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North East blue fin tuna, maybe some good news??

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"New Discovery: Bluefin Tuna Major Spawning Grounds Verified Off Northeast U.S.
The recent find is an important plus for continued good fishing and proper management for the A scientific paper published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences states that the Slope Sea in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (located between the Gulf Stream and the continental shelf of the Northeast United States) is a recently documented major spawning ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna.

The paper states that the Slope Sea was identified as a major spawning ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna because of “larval abundance, growth rates, and particle-tracking simulations.”

The paper notes that bluefin tuna larvae collected in the Slope Sea grew at the same rate as larvae in the Gulf of Mexico, which is a prime bluefin larval habitat area. oversize gamefish."
 

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This is some very cool research by some people I’ve worked with from WHOI, namely Dr. Chrissy Hernandez and Dr. Joel Llopiz. Chrissy presented this work as one of the chapters of her PhD dissertation, and for those of us who might not be able to access the paper (fisheries journals are usually behind paywalls), the basic summary is that larvae were found in similar numbers and with similar growth rates as those in known spawning grounds, with the main difference being that this new spawning location resulted in tuna that were on average larger during the onset of exogenous feeding (eating plankton and no longer relying on the yolk). This could be from cooler waters reducing the metabolism and respiration rates in larvae, which could serve as an advantage in years where food is scarce or environmental stressors are present. Also, more spawning locations means more redundancy in spawning where we might still have decent recruitment even if one spawning ground has a “bad year” for whatever reason. Very cool! Thanks for sharing

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Its refreshing to see posts that actually have content that is based on scientific research and data.   Thanks for posting.

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Don't get your hopes up.

 

US fisheries management sucks across the board regardless of species.

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2 hours ago, GTs_and_Stripers said:

fisheries journals are usually behind paywalls

Sadly, almost all academic journals are behind paywalls, most of which cost thousands upon thousands a year for subscriptions.

 

There are a few good sites that let you get around some (Google Scholar and Sci-Hub to name a few). That said, dissertations are typically held in embargo, though more often than not, the thesis itself is a compilation of already published material. 

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4 mins ago, Camhabib said:

Sadly, almost all academic journals are behind paywalls, most of which cost thousands upon thousands a year for subscriptions.

 

There are a few good sites that let you get around some (Google Scholar and Sci-Hub to name a few). That said, dissertations are typically held in embargo, though more often than not, the thesis itself is a compilation of already published material. 

Totally right, another option if the paper is recent is to email the authors themselves, we’re always happy to send PDFs because we have nothing to lose, the journals are who makes all the money 

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4 mins ago, GTs_and_Stripers said:

Totally right, another option if the paper is recent is to email the authors themselves, we’re always happy to send PDFs because we have nothing to lose, the journals are who makes all the money 

This is another great option. Most NIH / NSF funded researchers are used to sending out material (strains, protocols, etc) anyways and are always happy to increase the views (and citations) for their publication. 

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1 hour ago, Gotcow? said:

Don't get your hopes up.

 

US fisheries management sucks across the board regardless of species.

BFT is managed by ICATT

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4 hours ago, GTs_and_Stripers said:

This is some very cool research by some people I’ve worked with from WHOI, namely Dr. Chrissy Hernandez and Dr. Joel Llopiz. Chrissy presented this work as one of the chapters of her PhD dissertation, and for those of us who might not be able to access the paper (fisheries journals are usually behind paywalls), the basic summary is that larvae were found in similar numbers and with similar growth rates as those in known spawning grounds, with the main difference being that this new spawning location resulted in tuna that were on average larger during the onset of exogenous feeding (eating plankton and no longer relying on the yolk). This could be from cooler waters reducing the metabolism and respiration rates in larvae, which could serve as an advantage in years where food is scarce or environmental stressors are present. Also, more spawning locations means more redundancy in spawning where we might still have decent recruitment even if one spawning ground has a “bad year” for whatever reason. Very cool! Thanks for sharing

:th:

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One of the principal scientists on that subject is Molly Lutcavage, go look her up.

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