. 
 

As G. Gordon Liddy once said, “We all end up as worm food” this just makes the process a bit quicker. 

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Posted (edited)

Just came back from a funeral yesterday. Cousin's mother in law 99. Those ceremonies are morbid, pretty much like weddings. One day they'll be watching them on Nat Geo, like we watch primitive tribes in South America. They didn't bury her, she's got her own apartment alongside her husband. I told them I'd a justice of the peace funeral, pop me in the oven, maybe I'll make a nice 3D box for the ashes. Strippers for the men and women, otherwise no one will make the drive to see me off.

 

 

Waste of space if you ask me, cemeteries that is. Compost is a nice alternative. If you died in the woods you'd be food for something, same in the ocean. I see nothing wrong with a nice controlled rot. Be like dying in the wild, except this way someone can actually benefit from your death, especially if you die broke.

 

 

Edited by Shaky

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1 hour ago, oax said:

Personally I'm not comfortable turning people into human compost, at best it seems disrespectful and also sets a gruesome precedent for the future. 

+1

 

1 hour ago, oax said:

Do you think this is a good thing or just another ridiculous edict from the greens?

ridiculous.  next will be mass burials in a giant hole, being pushed in with a payloader. 

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So is it wrong of me to ask me to be cremated and spread on the ocean…

 

bite me… literally… through a long ass natural process of the food chain etc…

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Arguments being presented to justify this process are:

 

Estimates claim the cremation process releases an average of 534.6 pounds of carbon dioxide into the air per body, which translates to about 360,000 metric tons emitted in the U.S. each year.  

 

Chemicals used to embalm bodies for burial leach an estimated 5.3 million gallons of fluids like formaldehyde, methanol and ethanol into the ground each year.  

 

Caskets and burial vaults are considered resource-intensive requiring 30 million board feet of wood and nearly 2 million tons of concrete, steel and other materials per year.  

 

Cemeteries are becoming over crowded and occupy valuable land that urbanists feel would be better used to house our ever growing population.

 

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