Otter

Eighty seven thousand

Rate this topic

394 posts in this topic

of course we all know that there isn't going to be an additional 87k IRS folks...  That's an approximate total of all IRS with some new hires

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eagles Dare said:

 

NJ taxes casual sales no matter how many times an item is resold? 

 

Must be a bitch to hold a yard sale. 

It would if he accepts credit card payment. I would say most only accept cash.   It's going to be fun for used item ebay sellers.  Shoebox upon shoebox of receipt. Buy Nike stock people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Joe said:

of course we all know that there isn't going to be an additional 87k IRS folks...  That's an approximate total of all IRS with some new hires

Wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 mins ago, hobobob said:

It would if he accepts credit card payment. I would say most only accept cash.   It's going to be fun for used item ebay sellers.  Shoebox upon shoebox of receipt. Buy Nike stock people.

 

So it's taxable either way, just no proof of purchase with cash.

 

Kinda like MA residents buying stuff in tax-free NH. You're supposed to pay on all that shite when you file your state tax return. Nobody does. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, mybeach said:

Wrong.

This 87,000 figure comes from a May 2021 Treasury Department assessment of how it would use $80 billion to improve IRS operations. The report said the IRS would add 86,852 new full-time positions. (The plan is not written in stone. The Treasury Department says that in the coming months, it will decide how to allocate the new money.)

But even in the 2021 plan, not all of the hires would be auditors, or work in enforcement. The report said the money would go toward many things, including "hiring new specialized enforcement staff, modernizing antiquated information technology, and investing in meaningful taxpayer service."

Although the agency’s staff would increase, it’s key to note that over half of the IRS workforce is close to retirement. The plan was created with that exodus in mind and aims to hire thousands of people to simply maintain current levels. Today, the IRS has about 80,000 employees.

"The IRS will lose about 50,000 people over the next five or six years," said Natasha Sarin, Treasury’s counselor for tax policy and implementation. "A lot of this hiring is about replacing those people."

Sarin said another factor makes the 87,000 figure less than it appears to be. The agency’s projection of new hires was based on the idea that if things stayed as they were, another decade of business as usual would result in staff cuts. Over the past decade, the IRS has seen its funding drop by 20%. Between 2010 and 2018, the number of enforcement personnel fell by nearly a third. If that trend continued, the IRS would not only be replacing people lost to retirement, but to expected budget cuts.

So, the 87,000 wasn’t exclusively for people on the enforcement side, and it wasn’t all going to boost the overall size of the IRS workforce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, mybeach said:

Wrong.

^^^^^ typical answer from an :airquote:internet intellectual:airquote: 

4 mins ago, Joe said:

This 87,000 figure comes from a May 2021 Treasury Department assessment of how it would use $80 billion to improve IRS operations. The report said the IRS would add 86,852 new full-time positions. (The plan is not written in stone. The Treasury Department says that in the coming months, it will decide how to allocate the new money.)

But even in the 2021 plan, not all of the hires would be auditors, or work in enforcement. The report said the money would go toward many things, including "hiring new specialized enforcement staff, modernizing antiquated information technology, and investing in meaningful taxpayer service."

Although the agency’s staff would increase, it’s key to note that over half of the IRS workforce is close to retirement. The plan was created with that exodus in mind and aims to hire thousands of people to simply maintain current levels. Today, the IRS has about 80,000 employees.

"The IRS will lose about 50,000 people over the next five or six years," said Natasha Sarin, Treasury’s counselor for tax policy and implementation. "A lot of this hiring is about replacing those people."

Sarin said another factor makes the 87,000 figure less than it appears to be. The agency’s projection of new hires was based on the idea that if things stayed as they were, another decade of business as usual would result in staff cuts. Over the past decade, the IRS has seen its funding drop by 20%. Between 2010 and 2018, the number of enforcement personnel fell by nearly a third. If that trend continued, the IRS would not only be replacing people lost to retirement, but to expected budget cuts.

So, the 87,000 wasn’t exclusively for people on the enforcement side, and it wasn’t all going to boost the overall size of the IRS workforce.

