bassturds

Jumping worm??

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NY fish and wildlife posted an article a few months ago about the invasive jumping worm.  I found this ay work today in Marshfield. I’m going to send this to Ma F&G

B6A45A20-171C-4ACE-B70E-5CFDDC9EAB5F.jpeg

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Yeah they're all over. Under reported because few people have heard of them. They've been here awhile, under the radar.

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1 min ago, mikez2 said:

Yeah they're all over. Under reported because few people have heard of them. They've been here awhile, under the radar.

Yep. 

Have had them in my yard in CT as long as I've lived here (1996)

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2 mins ago, mikez2 said:

Yeah they're all over. Under reported because few people have heard of them. They've been here awhile, under the radar.

Oh wow! I never really payed attention till  Now. Can they do anything? 

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3 mins ago, mikez2 said:

Yeah they're all over. Under reported because few people have heard of them. They've been here awhile, under the radar.

 

Yep.  Its not MA but they've Been in my area of NJ for whats gotta be 20 years.   We call em "glassies".  Glass worms.  They dont jump, they wiggle like crazy.   tough to keep on the hook, they break very easily.  you have to thread them and they juice out loads of crap when they inevitablly break.    Fish still love em.  I do notice a decrease in other types of (better) worms when they are around.  

 

Pretty shocked its a "new" thing.  I thought they were 1960's invasive, not more recent.  

 

 

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I’ve never heard of them. Was just reading about them and the article said that all of the types of earthworms we have in the US are invasive. 

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2 hours ago, z-man said:

I’ve never heard of them. Was just reading about them and the article said that all of the types of earthworms we have in the US are invasive. 

Yep

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My wife's flower beds are full of them.  Apparently brought in, in the pots of flowers and plants that she planted.  They are super active and do thrash around if you pick them up.  Not being a worm fisherman, I wonder how they would do as bait?

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Is it possible that the worms that everyone is describing here are actually red wigglers which are pretty common, and not jumping worms? I've been using red wigglers for bait since I was a kid, and they pretty much do everything I've read here. And they suck as bait. I mean they catch fish, but they wriggle like crazy, break apart easily, hard to get on a hook hard to keep on a hook. Live in flower beds, under mulch, under leaf litter.

 They look different than the above pics. And Jumping worms do have a natural enemy. The Hammerhead worm. Which I'm not sure but preys on all earthworms.

Next on Discovery Channel  WORM WEEK!! Featuring Hammerheads!

22 mins ago, clambellies said:

My wife's flower beds are full of them.  Apparently brought in, in the pots of flowers and plants that she planted.  They are super active and do thrash around if you pick them up.  Not being a worm fisherman, I wonder how they would do as bait?

Just read an article from CT Agriculture Dept. At one point it says they're used as fish

bait, then in another sentence it says fish don't like them.

11 hours ago, z-man said:

I’ve never heard of them. Was just reading about them and the article said that all of the types of earthworms we have in the US are invasive. 

 From Smithsonian- Earthworms are native to the United States, says Melissa McCormick, ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, but the earthworms in some northern parts of the country (including Vermont) aren’t indigenous. Thousands of years ago, glaciers that covered North America and reached as far south as present-day Illinois, Indiana and Ohio wiped out native earthworms. Species from Europe and Asia, most likely introduced unintentionally in ship ballast or the roots of imported plants, have spread throughout North America.

 

Who knew that worms could have so much information written about them?

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11 hours ago, bassturds said:

NY fish and wildlife posted an article a few months ago about the invasive jumping worm.  I found this ay work today in Marshfield. I’m going to send this to Ma F&G

B6A45A20-171C-4ACE-B70E-5CFDDC9EAB5F.jpeg

And this worm looks exactly like a rubber worm I used years ago with great success! It was the Don Iovino Fat Boy in Oxblood color. The dirt looks like the salt!

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11 hours ago, z-man said:

all of the types of earthworms we have in the US are invasive. 

How can that be? The north American continent.. developed worm-free? 
just saying that  I don't understand how that could come to happen

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10 mins ago, Shhh....Now said:

How can that be? The north American continent.. developed worm-free? 
just saying that  I don't understand how that could come to happen

Theory is they were killed off in the ice age, our forests were dramatically different in nature before explorers showed up and dumped their ballasts which released worms that hitched a ride.

 

Without the worms, our leaves were allowed to accumulate into deep dense piles on the forest floor.

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41 mins ago, The TideRunner said:

Is it possible that the worms that everyone is describing here are actually red wigglers which are pretty common, and not jumping worms? I've been using red wigglers for bait since I was a kid, and they pretty much do everything I've read here. And they suck as bait. I mean they catch fish, but they wriggle like crazy, break apart easily, hard to get on a hook hard to keep on a hook. Live in flower beds, under mulch, under leaf litter.

 They look different than the above pics. And Jumping worms do have a natural enemy. The Hammerhead worm. Which I'm not sure but preys on all earthworms.

Next on Discovery Channel  WORM WEEK!! Featuring Hammerheads!

Just read an article from CT Agriculture Dept. At one point it says they're used as fish

bait, then in another sentence it says fish don't like them.

 From Smithsonian- Earthworms are native to the United States, says Melissa McCormick, ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, but the earthworms in some northern parts of the country (including Vermont) aren’t indigenous. Thousands of years ago, glaciers that covered North America and reached as far south as present-day Illinois, Indiana and Ohio wiped out native earthworms. Species from Europe and Asia, most likely introduced unintentionally in ship ballast or the roots of imported plants, have spread throughout North America.

 

Who knew that worms could have so much information written about them?

I personally can definitely tell the difference between red wrigglers and jumpers.

Red wigglers have a distinct look while jumpers at a glance look like old fashioned garden worms.

Fish and other pets like snakes and turtles often spit out and refuse to eat red wrigglers. Some claim they're toxic - enough to cause harm.

I don't even like using them for bait. I used them ice fishing and I swear the trout spit them instantly. 

Jumping worms don't seem toxic like wrigglers. I have used them to feed various critters or fish.

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36 mins ago, adam42 said:

Theory is they were killed off in the ice age,

interesting.. thanks

 

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