NJTramcar

Anyone add extra tie down inside 4runner, if so, how?

14 posts in this topic

I am interested in adding a dew small D rings to run a bungie to hold items in the back of my 5th gen 4Runner.

 

I've never done this but handy with tools.

 

Has anyone did this and liked how it turned out?  How did you do it?

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You could either use the existing screws holding the plastic trim pieces on or remove the trim and through bolt the D rings to it. 

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I was thinking that but my covers are clipped, not screwed on.  Ugh.

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Remove the covers ( good luck not breaking clips ). See what frame structure is like underneath. Pick a spot, determine what length self tapping screw you need, pre drill, screw and done.

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Posted (edited)

I own a 2016 $Runner Trail edition - not clear on what you want to do - are you looking to stretch bungees across the floor of the rear deck or between the side panels at the back? Which model 4Runner do you have? does it have the sliding rear deck?  To remove the panels, you need a "panel removal tool kit" I bought the Kohree 32 piece panel removal tool kit - use it all the time, but my 4Runner is extensively modified as an Overlander.

 

My own approach to this was to use molle panels - this is a whole different discussion.

 

This write up is not mine (disclaimer) but is copied from the Toyota 4Runner,org forum:

 

As I stated earlier - many thanks to all who helped me see the error of my ways. Below is a recap of what I learned and my install.

1. Don't use toggle bolts. You'll need to make a very large hole in the side panel and the backside of those panels have a variety of things behind them - from metal frame to ridges of plastic to fasteners, etc. Thankfully other uses guided me away from toggle bolts.

2. Do buy a trim removal tool kit - It's very good use of $10.

3. What's behind panels and their backside structure varies from one side of the vehicle to the other. Pull both before you determine where you want your holes so you can have even/symmetrical placement.

So - here's what I ended up with - and am very happy:

I utilized this trim kit:
(cannot post link)

I utilized these tie downs - The D-ring area is about an inch, they are solid, and importantly - the D-Ring doesn't rattle.

(cannot post link)
While the kit comes with screws, I wanted something a bit longer since I needed a fender washer, and a lock washer, in addition to the nut. I picked up some 1/4" diameter machine screws in both 1" and .75" lengths. I ended up using the 1" length due to the structure on the back side of the panel - you'll see that below in one of the pics.

This was my first time taking off panels but it's pretty simple. Insert tool, make a gap, and wiggle your tool until you hear a clip pop open. I should state, I didn't TECHNICALLY take off any panels, i just unfastened enough clips and screws to get the access I needed. I unscrewed the screw inside of the cargo cover indentation. Just pop off the cover and it's a phillips. I unfastened the 3-4 clips on the top of the panel and then I removed the plastic "T" tie down right near the tailgate. Just a quarter turn and it pops out. Again, there is a phillips screw underneath.

Once I had the top of the panel loose I pulled it back to see what was behind it (a small Maglite comes in handy here). I had three considerations for where to place the tie downs/drill the hole:

1. Where would the tie down be convenient. For me, I wanted it somewhat it in the middle of the cargo area (front to back), and ideally wanted something to be able to sit in the wheel well tray and also be tied down.
2. What is behind the panel in that location. The fender washer I chose was big to maximize surface area and thus strength of the tie down. This, however, makes install in a couple spots tricky given where metal or clips are located.
3. I wanted to leverage the structure on the back of the panel for strength -- although I didn't originally anticipate this being a need. You'll see from the pics I chose a spot where the fender washer would spread over three "ridges" (left, right, and bottom).

Once i picked a spot, the question was how to replicate the location on both sides so it was symmetrical. I knew I wanted to use masking tape over the drilling area so I didn't damage the finish of the panel, so I just used a couple pieces as my measuring guide. The vertical piece of tape in the pic is aligned with the ridge on the back of the panel. I then placed the fender washer over the tape so one side hit the edge of the masking tape (and the ridge), and the bottom edge of the tape (and the bottom ridge). This ensured I hit all three ridges and had maximum support. I did use a measuring tape just to validate.

Note: Drilling into a panel for the first time will raise your heart rate and make you sweat!

Once I had the hole drilled I added the washer, the lock washer and the nut. On the side with the jack, the panel comes out further and you can easily use your fingers to tighten. On the side with the cubbie, I had to use a needle nose pliers to hold the nut. Be careful not to drop the needle nose or you'll be taking out a LOT more clips to go find it.

With the nut tightened and being satisfied with everything I reassembled. I started with the two screws on either end and worked my way to the middle. The clips pop back in easily.
 

 

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Edited by FlatWing
Please don't posts to commercials sites or forums - thanks.

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I built drawers with a flat wooden top that has tie downs on top and tie downs on the sides of the drawers. I only use them to fasten drawers down to the 4 existing tie downs because the drawers hold most of my stuff. Top tie downs hold a cooler slider I built and another slider for a large milk crate full of plugs (both removable).

 

Flat top can double as a changing table when with the family (baby)

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4 hours ago, Blank Disc said:

I built drawers with a flat wooden top that has tie downs on top and tie downs on the sides of the drawers. I only use them to fasten drawers down to the 4 existing tie downs because the drawers hold most of my stuff. Top tie downs hold a cooler slider I built and another slider for a large milk crate full of plugs (both removable).

 

Flat top can double as a changing table when with the family (baby)

Would you post pics?

