Richard_the_Aughth

Truth about bleeding your fish

Rate this topic

60 posts in this topic

I'm not going to deny bleeding your fish is probably for the best, but how much better is it really? I was at the fish market and I realized all the fish in the super market is probably never bled, and people still eat it without complaining. When a dragger pulls up a net of fish, is the crew actually bleeding each individual fish? Or are they thrown into a big pile until they can be processed or bought by some fish facility?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1 min ago, bob_G said:

They eat it and don't complain because they don't know any better.   If you were to compare two striper filets, one bled and the other not, you can see the difference to the naked eye.

I've always bled my fish so I wouldn't know. At least the larger ones. I havn't bled tog or fluke

Edited by Richard_the_Aughth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fish in my regular supermarket is kinda oldish, and not very good for the most part.  I have however grabbed a good hunk of king salmon before.  Outside of that it's just mehhh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bob_G said:

They eat it and don't complain because they don't know any better.   If you were to compare two striper filets, one bled and the other not, you can see the difference to the naked eye.

You can absolutely see the difference bled vs not bled.

 

Whether or not that makes a difference on the plate - who really knows. But I bleed every single fish that I keep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

is the crew actually bleeding each individual fish

 There's something else  in play here seldom mentioned :: rigormortis. As far as I know, commercial fish is gutted rather soon after landing, then iced, which allows the flesh to go through rigor. The best fish markets ice and hold day boat fish at least a day before cutting to allow rigormortis to run its course. 

 

1 hour ago, bob_G said:

If you were to compare two striper filets, one bled and the other not, you can see the difference to the naked eye.

Having read enough of your posts to know you cook well. Maybe you'll find yourself in the situation  where you can ice and hold 'today's' fish, catch again tomorrow, cut & cook both fish tomorrow, and compare the textural difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The larger the fish, the more critical it is to bleed the fish.  I'll keep an 18.25" fish for the table and let the larger fish go.  I want 'em to make babies.  If you mortally wound a larger fish, then by all means bleed it.  I've always felt that larger stripers taste pretty much like smaller stripers except for the texture and didn't understand why some fishermen claim that larger fish taste like crap.  Then it dawned on me that they probably weren't bleeding their larger fish so I did a taste test with bled vs unbled fish.  Small 18-19" fish and 10-12 lb fish.  Haven't kept a fish over 20 lb in a long, long time.  There was a distinct difference in the color of the fillets.  Very little difference in the flavor of the small fish, but with the larger fish, the difference was very pronounced.  The bled larger fish tasted pretty much like the smaller fish but coarser texture.

 

I always carry a serrated Spyderco for gillin' fish.  Heck, I even bleed surf perch.  With serrated salt series knives you don't even have to wipe off the blade.  Takes all of 5 seconds.

Edited by bass11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Drew C. said:

You can absolutely see the difference bled vs not bled.

 

Whether or not that makes a difference on the plate - who really knows. But I bleed every single fish that I keep.

Plus u can't measure palate preference either.  

 

When I cut meat, everything ever taught to us was that the deep cherry red meat was crap. But then you work with the customer for awhile and some people preferred it!  Crazy. But that's how it goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

I'm not going to deny bleeding your fish is probably for the best, but how much better is it really? I was at the fish market and I realized all the fish in the super market is probably never bled, and people still eat it without complaining. When a dragger pulls up a net of fish, is the crew actually bleeding each individual fish? Or are they thrown into a big pile until they can be processed or bought by some fish facility?

You are talking about people that pay $26.99 /lb for a freaking striped bass filet.... you think they know what fresh fish is? 

 

There is much difference for like Tog and not bled them. I use to not know better and sorta hate the fishy taste they have. But that changed when I learn the bleeding technique and ice them, they taste much better with out that 'smell'. 

Edited by foxfai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Richard_the_Aughth said:

I'm not going to deny bleeding your fish is probably for the best, but how much better is it really? I was at the fish market

A lot of bluefish filets I see at supermarkets are nasty looking compare to my bluefish filets which are from fish that are bled immediately when landed then quickly thrown on ice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 mins ago, zak-striper said:

A lot of bluefish filets I see at supermarkets are nasty looking compare to my bluefish filets which are from fish that are bled immediately when landed then quickly thrown on ice.

Your fish are among the best I've ever seen. You take impeccable care of them, begining with bleeding and ice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you gut a non bled fish before fileting and scrape out the bloodline the filets won't soak up any blood when you fillet the fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

If you bleed and ice/brine them correctly, the filets come out almost perfect, white, not mushy gray, and most people who don't complain simply don't know better.

 

Bled out in a 5 gallon bucket as soon as they hit the deck, then thrown into ocean water with 2 or 3 busted up 5 gallon blocks of ice.  No need to gut them.

 

Of course, if you're going bread it, fry it, and dip in cocktail sauce, it won't matter anyway.

 

20220520_165218.jpg.9f6e67b5b28a9dfc9a56592a5d517960.jpg

 

62fdb39200c5a_SeaBass5-16-21.jpg.fa0a5eeb0968791a81f1cd7b5bb5830a.jpg

 

Edited by JoeyZac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still trying to understand rigor mortis. I guess it's best to fillet the fish before it happens. It could start within 2 hours from what I'm reading. I definitely experienced it with trout right after an outing.

 

If it started to stiffen you have to wait for a couple of days. I think filleting the fish asap is the best way, not always possible of course. I tried Ikejime method, can't say it made a huge difference that time. I definitely need more practice. I think I saw a processing video where they just chop the spine near the tail and behind the head to sever the nerves, than gut the fish. It kind of makes sense and is pretty quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I've started bleeding EVERYTHING, not a big deal when you use the simple, rip the gills out technique.  Then they go head down into the "Bleed Bucket", a 5 gallon bucked with seawater so they still are "breathing", making sure they get bled out.

 

Once bled out they go into an old 96 qt Igloo with 2 old OJ bottles filled with water and frozen, and sea water where they sit for at least 3 hrs before cutting.  While being cut they only see sea water washes, AAMOF my fillets never see fresh water from ocean to table, one of the perks for living on the water...

 

If I'm doing sushi or sashimi, as much of the blood lines get cut out.  Here's what a nice fresh striped bass fillet looks like prepared this way for a delicious sashimi dinner.  Quite a bit difference what you see in the seafood stores...

 

0?ui=2&ik=ad51930c6b&attid=0.1.1&permmsgid=msg-f:1741414195802469709&th=182abefc13a0f54d&view=fimg&fur=ip&sz=s0-l75-ft&attbid=ANGjdJ8zCK_iNQvUT7Yd5CmvnrsNZJFir2aD2xi6nNC8b04d8mjDw8T4DIm74NthzitLPt-XNTE2gHMnezNPSJX79UsmhOL_4nH8Bnq1fLehBhKO-3R-mMNP5JEatt8&disp=emb

Edited by Roccus7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.