baldadonis2002

Look at This... Ridiculously Overpriced Seafood

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26 posts in this topic

On 9/20/2022 at 0:59 PM, baldadonis2002 said:

BUSTED!!!

 

About 15-20 micro seabass 

 

FWIW ...perfect English was spoken and they were in a Porsche SUV 

 

Not sure what the DEC fine structure is per fish and let's assume there was a few missing Marine Registrations... all in all, that is some hella expensive seafood.

DEC Busted.jpg

You see this all the time, usually speaking another language amongst themselves on the jetty and filling a community bucket or cooler. I always mention in a friendly manner that there are size and catch limits and get smiles of reassurance. Every once in a while, I find dead short bass in the rocks as well. Glad these people got caught.

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15 hours ago, Ftyer said:

I don’t see why they don’t increase the penalties of this sort of thing nationwide.
 

If you can get caught up and thrown in jail for the any amount of years for having too much grass on you, you shouldn’t be able pay a fine and walk free for these sorts of violations. Even more so when you  consider that poaching generally happens on public land, which we all fund by paying taxes—it’s a bit of a stretch, but these sorts of things are sort of the same as robbing from the general public. 

The answer is very simple--regardless of the potential penalties, they are meaningless if the courts won't enforce them.  And the majority of state judges seem unwilling to impose significant penalties for resource violations.  Overworked prosecutors arso seem very willing to offer very generous plea bargains that make the penalties effectively meaningless.

 

Severe penalties that courts won't enforce can do more harm than good.  Connecticut learned that about a year ago, when all of its striped bsss violations were misdemeanors, requiring a complicated court process where the accused had to first appear to plead (usually after trying to work things out with the state's attorney), then a formal pre-trial conference, then the potential for a jury trial.  Each of those steps required the state's attorney's involvement, as did the plea bargaining that went on in the meantime.  So the state;s attoreys, who were also handling everying trom misdemeanor assaults, larcenties and drug crimes through felony arraignments, ended up entering nolles and letting the accused poachers walk.  By reducing the penalty to a violation, with a mail-in fine, like minor traffic violations, far more cases would be brought to conclusion, and some penalty applied.

 

Because of how courts operate, more severe penalties don't always work the way you might expect.

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23 hours ago, Richizzzle said:

What do you even do with a 4 inch seabass? It can't have any meat on it. I will never understand these people.

Fry them whole in hot oil, the same way that they'd cook a bucket of killies.

 

And no, that's not sarcasm.  It's a sad fact.

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15 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

deserves it for wearing those gloves....

and having an orange bucket !!! True googans only use a white one LOL!!!

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 Id bet less than 5% of the population fishes on a somewhat regular basis. Sadly the other 95% dont care. If your neighbors car was broken into, do you care more about that or the guy keeping small fish. Unfortunately the justice system aligns with that ideology also. Southampton has been going after the crabbers hard but not cause of the crabs but because they are trampling through mega estates to get to good crabbing areas. Supposedly the tresspassing violation sticks more than the crabbing.

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1 hour ago, CWitek said:

Fry them whole in hot oil, the same way that they'd cook a bucket of killies.

 

And no, that's not sarcasm.  It's a sad fact.

 

Spot on Charles... as I am out on disability, I walk these piers daily in the afternoon for exercise and it is the same people everyday, netting buckets of spearing\killies and happily proclaiming they eat them.

 

Initially I assumed they were selling bait on the side, until I asked.

 

It is a seemingly unlimited, seemingly unregulated protein source for the somewhat ignorant  ... thereby making it quite sad.

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13 mins ago, baldadonis2002 said:

 

Spot on Charles... as I am out on disability, I walk these piers daily in the afternoon for exercise and it is the same people everyday, netting buckets of spearing\killies and happily proclaiming they eat them.

 

Initially I assumed they were selling bait on the side, until I asked.

 

It is a seemingly unlimited, seemingly unregulated protein source for the somewhat ignorant  ... thereby making it quite sad.

And to be fair, a lot of the first-generation folks come from places where protein is so hard to come by that they ate anything they could get back in the old country.  A lot of Asia is so unregulated that their fisheries are effectively gone.  A couple of years ago, Jeremy Wade did a series where he visited troubled rivers throughout the world.  One was the Yangtze, where he spoke with fishermen along the bank.  They were generally catching nothing, and when they got anything, it was the size of a big medium-sized spearing.  To folks from that background, our local fisheries, even in their current state, seem unbelievably rich.  They have a hard time understanding why they can't take their catch home, even thoughn they usually know that it's illegal.

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2 hours ago, CWitek said:

The answer is very simple--regardless of the potential penalties, they are meaningless if the courts won't enforce them.  And the majority of state judges seem unwilling to impose significant penalties for resource violations.  Overworked prosecutors arso seem very willing to offer very generous plea bargains that make the penalties effectively meaningless.

 

Severe penalties that courts won't enforce can do more harm than good.  Connecticut learned that about a year ago, when all of its striped bsss violations were misdemeanors, requiring a complicated court process where the accused had to first appear to plead (usually after trying to work things out with the state's attorney), then a formal pre-trial conference, then the potential for a jury trial.  Each of those steps required the state's attorney's involvement, as did the plea bargaining that went on in the meantime.  So the state;s attoreys, who were also handling everying trom misdemeanor assaults, larcenties and drug crimes through felony arraignments, ended up entering nolles and letting the accused poachers walk.  By reducing the penalty to a violation, with a mail-in fine, like minor traffic violations, far more cases would be brought to conclusion, and some penalty applied.

 

Because of how courts operate, more severe penalties don't always work the way you might expect.

Very logical reasoning and I appreciate your info here. Thank you. 

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21 hours ago, dc1874 said:

This is why I stopped going to the Captree Piers. The Flushing express would show up and they would each have 2-3 rods... hogging the entire area. Keeping EVERYTHING..Freakin savages....

 

Not only to the Captree.

Everywhere on the island.

Same scenery, two crab traps and 4 bait rods.

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Also

To be fair

It is not only Flushing Express

Corona Express is very present, too

And there is a our typical bucket brigade.

 

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