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16 hours ago, FlatWing said:

I own a 2016 $Runner Trail edition - not clear on what you want to do - are you looking to stretch bungees across the floor of the rear deck or between the side panels at the back? Which model 4Runner do you have? does it have the sliding rear deck?  To remove the panels, you need a "panel removal tool kit" I bought the Kohree 32 piece panel removal tool kit - use it all the time, but my 4Runner is extensively modified as an Overlander.

 

My own approach to this was to use molle panels - this is a whole different discussion.

 

This write up is not mine (disclaimer) but is copied from the Toyota 4Runner,org forum:

 

As I stated earlier - many thanks to all who helped me see the error of my ways. Below is a recap of what I learned and my install.

1. Don't use toggle bolts. You'll need to make a very large hole in the side panel and the backside of those panels have a variety of things behind them - from metal frame to ridges of plastic to fasteners, etc. Thankfully other uses guided me away from toggle bolts.

2. Do buy a trim removal tool kit - It's very good use of $10.

3. What's behind panels and their backside structure varies from one side of the vehicle to the other. Pull both before you determine where you want your holes so you can have even/symmetrical placement.

So - here's what I ended up with - and am very happy:

I utilized this trim kit:
(cannot post link)

I utilized these tie downs - The D-ring area is about an inch, they are solid, and importantly - the D-Ring doesn't rattle.

(cannot post link)
While the kit comes with screws, I wanted something a bit longer since I needed a fender washer, and a lock washer, in addition to the nut. I picked up some 1/4" diameter machine screws in both 1" and .75" lengths. I ended up using the 1" length due to the structure on the back side of the panel - you'll see that below in one of the pics.

This was my first time taking off panels but it's pretty simple. Insert tool, make a gap, and wiggle your tool until you hear a clip pop open. I should state, I didn't TECHNICALLY take off any panels, i just unfastened enough clips and screws to get the access I needed. I unscrewed the screw inside of the cargo cover indentation. Just pop off the cover and it's a phillips. I unfastened the 3-4 clips on the top of the panel and then I removed the plastic "T" tie down right near the tailgate. Just a quarter turn and it pops out. Again, there is a phillips screw underneath.

Once I had the top of the panel loose I pulled it back to see what was behind it (a small Maglite comes in handy here). I had three considerations for where to place the tie downs/drill the hole:

1. Where would the tie down be convenient. For me, I wanted it somewhat it in the middle of the cargo area (front to back), and ideally wanted something to be able to sit in the wheel well tray and also be tied down.
2. What is behind the panel in that location. The fender washer I chose was big to maximize surface area and thus strength of the tie down. This, however, makes install in a couple spots tricky given where metal or clips are located.
3. I wanted to leverage the structure on the back of the panel for strength -- although I didn't originally anticipate this being a need. You'll see from the pics I chose a spot where the fender washer would spread over three "ridges" (left, right, and bottom).

Once i picked a spot, the question was how to replicate the location on both sides so it was symmetrical. I knew I wanted to use masking tape over the drilling area so I didn't damage the finish of the panel, so I just used a couple pieces as my measuring guide. The vertical piece of tape in the pic is aligned with the ridge on the back of the panel. I then placed the fender washer over the tape so one side hit the edge of the masking tape (and the ridge), and the bottom edge of the tape (and the bottom ridge). This ensured I hit all three ridges and had maximum support. I did use a measuring tape just to validate.

Note: Drilling into a panel for the first time will raise your heart rate and make you sweat!

Once I had the hole drilled I added the washer, the lock washer and the nut. On the side with the jack, the panel comes out further and you can easily use your fingers to tighten. On the side with the cubbie, I had to use a needle nose pliers to hold the nut. Be careful not to drop the needle nose or you'll be taking out a LOT more clips to go find it.

With the nut tightened and being satisfied with everything I reassembled. I started with the two screws on either end and worked my way to the middle. The clips pop back in easily.
 

 

*

IMG_2546.jpg

IMG_2549.JPG

IMG_2555.JPG

IMG_2559.JPG

IMG_2562.JPG

IMG_2564.JPG

IMG_2576.JPG

IMG_2577.JPG

Basically the same thing I said but with 10,000 more words. :)

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Have you checked all the baby car seat latch points in the back . Sometimes they are hidden and sometimes depending on vintage you could add some.

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Not in the pics because I had most of my gear inside at the time. Usually on the left side drawer I keep a compressor, jack board and the large milk crate full of plano boxes. on the right side i keep two plastic totes one with plug bags and belt and boots and the other for waders, etc. 

 

I don't have pics of the other slider that goes on top for plug storage because I haven't been using it (unfortunately not fishing as much as I would like to at the moment). 

 

I built this two years ago with basic tools (drill, clamps, hand saw, etc.) when I had lyme and was spending a lot of time at home. 

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NJ

 

There are commercially available drawers - I mostly have used Ironman 4x4 products, but I did not get their drawers because my best friend (whom I suddenly lost just 2 weeks ago) wanted to make one for me - he loved wood working and had a very extensive shop.  He also custom sized mine to allow mounting of my twin ViAir compressors, 2.5 gallon Air Tank. water pump and water filter on the top, while still being able to slide my stock deck out underneath my lower internal rod rack. Not the best picture, but I will take more when I empty the truck out in a few weeks for its annual service.

0616210118.jpg

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