FisherPan

Northeasters | How many different fly lines do you REGULARLY use?

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I have two in the truck.  Both 10wt.  One with full sink and the other full float.  If I'm in an inlet, I fish the sink.  In the back bay, I use a floater.

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I can only lug 1 rod if I’m walking the beach. I can fish an intermediate with a gurgler to get it to float or a clouser to sink it more. It’s never perfect but it’s always simple.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

THANK YOU Mike for these pointers.   (Really appreciate everyone's pointers on here)

 

"Just a word of warning casting clousers. A lot of ready mades have very heavy eyes and they are a real pig to cast. You are new and it is a bit different so if the wind is on your casting shoulder and you stay with it more than an even chance you will get a fly to rod collision. This can fracture your rod let alone what it might do to you. Hopefully you will know how to cast with your back to the water when the wind is like this.

If you tye your own flies so much the better. Spirit River do Clouser eyes called Real Eyes and their smallest size in a 5/32 casts pretty well. They are ok with hooks up to a size 1or 1/0.

Again transitioning from fresh to salt it will really help you cast, greatly if you cast from an open stance and watch your back cast all the way. It means your timing will be spot on and that you take all slack out of the system. This is massive. "

Edited by FisherPan

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For me, going ultra light with gear (not under gunned) while fly fishing salt. A stripping basket, waders when its cold. A small soft fly “box”. Sinking line spool. Water. Done. Just a casual walk on the beach. 

 

Oh, it’s important to know your routes to those sandbars at different stages of the tide. I know where i want to be and when.  For me, id rather know fewer locations really well (safety first), than a bunch of areas with so-so knowledge.

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i have a 3 weight ll bean rod i use for trout and an 8 weight orvis silver label pm10 i use for everything else (but admittedly very little saltwater fishing)

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37 mins ago, phishallways said:

For me, id rather know fewer locations really well (safety first), than a bunch of areas with so-so knowledge.

GOLD.

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On 7/26/2022 at 9:19 AM, Ftyer said:

Full sink 99% of the time, 1% a floater when I feel I need to sacrifice my numbers to catch a fish on a popper, and 1% an intermediate when I’m fishing really skinny stuff with cruising fish that I can see. 
 

9 or 10 weight rods are also my go to. Not a real big fan of an 8 weight up here despite owning a couple of them. 

Same here: full sink 99.9% of the time, but carry intermediate head and spare sink tips (I use a shooting head setup)

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On 7/25/2022 at 4:38 PM, FisherPan said:

 

For light to moderate surf, I prefer a floating line with - sometimes - an intermediate or sinking tip.  For heavier surf I go with a full sink. 

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19 mins ago, Mike Oliver said:

Why do so many like a fast sink for the surf. I am puzzled.

 

 

Mike

Hi Mike,

At least in my experience, I find the fast sinking line gets the fly down into the trough faster especially in heavy surf.  

 

Squish

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18 mins ago, Mike Oliver said:

Why do so many like a fast sink for the surf. I am puzzled.

 

 

Mike

Mostly bottom dragging in the wash.In the fall at Race point with the onshore winds and waves.That's the only time I use a full sinker.With quartering winds and waves the shore current will put the line right back on the sand.Walking with the line down the beach keeps it in the trough longer.Also,the receeding wave will pull the line back into the trough if you time it right.Sometimes casting[heaving] the line into the receeding wave parallel to the beach does the same thing.Moving with the line down the beach puts a fly right into the face of a fish.It's work but fun.Just keep an eye on the rouge wave in a set.

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Sinking lines are generally thinner than intermediates and floaters. It makes them easier to cast in the wind. IMHO sometimes just getting the fly out to the fish trumps the type of line you choose. 

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On 7/26/2022 at 4:44 PM, Mike Oliver said:

 

I guess as an old very opinionated git I now understand stuff and what works for me. I ran a different gauntlet. I could not take the fly shop one without losing my sanity. Lol

 

Dont forget the line tray and don’t be afraid of the wind.

 

 

You? Opinionated? Really? (Insert hysterically laughing emoticon here.)

 

Mike, you are spot on about finding what works best for you. 

 

Steve Culton

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Ok thanks for views  on fast sink. I kinda used to subscribe  to the notion that in a head wind a fast sink  was easier to cast. I get that getting a fly out there in tough conditions gives us a chance. But not always ideal.

For these conditions 15 years ago I had a big re think. The first think was the TH surf Rod designed to manage big wind, big surf and powerful sweep. I used to team up with mostly I lines and fast sinks. Not a great move as it turns out.
Then two years ago I thought it was time to become a much better caster. Both single and double hand rods. Casting wise it makes the square root of naff all difference to cast a floater or a fast sink into water that holds fish on a surf beach irrespective of wind.

I can’t apologise for the fact that a 13 foot TH rod used in the same conditions with a floater that are doable for the Single hand rod will be far superior in terms of line control in currents. Then we come to conditions where the 9 foot stick is massively, outgunned and a decent TH can keep us in the game. No contest.

Bass are going to see a fly a lot easier in the water column than one ploughing the bottom attached to a fast sink line.  Bait fish are going to be tumbling in water that is thought to be too much for a floater. The floater is now for me the line to be using in these conditions.  It presents in the most natural way. Bass come  up to take prey and how deep is even a steep surf beach not a lot. A fast sink line is totally at the whim of surf and a fast sweep. A floater not so much. Pure floater or one with a fast sink length of poly leader if that’s needed works well. We have control. Control is everything when it comes to presentation. Control and tension is everything when it comes to casting.

I fought this for way too many years. I had  many fierce if friendly spats with Steve.

I now exceed to his view.

I don’t need to lug around two spare spools any more. Just a couple of sinking poly leaders. Eureka. :howdy:
 

Mike

 

Edited by Mike Oliver

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Sorry Mike "Bass are going to see a fly a lot easier in the water column than one ploughing the bottom attached to a fast sinking line." I've done much better and consistant in the heavy conditions I mentioned prior.I fish a floater 90% of the time otherwise.It just works well for me.

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