FisherPan

Northeasters | How many different fly lines do you REGULARLY use?

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I find that from a boat I'm using a 350grain sink tip on my TFA TiCR 10 wt most of the time. I know a lot of people like throwing a heavier sink tip on a 10 wt, but in my experience the 350 is able to do pretty much anything I need it to and is very easy to cast. Anything from 7' to 25' deep I can keep it in the zone.

I also have an outbound short int 10wt that I use on the beach, just much easier to load the rod with much less line out.

 

Now on the flats its a 8wt intermediate Airflo Cold Saltwater. That has been my favorite line to use in anything shallower than 7'. I prefer a long head ~40ft just cus thats my casting style when chasing these spooky fish.

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2 hours ago, FisherPan said:

You make a good point about mobility re two rods.    

 

Worth clarifying on this, at least in terms of what I do.  I carry a spare rod, broken down in a tube that I lash to my pack.  No impact on mobility, but admittedly one has to be ok with wearing a pack all day to do this.  Having 2 rods set up at once would kill mobility, although I have seen people jury rig a system where the spare rod is lashed to a pack.  But I think the risk here of hitting the spare rod with a clouser while casting in the wind is way too high to do this.

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8 mins ago, jalthoff said:

Worth clarifying on this, at least in terms of what I do.  I carry a spare rod, broken down in a tube that I lash to my pack.  No impact on mobility, but admittedly one has to be ok with wearing a pack all day to do this.  Having 2 rods set up at once would kill mobility, although I have seen people jury rig a system where the spare rod is lashed to a pack.  But I think the risk here of hitting the spare rod with a clouser while casting in the wind is way too high to do this.

Thank you @jalthoff.  Personally, I am pretty used to carrying two fully rigged rods (one for deep, one for dry dropper work mostly, streamers in a pinch), in all but the smallest streams (where I actually go full tenkara :)).  I use the wader belt loaded Vedavoo rod holder on my left side that I can quite easily lash a rod to with my left hand...which points the second rod backwards (slightly up) and outwards away from me and it took maybe two outings before I gained muscle memory and awareness of where the rod is to avoid tangles.  With the wind though....whole other ballgame.

 

I started with a one rod many leaders setup....but learned quickly that I ended up just fishing one level all day with one set up ...which wasn't really helping me create more opportunities to hook up when prospecting.

 

I am imagining some of this thinking about the water column tactics likely transfers to the salt even if fish SEEM much more mobile in this context...At this point I am trying to absorb the thought processes of the veterans/pioneers here to inform my approach to shore fishing in saltwater.....it feels like a whole other world...and I am wide eyed and deeply fascinated.

 

Fall will be my first real season where I will likely encounter conditions where mobility and big winds with two rods MIGHT be an issue...hoping to use warm weather now to get ready.  Am so looking forward to it.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Bait Tailer said:

I'd focus on your best local opportunities to get into fish, figure out what it requires, then branch out from there as you find other bites and patterns.

Thank you.  That's good advice.

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One line and one rod...likely an integrated shooting head intermediate....do your best not to overcomplicate fishing.  It takes away from the enjoyment.

 

If you can't fit it into your pockets, you probably don't need it.

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3 hours ago, FisherPan said:

 

 

  "I am starting to get the sense that this community here is ahead of the curve vs fly shops as it pertains to shore work (Surf, inlet, jetties) fishing on the fly." 

 BINGO!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Boat fishing:

9 wt CTS affinity x with a 350 grain rio striper sink tip

9wt CTS affinity w/ an intermediate quickshooter

Non- sight fishing wading:

Formerly 13' Burkie rio connectcore  and either 30' of t14 or 500 intermdiate skagit with 12.5 feet of t14

Sight fishing:

Rio Bad Ass Glass- 8' 8 wt, rio quickshooter or floater.

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River/estuary either an 8 wgt. with Cortland Big Game Intermediate (cream version) or a 9 wgt with Wulff BTT intermediate tip. Beach 10 wgt. with an Orvis intermediate I forgot the name of. Boat 10 wgt with that Orvis plus a spool of Orvis Depth Charge. I always intend to bring a spool of floating with my 9 for topwater but never seem to remember it. 2 small boxes of flies in pocket and a little spool of 20# tippet, good to go.

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6 hours ago, FisherPan said:

You make a good point about mobility re two rods.    

 

The big surprise for me in this thread is hearing the 10wt mentioned more than once, which is not a recommendation I have heard talking to the fly shops as the first set-up.  Yours and Redgreen's excellent posts on DIY TH Surf builds was what brought me to this forum months back.  This thread definitely has me thinking about taking on a build again, which sounds like a fun project.  

 

I have a 9wt T&T Exocett (scored a used one for a good price) with an SA Titan Full intermediate on the way on the back of fly shop recommendations which is much shorter than I am used to vs my 5wt with a 49' head.  I've been looking for a full intermediate line with a longer head but am worried about "overloading" the Exocett.  Will have to try casting the Titan on the rod with full head out to understand the loading characteristics of my rod.  I am also eyeing the SA Camo intermediate line after CaryGreen's excellent line manufacturer review but the total head weight of 395gr has me worried some but I do wonder if I am overthinking it (Beginner-itis).  Lines is the part of the gear list that I am most confused about.

 

I am starting to get the sense that this community here is ahead of the curve vs fly shops as it pertains to shore work (Surf, inlet, jetties) fishing on the fly. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The learning curve is steep. Ok the AAFTM rating for a 10 wt fly line is 280 grains plus or minus the tolerance for the first 30 feet of the head minus the short front taper. Every properly rated rod can comfortably handle another line size up. 
 

