Blazer1185

Beginner surf fly fishing

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Looking to get started in surf fly fishing looking for tips. Is this a good kit for a total beginner 
Redington Coastal Coldwater 990-4 Field Kit Combo 

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You'll need to practice casting and  get a stripping basket, but that combo looks good for the money . The reel and the line are  worth 200 and change and are decent quality. Read as much as you can about the subject and watch some casting videos. Have fun!

 

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Blaze,

 

To catch a fish it is fundamental that we can get our fly to it. All the knowledge and field craft is useless if we can’t do that.

So my best tip is get your cast sorted.

 

Mike

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Only way to get a better deal than that outfit would be to buy a used rod, reel and line from someone who has already dialed it in (matched the line to the rod, and also chosen correct size of reel).   Normally I would avoid a pre-packaged outfit, but that one looks fairly well made for the price...and is going to be balanced (b/c the factory designed it so).

 

Beyond that, I second (third) what's been said above....If you get lessons and practice hard, you will be able to make almost any rod, reel, line combo work for you well enough to get a cast out there to a fishable distance.  The key is to not groove the wrong behaviors from the get go.

 

The 9wt is an o.k. rod weight to learn on for general salt use.  The rod in question is probably a bit heavier in hand than will suit you in the longer term if you get really into the sport.  That would be my only concern.  But you're not out a ton of cash to start out with that outfit.

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@Blazer1185 Couple things to think about as you get started.  
 

1. Casting - very important to build those good habits early. A good guide or a casting instructor can go a long way. 
 

2. Line selection - you will be amazed how much of a difference the right line will

make. The biggest things to start thinking about are taper (shape of the line), sink rate, and temperature rating. I recommend one of the following two. There are some “Striper” lines out there which are good for smaller flies and moderate wind. Then some aggressive taper lines that are good for larger flies or/and more wind. (Rio - outbound short) . But don’t buy any tropical lines for fishing up in the NE.  
 

3. Fly Patterns - you don’t need to get crazy with flies. A few patterns are good to start.  You want a couple small, medium, and large(er) flies. Small: clouser minnow, Bonito bunny, surf candy. Medium: lefty deceiver, small flat wing, gurgler. Large: hollow deceiver, striper dragon, large flat wing, big popper. 
 

4. Location - In the begging, it can be frustrating when you feel like you just can’t reach the fish. Start In the spots that get you closest to the fish. Jetties can be great spots to get within easy casting distance for beginners. 
 

5. Gear - Rod, reel, line, flies, couple spools of 15,20,25 lb leader, and a stripping basket. These are all essential for surf fishing. I prefer the hard plastic baskets. Linekurve makes a good one.  

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The hardest part is not getting discouraged when the wind and waves are the ones in control. With time and practice you’ll have success. My only piece of advice is do not turn your back on the surf.

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Where are going to hit the surf? Do you fish the surf now?

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34 mins ago, theshadow said:

Where are going to hit the surf? Do you fish the surf now?

I fish the south shore of Long Island and montauk alot now

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I was/am in your shoes being only my second season.

 

If you know how to find fish the transition will be easy. I would say fighting fish is what is really different and far more physically taxing and fun if you horse fish in. Such a thrill and a way to honor the power of these fish.  Sometimes I just laugh when they pull so hard, i have to lunge forward.  Slot bass can be like taming beasts.  With spinning I usually just get their heads up and plane them on top.  Really remarkably different experience.

 

This thread may have some helpful notes.

 

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Thanks for the advice i was able to get a lightly used douglas lrs 9’ 9wt with a redington grande with rio coastal quickshooter xp

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I don’t know your skill level, but I wish I listened to the gents here. I should have taken a few casting lessons. Mark, Killie and Cary were very helpful with giving me great info to get me going 6 months ago when I started. Great info here and the folks in this forum are very helpful. Enjoy

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1 hour ago, Blazer1185 said:

Thanks for the advice i was able to get a lightly used douglas lrs 9’ 9wt with a redington grande with rio coastal quickshooter xp

Solid setup to get going. That line is a good option for tossing large streamer patterns. Also good for a beginner because the heavy aggressive taper gives a lot of feedback. Let 30-35 ft of line out and start false casting. You can easily feel when the rod is loaded and ready to cast. Get yourself some simple hollow deceiver patterns and start catching some bass. 

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Hey Blazer.  By no means am I trying to discourage you, but going straight into the surf with a fly rod is challenging to say the least.  The biggest problem I have in the surf is line control or management.  The wash will play havoc with your line as you strip in in, and breaking waves and driving winds will pile up your casts.  It can be very frustrating, even for an experienced hand.  A stripping basket helps, but they have their drawbacks.  I'd recommend getting acquainted with casting, retrieving, mending and managing your line in more benign conditions first, perhaps a back bay or river.  Then take on the surf.  Regardless of how you do it, I wish you best of luck.  A fly rod can be a fantastic tool to fish the beach with.  

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Posted (edited)

Blazer, you might want to consider joining the Atlantic Saltwater Flyrodders in Seaside Park, NJ; a lot of sharpies in the club that are very helpful and forthcoming with their knowledge.

After you get your casting squared away, I strongly recommend teaching yourself to cast with your non-dominant hand.  It's easier to learn than it may sound.  And, for me, it comes in handy, often.  I'm right handed and it  casts stronger than my left, but I'm more accurate with my left than the right. Go figure...  Enjoy, and good luck out there!

Edited by Jettyhound

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I would second the recommendations above to get lessons. Second try some freshwater bass on pond that is sheltered from the wind, or evening dock/estuary spots as the wind tends to lie down a bit in the evening. 
 

Once you can cast 30-40 feet in the wind the wind is your friend in the surf. I’ve caught fish in storms when it was hard to cast 25 feet. The fish were that close. 

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