Roccus7

Your new Steiger won't be coming anytime soon!!

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Posted (edited)

If anyone is waiting on delivery of a new Steiger, it may be a very long time.  Fire in their LI plant today.

 

62f7b4eca4eca_steigerfire.jpg.f37d6eea9737a2a2912971f3f77f262d.jpg

Edited by Roccus7

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As news comes in, it seems that it was limited to a barn where the glass stringers are made...

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I drove by that last week and there were no cars parked and just 2 boats stored out front.  there were a couple of molds stacked away from the building.

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, 27conch said:

How do manufacturing places like this not have a safety sprinkler system in place??

They do…..but it’s useless with these kinds of materials. They go right up…….Ever see a newer boat burn on the water? Just disappears in minutes. 

Edited by aae0130

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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, 27conch said:

How do manufacturing places like this not have a safety sprinkler system in place??

 

1 hour ago, aae0130 said:

They do…..but it’s useless with these kinds of materials. They go right up…….Ever see a newer boat burn on the water? Just disappears in minutes. 

Not every building at every boat plant has automatic sprinklers. 

 

Whether the system is effective or ineffective depends largely on whether it was actually designed to protect the storage and operations in the building... that principle applies to all sprinkler systems.  In a boat plant, the appropriate system design would addressed primarily by NFPA 13 and NFPA 30.

Edited by Slacker

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Posted (edited)

7 mins ago, Slacker said:

 

Not every building at every boat plant has automatic sprinklers. 

 

Whether the system is effective or ineffective depends largely on whether it was actually designed to protect the storage and operations in the building... that principle applies to all sprinkler systems.  In a boat plant, the appropriate system design would addressed primarily by NFPA 13 and NFPA 30.

I think you mentioned being in Compliance training…..or something to that effect…..Do you think the Steiger building was compliant? It still burned down……..it’s being referred to as a barn. Why is that? I would think at the least they would be in metal buildings. .Are older structures (pre spec) grandfathered or do they need to update?

Edited by aae0130

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2 mins ago, aae0130 said:

I think you mentioned being in Compliance training…..or something to that effect…..Do you think the Steiger building was compliant? It still burned down……..it’s being referred to as a barn. Why is that….Are older structures (pre spec) grandfathered or do they need to update?

Whether a building is "compliant" is a complex question that begins with "compliant with what and with whom".

 

While there are various building codes, State and municipal fire codes, fire protection standards, etc. they are not universally adopted or enforced in the US.  Code enforcement varies from good (sorta) in big city/suburban environments to non-existent in more rural areas.

 

Existing structures in most places are "grandfathered".  It is unusual to have a code enforcement official require that a new occupant upgrade a protection system to meet the needs of the new occupancy.  This kind of requirement most frequently comes from the building's insurance carrier... but that requirement doesn't necessarily mean that it gets done - for a bunch of reasons arising out of how commercial insurance carriers consider and process business.

 

In the case of this place, it sounds like this building was a pole-barn (big shed) on the site. At a place like that it would typically have been intended to store old molds, hardware, boat stands, and other stuff that would be rarely if ever used but still worth keeping out of the weather. It wouldn't be unusual to find a building like that to be nonsprinklered.  Now imagine that production has increased and there is a need more floor space... Management says "hey, move that old junk out and move the new operation in"... setting the stage for this kind of event.

 

Think of fire sprinkler systems like fishing rods.  Some are designed for trout, some are designed for tuna.  Pick the right rod for the fish you want to catch and you will not have a problem.  Take a trout rod tuna fishing and the tuna is gonna burn ya.

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10 mins ago, Slacker said:

Whether a building is "compliant" is a complex question that begins with "compliant with what and with whom".

 

While there are various building codes, State and municipal fire codes, fire protection standards, etc. they are not universally adopted or enforced in the US.  Code enforcement varies from good (sorta) in big city/suburban environments to non-existent in more rural areas.

 

Existing structures in most places are "grandfathered".  It is unusual to have a code enforcement official require that a new occupant upgrade a protection system to meet the needs of the new occupancy.  This kind of requirement most frequently comes from the building's insurance carrier... but that requirement doesn't necessarily mean that it gets done - for a bunch of reasons arising out of how commercial insurance carriers consider and process business.

 

In the case of this place, it sounds like this building was a pole-barn (big shed) on the site. At a place like that it would typically have been intended to store old molds, hardware, boat stands, and other stuff that would be rarely if ever used but still worth keeping out of the weather. It wouldn't be unusual to find a building like that to be nonsprinklered.  Now imagine that production has increased and there is a need more floor space... Management says "hey, move that old junk out and move the new operation in"... setting the stage for this kind of event.

 

Think of fire sprinkler systems like fishing rods.  Some are designed for trout, some are designed for tuna.  Pick the right rod for the fish you want to catch and you will not have a problem.  Take a trout rod tuna fishing and the tuna is gonna burn ya.

Thank you…..this was interesting. 

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I lived around the corner for years. Close enough to smell the resin when the wind was blowing in the right direction

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I drove by there last week. Place looked fine. Several boats (5-6) in the front shop by the street looked almost finished. And people were working. 

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