Captain Tuttle

2022 Commercial Striped Bass Fishery Closed

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2022 Commercial Striped Bass Fishery Closed

DMF projects Massachusetts’ 2022 commercial striped bass quota of 735,240 pounds was taken during the last open fishing day on Wednesday, August 3, 2022. Accordingly, the Massachusetts 2022 commercial striped bass fishery will close effective immediately (Closure Notice). Unless otherwise notified, the commercial striped bass fishery will remain closed through Sunday, June 18, 2023. During this closed period, it is unlawful for fishermen to retain, possess, or land striped bass for commercial purposes or in a manner that does not comply with the state’s recreational fishing regulations for the species.

For seafood dealers, during this closed period it is unlawful to purchase or receive striped bass from fishermen. Dealers may continue to possess striped bass, obtain striped bass from dealers, import striped bass from dealers operating in another state, and sell lawfully possessed striped bass. All striped bass in the possession of dealers must comply with the commercial striped bass tagging requirements. Dealers are also reminded that the Division of Marine Fisheries will be providing them with a written request to return all unused 2022 Striped Bass ID Tags and submit a Tag Accounting Report. If a dealer cannot account for an unused tag, they must provide this information in the Tag Accounting Report. Failure to return or account for unused tags may result in the dealer being unable to participate as a primary buyer of striped bass in future years.

 

Commercial fishermen are required to submit monthly trip-level reports by the fifteenth of the following month, even if their permit is not fished. Reports may be submitted electronically via a SAFIS eTrips account, whereas paper forms should be sent to DMF Statistics Project, 30 Emerson Avenue, Gloucester, MA 01930. Failure to submit these reports for all months of the year in a timely manner may result in the non-renewal of a commercial permit and its endorsements in 2023. Blank forms and instructions were mailed out prior to the beginning of the 2022 fishing season; additional copies can be obtained on the Trip Level Reporting website. Electronic reporting through SAFIS eTRIPS is encouraged.

 

For more information about the management of marine fisheries in Massachusetts, visit our website at www.mass.gov/marinefisheries.

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7 hours ago, FindTheFleet said:

All you rec save the Striper boys should abstain since the comm quota is reached an implied rec quota should be reached. 

And all you wannabee "commercial fisherman"  should go back to your real jobs and stop pretending you are the next  coming of Capt. Ahab. 

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1 hour ago, Jeff270 said:

And all you wannabee "commercial fisherman"  should go back to your real jobs and stop pretending you are the next  coming of Capt. Ahab. 

With any luck, maybe there's a commercial tilapia season on the horizon. :naughty:

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9 hours ago, FindTheFleet said:

All you rec save the Striper boys should abstain since the comm quota is reached an implied rec quota should be reached. 

Explain this please

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22 hours ago, FindTheFleet said:

All you rec save the Striper boys should abstain since the comm quota is reached an implied rec quota should be reached. 

 

12 hours ago, Pickerel92 said:

Explain this please

Tongue in cheek He's saying the rec quota should be filled soon too....oh wait there is no rec quota and recs are to blame.  Maybe, maybe not...let's face it we're all to blame. 

What he and many comm guys conveniently omit in the blame game is that they are ALSO rec guys willingly or unwillingly.  Comm guys point to the mortality rate of rec fishing all the time but leave out that same mortality on the short fish they release oh so gently with care (sarcastic laugh).  They also fail to mention that many continue or move on to their charter business which is also classified as rec (boggles my mind). 

 

Me thinks the damage done to the biomass off Plymouth and Boston goes a lot further than the just 735K pounds.  

 

End the take of bass, period.  The comm guys can find new jobs like people do in any other industry during a downturn.  Sucks but that's life.  Of course this assumes they really even NEED bass money to survive and "put food on the table" in the first place.  Rec guys can learn better catch and release practices, charter recs can do the same for their sports, or everyone can take up golf.

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