For me 395 grains on a 9 wt is more than pushing it. But rod ratings are all over the shop and so ate many modern fly lines which do not conform to the AAFTM standard.

 

I don’t understand why the full head length of that SA line would weigh 395 grains for a 9 wt.

 

 

If I take my Airflow Intermediate 10 wt the head is around 42 feet and at that length outside the rod tip its another half line size up. No problem for my rod.

 

A great many guys will suggest a  9 wt as a general purpose rod for the shore. A great many of them will also upline by one line size. I prefer not to do that. I make sure the rods I buy or build are true to rating.

Some modern 9 wt rods are really 10’s and I have handled some 10’s that were more like a 12 wt.

My preference is for a rod that will cast with ease a 280 grain line to AAFTM std  with a head length around 42 feet long. For some guys that could be a 9 wt rod for me it is a 10 wt.

 

Your 5 wt line with a 49 foot long head is really pretty poor design. In a fishing situation we are not looking for huge distances with 5 wt’s. Rio do this with their gold lines. Same length of head through the range. Why it does not make any sense.

 

Advice from fly shops varies greatly sadly. It varies on SOL too. No easy ride.

I guess as an old very opinionated git I now understand stuff and what works for me. I ran a different gauntlet. I could not take the fly shop one without losing my sanity. Lol

 

Dont forget the line tray and don’t be afraid of the wind.

 

It is  wonderful challenge.

 

mike

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As mentioned, ask 100 flyfishers, and you'll likely get 100 different answers, and only a few of them will be "wrong" :p .

 

I am shore based, I carry and fish one rod. I do have a backup in the car incase of a tragedy. I fish primarily a full intermediate line, probably 80% of the time. I carry an extra spool with a full, fast sink line which gets used 20% of the time. While I recognize the value of them, I don't like interchangeable tip systems. I'm a full line kinda guy. Even in the dark I can change out a spool and be back to fishing in under 5 minutes. I prefer to fish my 8WT, but agreed, if I could have only one rod it would be a 10. 

 

One thing I don't think I saw mentioned was the use of flies to target different portions of the water column. I can fish a popper on an intermediate. I can also fish deep with a heavy clouser on the same line, especially using a countdown method. 

 

Good luck!

Alan

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3 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Dont forget the line tray and don’t be afraid of the wind.

Thanks Mike.  Have the line tray ready for my first outing this weekend.  If you see a guy with an Exocett flailing away on the beach clumsily come say hi.  :)

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1 hour ago, Gilbey said:

I can fish a popper on an intermediate. I can also fish deep with a heavy clouser on the same line, especially using a countdown method. 

This will be the setup I try first this week...  Thanks Gilbey!!!

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2 hours ago, Gilbey said:

As mentioned, ask 100 flyfishers, and you'll likely get 100 different answers, and only a few of them will be "wrong" :p .

 

I am shore based, I carry and fish one rod. I do have a backup in the car incase of a tragedy. I fish primarily a full intermediate line, probably 80% of the time. I carry an extra spool with a full, fast sink line which gets used 20% of the time. While I recognize the value of them, I don't like interchangeable tip systems. I'm a full line kinda guy. Even in the dark I can change out a spool and be back to fishing in under 5 minutes. I prefer to fish my 8WT, but agreed, if I could have only one rod it would be a 10. 

 

One thing I don't think I saw mentioned was the use of flies to target different portions of the water column. I can fish a popper on an intermediate. I can also fish deep with a heavy clouser on the same line, especially using a countdown method. 

 

Good luck!

Alan

^^ yep, agree w/all and 8wt as well.

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I've a limited rod options, by choice.  I own 5, 6 and 8 wgt rods.  

Let's keep it at salt water.

The 6 wgt is the most versatile, in terms of line,  I usually fish a floating line with it in fresh water.  I'll fish the floating line in the salt depending on the wind.  I have two spare spools for the reel.  One with an intermediate line and the other with a sinking line.  Since wind is usually an issue in salt water, my first choice would be the intermediate line, since I can fish top waters with it.   The sinking line is for really windy days.  Both lines cut through the wind easier than the floating line.

The 8 wgt I have one spare spool for the reel.  Until recently I had a sinking line on the spare spool.  I just swapped it out for an intermediate line and put the sinking line on an older reel.  Same logic as for the 6 wgt, I can fish top waters with the intermediate.  I'll just have to carry the spare reel with me if I find myself in conditions where the sinking line is my best choice.

I know I'm probably undergunned for salt water, but the 6 and 8 wgts have worked for me so far.

I use the 5 and 6 wgts for cold water, trout.

All three for warm water.

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Fisherpan,

 

Just a word of warning casting clousers. A lot of ready mades have very heavy eyes and they are a real pig to cast. You are new and it is a bit different so if the wind is on your casting shoulder and you stay with it more than an even chance you will get a fly to rod collision. This can fracture your rod let alone what it might do to you. Hopefully you will know how to cast with your back to the water when the wind is like this.

If you tye your own flies so much the better. Spirit River do Clouser eyes called Real Eyes and their smallest size in a 5/32 casts pretty well. They are ok with hooks up to a size 1or 1/0.

Again transitioning from fresh to salt it will really help you cast, greatly if you cast from an open stance and watch your back cast all the way. It means your timing will be spot on and that you take all slack out of the system. This is massive. Few guys do this even in hard conditions. Never have figured out why.

Your first sortie will be amazing.

 

Mike

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