^^^^ and the facts when some actually has a clue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 mins ago, Joe said:

This 87,000 figure comes from a May 2021 Treasury Department assessment of how it would use $80 billion to improve IRS operations. The report said the IRS would add 86,852 new full-time positions. (The plan is not written in stone. The Treasury Department says that in the coming months, it will decide how to allocate the new money.)

But even in the 2021 plan, not all of the hires would be auditors, or work in enforcement. The report said the money would go toward many things, including "hiring new specialized enforcement staff, modernizing antiquated information technology, and investing in meaningful taxpayer service."

Although the agency’s staff would increase, it’s key to note that over half of the IRS workforce is close to retirement. The plan was created with that exodus in mind and aims to hire thousands of people to simply maintain current levels. Today, the IRS has about 80,000 employees.

"The IRS will lose about 50,000 people over the next five or six years," said Natasha Sarin, Treasury’s counselor for tax policy and implementation. "A lot of this hiring is about replacing those people."

Sarin said another factor makes the 87,000 figure less than it appears to be. The agency’s projection of new hires was based on the idea that if things stayed as they were, another decade of business as usual would result in staff cuts. Over the past decade, the IRS has seen its funding drop by 20%. Between 2010 and 2018, the number of enforcement personnel fell by nearly a third. If that trend continued, the IRS would not only be replacing people lost to retirement, but to expected budget cuts.

So, the 87,000 wasn’t exclusively for people on the enforcement side, and it wasn’t all going to boost the overall size of the IRS workforce.

And all that ammo they just bought

 

Don't forget the ammo!!  Very important in this line of work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I’ll gladly count myself among the deplorables rather than be lumped in with the likes of you two.

Edited by mybeach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Joe said:

This 87,000 figure comes from a May 2021 Treasury Department assessment of how it would use $80 billion to improve IRS operations. The report said the IRS would add 86,852 new full-time positions. (The plan is not written in stone. The Treasury Department says that in the coming months, it will decide how to allocate the new money.)

But even in the 2021 plan, not all of the hires would be auditors, or work in enforcement. The report said the money would go toward many things, including "hiring new specialized enforcement staff, modernizing antiquated information technology, and investing in meaningful taxpayer service."

Although the agency’s staff would increase, it’s key to note that over half of the IRS workforce is close to retirement. The plan was created with that exodus in mind and aims to hire thousands of people to simply maintain current levels. Today, the IRS has about 80,000 employees.

"The IRS will lose about 50,000 people over the next five or six years," said Natasha Sarin, Treasury’s counselor for tax policy and implementation. "A lot of this hiring is about replacing those people."

Sarin said another factor makes the 87,000 figure less than it appears to be. The agency’s projection of new hires was based on the idea that if things stayed as they were, another decade of business as usual would result in staff cuts. Over the past decade, the IRS has seen its funding drop by 20%. Between 2010 and 2018, the number of enforcement personnel fell by nearly a third. If that trend continued, the IRS would not only be replacing people lost to retirement, but to expected budget cuts.

So, the 87,000 wasn’t exclusively for people on the enforcement side, and it wasn’t all going to boost the overall size of the IRS workforce.

get out of here with those facts. We believe what tucker says.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

That 87,000 estimate represents everything from IT techs to customer service people who answer the phone and help you file your return. Second, it includes attrition. For some perspective, the IRS workforce last year totaled 78,661 full-time equivalent positions—down from 94,709 a decade earlier. And no, the IRS is not doubling its workforce.

That 87,000 estimate thrown around on social media is just a scare tactic where anti-IRS people are getting bent out of shape because the new IRS enforcement fund is about making sure rich people and corporations pay what they owe instead of constantly cheating.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 mins ago, GeoffT said:

rich people and corporations pay what they owe instead of constantly cheating.  

go change your diaper. Ballringer has a few cases if you are low. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 mins ago, GeoffT said:

That 87,000 estimate thrown around on social media is just a scare tactic where anti-IRS people are getting bent out of shape because the new IRS enforcement fund is about making sure rich people and corporations pay what they owe instead of constantly cheating.  

It makes me sad when I see people here spewing that garbage. I am shocked at how dumb some of the PG people are. It's like they can't read or think for themselves they see something on social media and run with it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 mins ago, Terry Mac said:

go change your diaper. Ballringer has a few cases if you are low. 

What color is yours? :kiss:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.