Mallard1100

Saltwater two fly rig setup?

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This may seem like a dumb question but when using a 2 fly setup in saltwater, would it be more beneficial to put the larger fly on the bottom dropper/anchor fly for casting purposes or the smaller fly on the bottom as the dropper? 

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Posted (edited)

One way of multiple flys is done by Steve well.

Two  to three flies show being done by TheFisherman (Steve Coulton)  in his website called   "surrentseams"

 

HT

 

 

AddingWeightWetFlyTeam

Edited by HillTop

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Many years ago, I fished two shrimp flies. Hooked two schoolies. It was a nightmare. Never again.  I used two flies with a dropper off a small swivel  in several situations in the bays off the Pacific. Worked well, but doubles were smaller fish like surf perch and various small sea bass.  The dropper was off the top ring of a sz. 10 swivel and about 4-5" in length, with 18" of tippet below it.  Stiffer fluoro helps. Mostly Clousers in sizes 4 and 6.

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4 hours ago, Mallard1100 said:

This may seem like a dumb question but when using a 2 fly setup in saltwater, would it be more beneficial to put the larger fly on the bottom dropper/anchor fly for casting purposes or the smaller fly on the bottom as the dropper? 

I don't do it very often (maybe during spring schoolie season or if I'm looking for hickory shad)...but I typically use a weighted fly (clouser) up front and have an unweighted fly trailing behind

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And Steve uses his three fly cast as a searching tool to find out more rapidly what the stripers are interested in, not to catch doubles or, worse yet, triples.

 

  

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11 hours ago, Mallard1100 said:

This may seem like a dumb question but when using a 2 fly setup in saltwater, would it be more beneficial to put the larger fly on the bottom dropper/anchor fly for casting purposes or the smaller fly on the bottom as the dropper? 

It's not a dumb question at all. 

 

I typically place the larger/heavier fly on point. I find that makes the rig easier to cast. Slow down your casting stroke and minimize false casts. You might be interested in an article I wrote many years ago on the subject. Do a search for "dropper rigs for stripers" and you'll find it fast.

 

As always, the best way to find out what works for you is to try different setups. The answers usually come pretty quickly. 

 

Hope that helps,

 

Steve Culton

 

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Posted (edited)

I fish the salt for striper with a lead eye Clouser as the bottom fly, and an unweighted crab or shrimp imitation on a twisted dropper loop.*

Granted, I'm on the west coast and the stripers I catch are largely schoolies. The dropper works for the plentiful surf perch. I think of the streamer as a larger fish "chasing" the smaller crab/shrimp.

 

 

Screen Shot 2022-08-13 at 8.08.14 AM.png

Edited by TimS
Welcome, I hate to edit your first post, but we don't allow links here to commercial websites :-)

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On 8/12/2022 at 2:44 PM, Cpalms said:

That looks like an absolute nightmare to fish.

This---  one fly is enough for me

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Seems like I'm in the minority.  I fish a 2 fly setup quite a bit.  Large fly first followed by a smaller clouser hanging off the bend of the first hook with about 20" of leader material.  This clouser usually have bead chain eyes or very small lead eyes.  I do catch multiple fish at times but it is not a big deal.  All my hooks are barbless so often one of the fish come unbuttoned getting them into the boat.  What I find interesting is the small fly seems to out fish the big one.

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Posted (edited)

I've had a lot of experience fishing a two fly rig as, when I began fly fishing for brook trout in the early 1960's, a two-fly-cast and even a three-fly-cast were the norm in Québec. I never really tried a three fly rig but adopted the two fly one and still uses it whenever I fish wet flies for brookies.

 

And casting a multiple fly rig is not by any yardstick a nightmare nor even difficult if you don't go for maximum distance as you can do when fishing only one fly.

 

 

Edited by Suave

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I should have mentioned that casting is not a big deal but you do need to open up your casting stroke.  I mostly fish out of a boat these days so it is somewhat easier to add a little circlular motion to the stroke.

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