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kitchen GFI wont reset

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was making and the rice cooked turned off and the GFI popped, tried to reset, no dice, unplugged everything and tried to reset, nope, installed a new gfi outlet and still pops back out immediately

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Was about to hit it with the multimeter and low and behold, it reset. My guess is moisture short

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Posted (edited)

just replace the gfci plug...

i just replaced a GFCI. I can tell you they can fail from age or other issues its an electro mechanical device that can degrade. I worked with the primary inventor (i'm old) who worked for UC at the time .... some may remember the add they used introducing them

 

Edited by mybosox3

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16 hours ago, ferret said:

Was about to hit it with the multimeter and low and behold, it reset. My guess is moisture short

If you flipped off the breaker to replace the gfi then tried to reset before restoring power the gfi won't reset. Also if that gfi shares outlets down stream are you sure no one turned off or removed something with a possible short from the line?

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6 hours ago, SB59 said:

If you flipped off the breaker to replace the gfi then tried to reset before restoring power the gfi won't reset. Also if that gfi shares outlets down stream are you sure no one turned off or removed something with a possible short from the line?

I think that's what happened, but still concerned about the initial trip

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Finding the source, if not the moisture, can be difficult. It only takes 5 milliamps to trip a gfi. New appliances have proven problematic for GFI circuits. Good or bad, code requires them for certain appliances.  

 

Check the circuit by removing all fixtures and appliances on the circuit. Plug each one in and run until you find the culprit. 

 

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On 8/28/2022 at 11:28 PM, Scallywag said:

Finding the source, if not the moisture, can be difficult. It only takes 5 milliamps to trip a gfi. New appliances have proven problematic for GFI circuits. Good or bad, code requires them for certain appliances.  

 

Check the circuit by removing all fixtures and appliances on the circuit. Plug each one in and run until you find the culprit. 

 

which is why most new builds require gfi breaker and or dual function af/gf

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On 8/28/2022 at 11:52 AM, mybosox3 said:

just replace the gfci plug...

i just replaced a GFCI. I can tell you they can fail from age or other issues its an electro mechanical device that can degrade. I worked with the primary inventor (i'm old) who worked for UC at the time .... some may remember the add they used introducing them

 

haha!  you worked with the inventor .did he call it a plug also ?      

little lesson. just like man and lady.  man plugs the ladies receptacle.

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6 hours ago, coolhandfluke said:

which is why most new builds require gfi breaker and or dual function af/gf

My buddy is a sparky. He and I discuss this all the time. As an appliance tech, they drive me nuts. He doesn't necessarily agree they should be as wildly used as they are but we both see the safety factor. 

 

I wouldn't have an issue is modern appliances ran "cleaner". I suspect the electronics but can't say 100%. 

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9 hours ago, Scallywag said:

My buddy is a sparky. He and I discuss this all the time. As an appliance tech, they drive me nuts. He doesn't necessarily agree they should be as wildly used as they are but we both see the safety factor. 

 

I wouldn't have an issue is modern appliances ran "cleaner". I suspect the electronics but can't say 100%. 

yep. we just had this discussion at work yesterday.  whats wrong with having your pool pump plugged into an outside standard receptacle via an extension cord.

everyone did it until the electrical inspectors came into play.    we all did it and we are all still here.

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Posted (edited)

Its been a while but it used to be if you had a single piece of equipment like a sump pump or washing machine you could use  a single outlet receptacle device that was non gfci. The thinking behind it was that the outlet would never be used for anything else. I don't know if this is still the case and it won't work for a kitchen outlet.

 

If you don't know when it was installed replace it.

 

Also, don't assume that the brand new one is good out of the box. I bet an outlet on the circuit has the hot and neutral reversed. 

Edited by jmlandru

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2 hours ago, coolhandfluke said:

yep. we just had this discussion at work yesterday.  whats wrong with having your pool pump plugged into an outside standard receptacle via an extension cord.

everyone did it until the electrical inspectors came into play.    we all did it and we are all still here.

Code enforcement and lawyers. 

 

It takes ONE scenario of someone getting zapped, somewhere and then it's changed forever. 

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1 hour ago, Scallywag said:

Code enforcement and lawyers. 

 

It takes ONE scenario of someone getting zapped, somewhere and then it's changed forever. 

Search pool and dock electric shock and you’ll see there a lot of cases of shocks and deaths attributed to improper or defective wiring. It is unfortunately way too common as exterior circuits are exposed to extreme weather conditions, flooded conduits, insulation breaks down and you can have intermittent grounds that won’t trip a breaker but can kill your when you grab the pool ladder or dock platform. 
Exterior and bathrooms make plenty of sense to protect with gfci breakers or receptacles. I think the kitchen requirements are overboard but for really wet locations it’s a no brainer 

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3 hours ago, Finneus said:

Search pool and dock electric shock and you’ll see there a lot of cases of shocks and deaths attributed to improper or defective wiring. It is unfortunately way too common as exterior circuits are exposed to extreme weather conditions, flooded conduits, insulation breaks down and you can have intermittent grounds that won’t trip a breaker but can kill your when you grab the pool ladder or dock platform. 
Exterior and bathrooms make plenty of sense to protect with gfci breakers or receptacles. I think the kitchen requirements are overboard but for really wet locations it’s a no brainer 

100% agree. 

 

I'm pretty familiar with electrical code. I also know and understand bonding, which is a requirement for pools. 

 

There was a story a few years back here in Jersey where a 16 year old girl was electrocuted while exiting a lagoon. A boat lift shorted to ground and killed her while climbing out of the lagoon on an aluminum ladder. I believe the lift was at a neighbor's house. 

 

I have been shocked by faulty heaters in my fish tank. Oddly enough, there's no ground probe on them. 

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